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North Carolina Writers' Network Fall Conference 2009

Friday November 20 through Sunday November 22

Holiday Inn SunSpree Resort at Wrightsville Beach, NC
877-330-5050
www.wrightsville.sunspreeresorts.com

(Use code W42 for special conference rates.)

Featuring Master Classes, more than thirty Classes and Workshops, Critique Service, Manuscript Mart, Faculty Readings, and Exhibits.

Register online here | Download a registration form

Advanced Registration is now closed. Walk in registrations will be available on site starting Friday, November 20th at 4 pm.

 

Fees & Important Dates | Complete Schedule-at-a-Glance
Faculty Biographies
Highlights | Class & Workshop Schedule and Descriptions
Session I | Session II | Session III | Session IV |Session V
Master Classes
Manuscript Mart
Critique Sessions

Conference Fees

Register online here | Download a registration form

Advanced Registration is now closed. Walk in registrations will be available on site starting Friday, November 20th at 4 pm.

Early registration: On-site registration as a walk-in:

Member Rates

  • $250 (includes meals)
  • $200 (without meals)
  • $200 (Saturday only, with meals)
  • $100 (Sunday only, without meals)

Nonmember Rates

  • $350 (includes meals)
  • $300 (without meals)
  • $300 (Saturday only, with meals)
  • $200 (Sunday only, without meals)

Other Fees

  • $30 for a Master Class
  • $150 for Manuscript Mart
  • $150 for Critique Service
  • $400 for members and non-members (does not include meals)

 

Scholarships
A limited number of scholarships will be available for Fall Conference. Please e-mail your scholarship request, along with a CV and statement of your writing goals, to Ed Southern at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Refunds and Cancellations

Cancellations must be made in writing and arrive at the Network by 5:00 pm on November 12, 2009, for you to receive a refund of the registration fee, less $150. No-shows or cancellations after November 12 are nonrefundable.

Manuscript Mart, Critique Service, and Master Class fees are not refundable if you cancel. However, if we are not able to find a place for you in the Manuscript Mart or Critique Service, we will return your check(s) for related extra charge(s). (Master Class application fees are nonrefundable, as they are administrative charges.)

Send all refund requests to NC Writers' Network Refund, PO Box 954, Carrboro, NC 27510.


Important Dates

November 1 Deadline to reserve hotel rooms at low conference rate
November 12 Deadline for Conference Registration (5:00 pm by phone or mail; midnight if registering online)
November 2 Received by Deadline for signing up for Master Class (See guidelines)
November 2 Received by Deadline for Manuscript Mart submissions (See guidelines)
November 2 Received by Deadline for Critique Service submissions (See guidelines)
November 20–22 Walk-in Registration available on site ($400, meals not included)
November 20–22 Conference in Session

Complete Schedule-at-a-Glance

Register online here | Download a registration form

Advanced Registration is now closed. Walk in registrations will be available on site starting Friday, November 20th at 4 pm.

Friday, November 20 though Sunday, November 22

Friday, November 20

5:00–9:00 pm Registration, Exhibitor Tables, Book Sales Tables open
7:30–8:30 pm Welcome Reception
8:30–9:30 pm Keynote Address by Cassandra King
9:30–10:30 pm Book signing and Reception

Saturday, November 21

7:30–9:00 am Continental breakfast available
8:00 am–7:30 pm Registration, Exhibitor Tables, and Book Sales Tables open
8:00–9:00 am Brilliant at Breakfast Panel Discussion: Where Can You Read About Writing?
9:00 am–5:00 pm Manuscript Mart* and Critique Service*
9:00–10:30 am Session I Workshop Classes
10:30–11:00 am Break
11:00 am–12:30 pm Session II Workshop Classes and Session I Master Classes*
12:30–1:30 pm Luncheon with readings from Long Story Short
1:30–2:30 pm Network Town Hall Meeting
2:30–3:00 pm Break
3:00–4:30 pm Session III Workshop Classes and Session II Master Classes*
4:30–5:00 pm Break
5:00–6:00 pm Faculty Readings
6:00–7:00 pm Happy Hour
7:00–9:00 pm Network Banquet with musical performance by Philip Gerard
9:00-10:00 pm Open Mike Readings

Sunday, November 22

7:30–9:00 am Continental breakfast available
8:00 am–1:00 pm Registration, Exhibitor Tables, and Book Sales Tables open
8:00–9:00 am Brilliant at Breakfast Panel Discussion: Editors and Agents
9:00 am–1:00 pm Manuscript Mart* and Critique Service*
9:00–10:30 am Session IV Workshop Classes
10:30–11:00 am Break
11:00 am–12:30 pm Session V Workshop Classes
12:30–1:00 pm Closing Remarks

*by prior appointment only


Faculty Biographies

Register online here | Download a registration form

Advanced Registration is now closed. Walk in registrations will be available on site starting Friday, November 20th at 4 pm.

Anthony Abbott

Anthony S. Abbott has taught English at Davidson College since 1964. He is the author of four collections of poetry and two novels. His latest poetry collection, The Man Who, won the 2005 Oscar Arnold Young Award from the North Carolina Poetry Council as that year’s best book of poetry by a North Carolinian. He is past president of the Charlotte Writers Club and the North Carolina Writers’ Network and also past chairman of the North Carolina Writers Conference. He is a three-time recipient of the Thomas H. McDill Award of the North Carolina Poetry Society. In 1996, St. Andrews College presented him with the Sam Ragan Award for his writing and service to the literary community of North Carolina, and in 2008 he was honored by Central Piedmont Community College with the Irene Blair Honeycutt Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Literary Arts.

Lavonne Adams

Lavonne J. Adams is the author of Through the Glorieta Pass (2007 Pearl Poetry Prize), and two chapbooks, In the Shadow of the Mountain and Everyday Still Life. She has published in more than fifty additional venues, including the Missouri Review, the Southern Humanities Review, and Poet Lore, and been awarded residencies at the Harwood Museum of Art (UNM Taos), The Helene Wurlitzer Foundation in Taos, and the Vermont Studio Center. She teaches at UNC Wilmington.

Ellyn Bache

Ellyn Bache is the author of nine novels, including Safe Passage, which was made into a film starring Susan Sarandon; Holiday Miracles, a novella that was named to the Publishers Weekly “Recommended Holiday Reading List”; and The Value of Kindness, a short story collection that won the Willa Cather Fiction Prize. After twenty years in Wilmington, NC, she now lives near Greenville, SC.

Danny Bernstein

Danny Bernstein is a hiker, hike leader, and outdoor writer. Her two guidebooks Hiking the Carolina Mountains (2007) and Hiking North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Heritage (2009) were published by Milestone Press. She writes for regional magazines including Mountain Xpress and Smoky Mountain Living and blogs about the outdoors at www.hikertohiker.com. Danny has learned that writing a book is only half the job; the other half is marketing.

Liz Biro

Freelance writer Liz Biro and her family came to North Carolina for the expansive beaches, friendly atmosphere, and fresh seafood. Since arriving as a child, she’s never looked back at her native New Jersey. A journalist for twenty-five years, she’s covered everything from local fisheries to politics. Liz left it all behind for a while to become a chef, and today writes about food and dining for various publications including the Star-News in Wilmington, NC.

Wendy Brenner

Wendy Brenner is the author of two books, Phone Calls from the Dead and Large Animals in Everyday Life, and the recipient of a National Endowment of the Arts Fellowship as well as the Flannery O'Connor Award for Short Fiction. Her essays and stories have appeared in Seventeen, Allure, Travel & Leisure, Esquire.com, and other magazines and have been anthologized in The Best American Magazine Writing and New Stories from the South. She is a contributing writer for the Oxford American magazine and has taught creative writing at UNC Wilmington since 1997.

Malcolm Campbell

Malcolm Campbell is the author of two adventure travel guidebooks, editor of professional golf instructor Dana Rader’s “how-to” book, Rock Solid Golf, and founder of the independent publishing house, Walkabout Press, Inc. In Malcolm’s twenty years as a commercial writer, he’s written everything from power-tool-accessory catalogues to television commercials to cover/feature stories for national magazines. Malcolm is the 2008 recipient of the Doris Betts Fiction Prize, and he teaches in UNC Charlotte’s freshman writing program.

Shea Carver

Shea Carver graduated from UNC Wilmington in 1999 with a double major in English (focus on creative writing) and communication studies (focus on advertising). She has worked for Wilmington's alternative weekly, encore, since she graduated, moving up the ladder from intern to editor in chief in only seven years. Shea currently oversees the staff of encore, including all freelance writers, as well as works in design, layout, and advertising. Yet, she enjoys writing most, whether she's covering the latest concert at Soapbox or dishing her opinions on politics, reveling in her latest dining experience or interviewing a local yokel for a human-interest story. In 2005 she started KIDZink magazine—a magazine by kids, about kids, and for kids and their families. The monthly publication focuses on education and organizations that better local youth. It also focuses on their achievements and accomplishments, including a showcase of their artwork, writings, photography, and the like. The magazine hopes to inspire and encourage youth to always reach for their dreams, and enjoy the rewards of self-fulfillment and expression through art.

Nancy Collins

Nancy A. Collins has had more than twelve novels and fifty short stories published over the past twenty years. The recipient of the Horror Writers Association’s Stoker Award and the British Fantasy Society Award, she has made numerous sales to the fantasy, horror, suspense, science fiction, western, and young adult markets.

Ben George

Ben George is editor of Ecotone and a former editor at Tin House. Previously, while earning his MFA from the University of Idaho, he edited the magazine Fugue. He has worked for Random House and Harcourt as well, and stories and essays he has edited have won the Pushcart Prize and the O. Henry Prize, and have been reprinted in Best American Short Stories, Best American Mystery Stories, Best American Essays, Best American Nonrequired Reading, and New Stories from the South. His published interviews with writers such as Anita Desai, W. S. Merwin, Andrea Barrett, Margot Livesey, Peter Ho Davies, and Rick Bass appear or are forthcoming in Tin House, Fugue, and the Believer. He is also the editor of the anthology The Book of Dads: Essays on the Joys, Perils, and Humiliations of Fatherhood (Ecco/HarperCollins, 2009). He lives with his wife and daughter in North Carolina and teaches at UNC Wilmington.

Phillip Gerard

Philip Gerard has published fiction and nonfiction in numerous magazines, including New England Review/Bread Loaf Quarterly, Creative Nonfiction, Hawai'i Review, Hayden's Ferry Review, and The World & I. His novels include Hatteras Light, nominated for the Ernest Hemingway Prize; Cape Fear Rising; and Desert Kill. His nonfiction books include Brilliant Passage, Writing a Book That Makes a Difference, and Creative Nonfiction: Researching and Crafting Stories of Real Life, which was a selection of the Book-of-the-Month and Quality Paperback book clubs. Maryanne Culpepper, director of story development for National Geographic Television, writes, “It is the manual for nonfiction storytellers … Creative Nonfiction is on every bookcase at National Geographic Television.” His most recent book of nonfiction, Secret Soldiers, tells the story of a group of artists who fought the Nazis by creating elaborate scenarios of deception, conjuring phantom armored divisions out of sound effects, radio scripts, pyrotechnics, and inflatable tanks. Gerard has also written television programs, documentaries, and radio essays. He teaches in the BFA and MFA programs of the Department of Creative Writing at UNC Wilmington, which he chairs. He is coeditor with his wife, Jill Gerard, of Chautauqua, the literary journal of the Chautauqua (NY) Writers' Center.

Marianne Gingher

Marianne Gingher is the author of seven books, including Bobby Rex’s Greatest Hit, which was named a National Library Association “Best Book of the Year” and won North Carolina’s Sir Walter Raleigh Award for Fiction in 1987. That novel was followed by Teen Angel and Other Stories of Wayward Love, How to Have a Happy Childhood, A Girl’s Life: Horses, Boys, Weddings, and Luck, and Adventures in Pen Land: One Writer’s Journey from Inklings to Ink. Her fiction and essays have appeared in numerous periodicals, including the Southern Review, the Oxford American, North American Review, the Washington Post Magazine, the Los Angeles Times, Ladies’ Home Journal, Redbook, McCall’s, Seventeen, O, the Oprah Magazine, and the New York Times Book Review. Her most recent book is Long Story Short: Flash Fiction by Sixty-five of North Carolina’s Finest Writers (UNC Press, 2009). She is professor of English and comparative literature in the Creative Writing Program at UNC Chapel Hill where she has taught for twenty-five years and served as director of the Creative Writing Program, 1997–2002.

Charles Heatherly

Charles Heatherly is a former newspaper reporter who has served the state of North Carolina as director of the Division of Travel and Tourism and as deputy state treasurer, among other positions. He is the author of The Courthouses of North Carolina, coauthor (with former state treasurer Harlan Boyles) of Keeper of the Public Purse: Public Finance in North Carolina, and he assisted former North Carolina commissioner of agriculture Jim Graham in writing Graham’s book The Sodfather. Now retired, he serves on the Board of Trustees of the North Carolina Writers’ Network and is an avid beekeeper.

Ginger Hendricks

Ginger Hendricks received her MFA in writing from Vermont College in 2003. She worked in special events planning at Elon University for two and a half years, and worked for four years at Salem College. There, she served as the director of the Center for Women Writers and coordinator of cultural events and taught in the English and creative writing department. Her fiction and nonfiction have appeared in the Paterson Literary Review, Big Muddy: A Journal of the Mississippi River Valley, Skirt!, Birmingham Arts Journal, the Winston-Salem Journal, and others. She serves as the treasurer of the North Carolina Writers’ Network Board.

Suzanne Havala Hobbs

Suzanne Havala Hobbs, DrPH, MS, RD, holds a doctorate in health policy and administration from UNC Chapel Hill where she is a clinical associate professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management, Gillings School of Global Public Health, and director of the Executive Doctoral Program in Health Leadership (www.sph.unc.edu/hpaa/executive_drph). A licensed, registered dietitian, her professional interests include food and nutrition policy (domestic and international), dietary guidance policy, cultural proficiency in health services delivery, and health journalism and communication. A professional health writer, she is the author of eleven consumer books, including Living Vegetarian for Dummies (Wiley, 2009) and Get the Trans Fat Out (Random House, 2006). Her diet and health column, “On the Table,” appears weekly in the News & Observer (Raleigh, NC) and the Charlotte Observer. She is a member of several professional associations and served on the board of directors of the Association of Health Care Journalists and the Center for Excellence in Health Care Journalism. She is currently a member of the Board of Trustees of the North Carolina Writers’ Network.

Henry Hutton

Henry Hutton is an experienced professional in the field of online collaboration and publishing, and possesses first-hand knowledge in exploring, developing, and optimizing new market strategies and technologies in the increasingly competitive online space. As founder of nowRECORDING.com in 2001, Mr. Hutton created on online environment for musicians all over the world to create and record music together. After nowRECORDING was acquired by Lulu.com in 2003, Mr. Hutton served Lulu in several capacities including online community director, director of operations, and director of business intelligence. He also served as product manager for Lulu Studio™—Lulu's latest interactive publishing technology. Mr. Hutton has recently started a new venture, Publish and Sell Enterprises, which provides a low-cost, full-service solution for authors to successfully publish, market, and sell their books. You can find out more by visiting his Web site at http://publishandsell.com.

Cassandra King

Cassandra King’s novels have won the hearts of readers everywhere, especially in the American South. A native of LA (Lower Alabama), she now lives in South Carolina with her husband, novelist Pat Conroy. She is the author of four best-selling novels, Making Waves, The Sunday Wife, The Same Sweet Girls, and Queen of Broken Hearts, as well as numerous short stories and articles. The Sunday Wife was a Book Sense Pick and a People magazine Page Turner of the Week; The Same Sweet Girls a number one Book Sense selection, and Queen of Broken Hearts, a Literary Guild and Book-of-the-Month Club pick. Bridal Falls, a fifth novel, will be released in 2010.

Stephen Kirk

Stephen Kirk has edited approximately 140 books since starting with John F. Blair, Publisher, in 1988. He is the author of Scribblers: Stalking the Authors of Appalachia and First in Flight: The Wright Brothers in North Carolina. His writing has also appeared in The Best American Short Stories series, Sports in the Carolinas, and other volumes. He is especially interested in literary fiction and mysteries set in the Southeast, folklore, travel, cookbooks, biographies, and regional history.

Lisa Williams Kline

Lisa Williams Kline is the author of three middle-grade novels: Eleanor Hill, which won the North Carolina Juvenile Literature Award, The Princesses of Atlantis, and Write Before Your Eyes from Delacorte Press. She has also published a nonfiction book entitled Floods. Her stories for children have appeared in Cricket, Cicada, Spider, and Odyssey. Her stories for adults have appeared in about a dozen literary journals and anthologies. She earned her MFA from Queens University.

Nicki Leone

Nicki Leone showed her proclivities early when as a young child she asked her parents if she could exchange the jewelry a well-meaning relative had given her for Christmas for a dictionary instead. She supported her college career with a part-time job in a bookstore, or perhaps it would be more accurate to say that her college career and attending financial aid loans supported her predilection for working as a bookseller. She has been in the book business for more than twenty years. Currently she works for the Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance, developing marketing and outreach programs for independent bookstores. Nicki has been a book reviewer for several magazines, her local public radio station, and local television stations. She currently serves as president of the Board of Trustees of the North Carolina Writers' Network, and as managing editor of BiblioBuffet.

 

Peter Makuck

Peter Makuck grew up in New London, CT, and graduated from St. Francis College in Maine where he studied French and English. After teaching French for several years, he returned to graduate school for a doctorate in American literature and was later a Fulbright lecturer in France. His Long Lens: New and Selected Poems will be released by BOA Editions, Ltd., in April 2010. He has also published two collections of short stories, Breaking and Entering and Costly Habits. Founder and editor of Tar River Poetry from 1978 to 2006, he is distinguished professor emeritus at East Carolina University. His poems and stories, essays, and reviews have appeared in the Georgia Review, the Hudson Review, Poetry, the Sewanee Review, the Nation, and so on.

Priscilla Melchior

Priscilla Melchior is an award-winning journalist who has spent more than thirty years working in community newspapers as a reporter, photographer, senior editor, and online producer. She has also worked as a freelance editor and writing coach, and served as an adjunct journalism instructor at East Carolina University. She has been recognized for her writing, layout, and design, her teaching, and her online leadership, winning awards on both the state and national levels. In January of 2009, she retired from the newsroom to work on personal writing projects and to return to school in hopes of developing technical engineering expertise in the online world.

David Monahan

Dave Monahan is an associate professor of film studies at UNC Wilmington. He is the coauthor of Looking At Movies, an introduction to film studies published by W. W. Norton and Company. His work as a writer/director/editor includes Ringo (2005); Monkey Junction (2004); Prime Time (1996); and Angels Watching Over Me (1993). His work has screened internationally in more than fifty film festivals and has earned numerous awards, including the New Line Cinema Award for Most Original Film (Prime Time); and the Seattle International Film Festival Grand Jury Prize for Best Animated Short Film (Ringo).

Alice Osborn

Alice Osborn is the author of Right Lane Ends (Catawba, 2006), a former English teacher at Raleigh Charter High School, and she works with the United Arts Council to bring writing and creativity to grades four–twelve in area schools. Alice offers creative writing and business seminars throughout the Triangle and teaches at NC State’s Young Writers’ Workshop, Meredith College, UNC Friday Center, Duke Continuing Studies, and other learning centers. She also offers editing and writing services to small businesses and creatives through her business, Write from the Inside Out. She is a regular contributor to the Pedestal Magazine and Wake Living and blogs weekly about networking and writing. In addition, her poetry has appeared in Soundings Review, Main Street Rag, the 2008 and 2009 Kakalak poetry anthologies, the Raleigh Quarterly, and more. She serves as the Raleigh regional representative for the North Carolina Writers' Network and is the organizer of the north Raleigh Coffee and Contacts: Power Networking for Women chapter. Alice grew up in the Washington, DC, area and earned a BS in finance from Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, VA. She now lives in Raleigh, NC, with her husband, son, and daughter. Visit her Web site at www.aliceosborn.com.

Ellen Pepus

Ellen Pepus has a BA in English literature from Indiana University and a JD from the George Washington University National Law Center. Prior to becoming an agent she worked at various times as a lawyer, investigator, marketer, writer, and editor. She was assistant to agent Jeff Kleinman at the Graybill and English Literary Agency before opening her own solo agency, which in 2009 became Signature Literary Agency when she teamed up with New York agent Gary Heidt. Her clients include mystery author Elizabeth Craig (Pretty Is as Pretty Dies, Midnight Ink, 2009, and an upcoming three-book series from Berkley), DeAnna Cameron (The Belly Dancer, Berkley, 2009), memoirist Dawn Goodwin, Novello Literary Award finalists Marann Mincey and Rachel Mork, blogger and humorist Emma Kaufmann, erotic novelists Kate Rothwell and Bonnie Dee, investigative journalist Nate Ferguson, physician and stand-up comic Dr. Melanie Rotenberg, and many other talented novelists and nonfiction authors. Recent agency sales include Jason Henderson’s young adult fantasy series Alex Van Helsing to Harper Collins, A. S. King’s Ignore Vera Dietz to Knopf, Dr Melanie Rotenberg’s Laugh Yourself Thin to Praeger, Marley Majcher’s … But Are You Making Any Money? to Morgan James, and Jess Haines’s three-book urban fantasy series Dealing With the Others to Kensington Books.

Ellen Pepus

David Perry

David Perry is the editor in chief of UNC Press. He serves on the boards of the Village Band of Chapel Hill and Carrboro, NC, Southern Cultures, and the North Carolina Writers’ Network.

Brooks Preik

Brooks Preik began her writing career in 1993 when she coauthored a guidebook to the Wilmington, NC, area entitled What Locals Know About Wilmington and Its Beaches. Her collection of “true” ghost stories, Haunted Wilmington and the Cape Fear Coast, published in 1995 by Banks Channel Books, is now in its sixth printing. She has published more than seventy-five articles in regional magazines and is former editor in chief and feature writer for Capturing the Spirit of the Carolinas magazine. In June 2008 she launched a new career when she and her daughter, Angela Carr, bought Two Sisters Bookery, an independent bookstore in The Cotton Exchange in Wilmington. She is now a full-time “indie” bookseller.

Linda Rohrbough

Linda Rohrbough has been writing since 1989, and has more than five thousand articles and seven books to her credit along with awards for fiction and nonfiction. New York Times best-selling authors are calling Linda a nationally recognized consultant on marketing a manuscript. Her latest book, coauthored with her surgeon, is Weight Loss Surgery with the Adjustable Gastric Band from Da Capo Press. Visit her Web site: www.LindaRohrbough.com.

Robert Anthony Siegel

Robert Anthony Siegel is the author of two novels, All Will Be Revealed and All The Money in the World. He was born in New York City and educated at Harvard, the University of Tokyo, and the Iowa Writers' Workshop. He teaches creative writing at UNC Wilmington, where he lives in a yellow house with his wife, the writer Karen E. Bender, and their two children, Jonah and Maia. His Web site is www.robertanthonysiegel.com.

Emily Smith

Emily Smith is the director of The Publishing Laboratory at UNC Wilmington, a book imprint housed in the Department of Creative Writing, where she teaches courses in book design and publishing arts. She has done freelance editing and book design for several publishing houses and currently serves as art director for Ecotone, the award-winning literary journal of place. With Ben George, she recently founded the literary imprint Lookout Books. Her poetry has appeared in Columbia Poetry Review, Smartish Pace, Tar River Poetry, and other publications. She holds a BA in English from Davidson College and an MFA in poetry from UNC Wilmington.

Mark Smith-Soto

Costa Rican American poet Mark Smith-Soto is professor of romance languages, editor of International Poetry Review, and director of the Center for Creative Writing in the Arts at UNC Greensboro. Winner of a 2005 National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in creative writing, he has published three chapbooks and two full-length poetry collections to date, Our Lives Are Rivers (University Press of Florida, 2003) and Any Second Now (Main Street Rag Publishing Co., 2006). His poetry has appeared in Antioch Review, Kenyon Review, Literary Review, Nimrod, Poetry East, Quarterly West, Rosebud Magazine, the Sun, and numerous other publications. His manuscript Waiting Room was published in December 2008 as the winner of Red Mountain Review’s annual chapbook competition. Fourteen of his ten-minute and one-act plays have been produced. Trio, a play in verse (inspired by a visit to the Holocaust museum in Washington, DC) was produced by Theatre Orange of the Arts Center of Carrboro and Chapel Hill, NC, as a winner of their 2003 “Ten by Ten in the Triangle” competition and was published by Dramatic Publishing of Chicago in 2005.

 

Ben Steelman has been with the Star-News of Wilmington, NC, since 1977, in such roles as feature writer, copy editor, film critic, and assistant editorial page editor. He is currently book columnist for the newspaper and writes its literary blog, Bookmarks. A North Carolina native, Steelman graduated from UNC Chapel Hill. His first book, Wilm on Film (coauthored with Amy Hotz), is scheduled for release this Christmas.

Peter Steinberg

Peter Steinberg worked for eleven years as a literary agent at a number of high-profile boutique literary agencies, including Donadio and Olson and Regal Literary before forming his own company, The Steinberg Agency, in 2007. Peter’s clients have been nominated for or awarded Edgars, Quills, the Pulitzer Prize, the Story Prize, the Paris Review Discovery Prize, Borders Original Voices, and National Book Awards. Peter represents a broad range of novels and short story collections and the occasional young adult title. His nonfiction interests include memoir, humor, biography, history, pop culture, fitness, and narrative nonfiction. Peter began his career as a filmmaker and screenwriter with a BA from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts’ film school. He is a member of the Association of Authors’ Representatives.

Peter Steinberg

Betsy Thorpe

Betsy Thorpe has worked in the book publishing business for seventeen years. In New York, she was an acquiring and developmental editor in the adult trade departments of John Wiley and Sons, Macmillan Books, Broadway/Doubleday, and HarperCollins. For the last eight years, Betsy has operated a freelance editorial business, and co-written three published books. One of her freelance clients is Novello Festival Press, where she serves as marketing director. Betsy's latest book, 365 Nights: A Memoir of Intimacy, was featured in the New York Times and on The Today Show.

Betsy Thorpe

Kevin Watson

Kevin Morgan Watson is the founding editor of Press 53, a small, independent literary publishing company in Winston-Salem, NC. As a publisher, he has worked with writers ranging from first-time published authors to winners of the National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize. As a writer, his short stories, poetry, and essays have appeared in numerous publications, including the 2002 TallGrass Writers Guild/Outrider Press anthology Take Two—They’re Small, where his short story “Sunny Side Up” won first prize. Kevin also serves as an advisor for student adaptation of short stories to screenplays with the screenwriting faculty at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts, School of Filmmaking.

Samm-Art Williams

Samm-Art Williams was born in Philadelphia and grew up in Burgaw, NC. After graduating from Morgan State College in Baltimore, he studied with the Freedom Theater's Acting workshop in Philadelphia, under the direction of John Allen and Bob Leslie. As a member of the Negro Ensemble Company, he performed in such plays as The First Breeze of Summer, Eden, and Nevis Mountain Dew. He also wrote many plays, including Home, which received a Tony nomination in the category of Best Broadway Play and toured internationally. He had a lucrative career in television, where he took on roles as an actor, writer, and executive producer for popular shows such as Fresh Prince of Bel-Air and Martin. He has been nominated for two Emmy Awards.

 

Fall Conference 2009: Highlights

Register online here | Download a registration form

Advanced Registration is now closed. Walk in registrations will be available on site starting Friday, November 20th at 4 pm.

Friday, November 20

5:00 pm through Sunday—Exhibitor Tables open

Find out what’s going on in the literary world by visiting our exhibitors: magazines, publishers, literary and arts organizations, and other friends of writers.

7:30 pm—Welcome Reception

Yes, an evening stroll on the beach sounds tempting, but wouldn’t you rather start getting to know the writers, agents, editors, and other literary types attending the conference with you?

8:30 pm—Keynote Address by Cassandra King

Cassandra King—the best-selling and award-winning author of such novels as Queen of Broken Hearts, The Same Sweet Girls, and the forthcoming Bridal Falls—will deliver this year’s keynote address. A book signing and reception will follow.

Saturday, November 21

8:00 am—Brilliant at Breakfast Panel Discussion

Yes, a sunrise jog on the beach is very healthy for you, but run fast so you can exercise your mind, too. Join us in the Lumina Ballroom for a discussion on the present and future of book reviews, and of print media in general. Moderated by columnist and NCWN board member Suzanne Havala Hobbs, this panel will include Wilmington Star-News book editor Ben Steelman, award-winning journalist and NCWN member Priscilla Melchior, and NCWN board president Nicki Leone, bookseller/book reviewer/book commentator extraordinaire. This discussion is open to all conference attendees (except those registered for Sunday only).

9:00 am through Sunday—Publishing Track Workshops

Nothing’s wrong with following the Emily Dickinson career track (leaving some of the most brilliant work in the English language in a trunk to be discovered after your death), but most writers prefer to have their work published while they’re still around to read it. Sign up for one or more of our Publishing Track Workshops this weekend: “Learn How to Talk About Your Book to an Editor or Agent” with veteran writer and publicist Linda Rohrbough; “Preparing and Marketing for a Book Event” with NCWN board member Ginger Hendricks, the former director of Salem College’s Center for Women Writers; “An Editor's Perspective on Proposals for Nonfiction Books” with UNC Press editor in chief David Perry; a panel discussion on “The Ins, Outs, Pros, and Cons of Self-Publishing”; and plenty more.

12:30 pm—Luncheon with readings from Long Story Short

Join Marianne Gingher, editor of the new collection Long Story Short: Flash Fiction by Sixty-five of North Carolina’s Finest Writers, and contributors (and Fall Conference instructors) Anthony Abbott, Wendy Brenner, Philip Gerard, and Peter Makuck, as they read their short-short stories.

1:30 pm—Second Annual Network Town Hall Meeting

If you’ve got questions about the Network, executive director Ed Southern has the answers. Or he’ll make up something that sounds good.

5:00 pm—Faculty Readings

You’ve spent the day listening to their instructions; here’s your chance to see if they really know what they’re talking about.

7:00 pm—Network Banquet with musical performance by Philip Gerard

After a full day of workshops, discussions, and readings, come join us for our annual banquet and the musical stylings of writer Philip Gerard.

Sunday, November 22

8:00 am—Brilliant at Breakfast Panel Discussion: Editors and Agents

They are editors and agents who’ve seen many manuscripts through to publication. You are writers with plans, hopes, or dreams of publication. Discuss.

12:30 pm—Closing Remarks
You don’t have to go home, but you can’t stay here.


Fall Conference 2009: Class & Workshop Schedule and Descriptions

Register online here | Download a registration form

Advanced Registration is now closed. Walk in registrations will be available on site starting Friday, November 20th at 4 pm.

Saturday

Brilliant at Breakfast Panel Discussion
Saturday, November 21
8:00–9:00 am

Where Can You Read About Writing?

Suzanne Havala Hobbs, moderator
Ben Steelman
Priscilla Melchior
Nicki Leone
Many newspapers’ book sections—often the best (and sometimes the only) places to find out about writers and their latest work—were early casualties in the decline of print media. What is the current state of book pages and book reviews? What does the future hold for news coverage of the literary world? Where can you go to read about writing? This panel will discuss these topics and more.

Session I Workshop Classes
Saturday, November 21
9:00–10:30 am

Finding the Form in Free Verse with Anthony Abbott

In this workshop, we will look at some of the different ways free verse poets have organized their poems. We will look at how they design lines and stanzas within a format that is not measured by meter and rhyme but is clearly measured in other ways. We will look particularly at the work of William Carlos Williams and its striking influence on more contemporary poetry. Bring poems of your own to work on, because we will do exercises involving the restructuring of our own poems.

Panel Discussion
Writing Flash Fiction

Marianne Gingher, moderator
Wendy Brenner
Peter Makuck
What is a short-short story? How do you write one? Join Marianne Gingher, editor of Long Story Short: Flash Fiction by Sixty-five of North Carolina's Finest Writers (UNC Press, fall 2009) and two of the authors who contributed work to this collection for a lively discussion of the unique challenges and rewards flash fiction practitioners encounter and enjoy.

Learn How to Talk About Your Book to an Editor or Agent with Linda Rohrbough

The most important thing prepublished authors learn is how to talk about their work in a way that attracts interest from an editor or agent. That's how they become published authors. But most authors will tell you this is a very different skill set than actually writing the book. This interactive workshop presents a simple, three-step formula for an effective, attention-getting pitch that works for any book, fiction or nonfiction. With compelling examples, award-winning author Linda Rohrbough provides principles for success (including how to manage fear) along with the four things all authors must know about their manuscript. Attendees get all the tools they need to effectively talk about their work to other publishing professionals, as well as to readers and bookstore owners after they’re published.

Writing a Novel for Young People: Five Things I Wish I'd Known with Lisa Williams Kline

After I'd already published two novels, I hit a dry spell where I couldn't seem to publish anything I wrote. I had to go back to the beginning and figure out what I had done right with those first two books and what I was doing wrong with the next ones. In this workshop, I'll try to share the five most important things I learned during this painful period of belated growth.

Session II Workshop Classes and Session I Master Classes*
Saturday, November 21
11:00 am–12:30 pm

Master Class in Fiction*
with Robert Anthony Siegel

All too often, when we sit down to write, we tend to think of characters in isolation, even though people in real life usually define themselves in relation to others. In this Master Class in fiction, we will learn how to build vivid, three-dimensional, flesh-and-blood characters by pairing them up with other characters and getting them to interact. In a series of creative in-class exercises, characters will meet, fight, fall in and out of love, get married and divorced—and in the process become compelling, fully formed beings rich enough to people a world of stories and novels.

*by prior appointment only. See Master Class Guidelines

Master Class in Nonfiction*
with Philip Gerard

The successful writer of creative nonfiction must accomplish two things at once: 1) present an accurate, factual view of the world that is informed by diligent, resourceful research and careful reporting; and 2) deliver a larger meaning through personal engagement with the facts. Neither alone can result in a compelling literary work. Through the use of examples culled from participant work and published writing, we’ll explore how to meet both these creative demands in the various subgenres of nonfiction—personal narrative and memoir, public history, social commentary, radio essays, etc. We’ll look at research as a creative act and discuss ways to integrate research into a riveting narrative through craft: tone, diction, syntax, narrative arc, plot, and texture. Integral to our discussion will be dramatic structure and narrative intelligence, the personality that lives in the lines on the page.

*by prior appointment only. See Master Class Guidelines

Master Class in Poetry*
with Peter Makuck

This class will concern itself with the process of revision and the range of questions that writers of open-form poems must consider. We will read several poems by established authors and critique poems submitted to the workshop. Please submit three poems for discussion. At least one will be talked about in class, and, if time permits, more. The workshop will be critically honest and frank, but supportive and encouraging as well.

*by prior appointment only. See Master Class Guidelines

How to Write How-To with Danny Bernstein and Malcolm Campbell

Good “how-to” books—whether travel guides, cookbooks, or instructional books—should be very straightforward and easy to read. Easy reading, though, is the result of hard writing, and writing a good guidebook is one of the toughest challenges a writer can face. But the challenges are worth it, when you consider that these nonfiction books make up the bulk of total book sales in the United States. Join two experienced guidebook writers as they discuss how to write and market “how-to” books.

Panel Discussion
Cooking Up the Words: Writers on Food and Culture in the American South

Suzanne Havala Hobbs, moderator
Liz Biro
Shea Carver
Pull up a chair and channel a bowl of cheese grits and a slice of pecan pie. Meet leading Southern food writers Liz Biro and Shea Carver, hear their stories, and learn from their experiences. Participants will discuss how they got started, how they're inspired, challenges and opportunities for publishing in magazines, books, and electronic media, and how the environment for their work has changed in the past year.

Preparing and Marketing for a Book Event with Ginger Hendricks

This workshop is now closed

Your book has been published! Now, comes the hard part—planning and preparing for book events where people will (hopefully) attend and buy your book. From the experience of an event planner, suggestions will be shared about how to make each book event a success. Topics will include whom (and how) to contact (bookstores, universities, etc.), promotion for events, payment questions, preparation (including a book event packing list), how to dress, and follow-up after the event.

Session III Workshop Classes and Session II Master Classes*
Saturday, November 21
3:00–4:30 pm

Continued: Master Class in Fiction* with Robert Anthony Siegel
Continued: Master Class in Nonfiction* with Philip Gerard
Continued: Master Class in Poetry* with Peter Makuck

*by prior appointment only. See Master Class Guidelines

Where We’re Comin’ From: Using Dialect in Writing with Ginger Hendricks

This workshop will explore the use of dialect in both dialogue and exposition and how it reveals regional qualities, class, age, gender, and other aspects of a character. By portraying an accent, using slang, jargon, correct or incorrect grammar, foreign terms, etc., an author gives characters personality and a distinct place in this world, thus they come alive. This lecture will look at how such authors as Doris Betts, Robert Olen Butler, Junot Diaz, Ernest Gaines, Kazuo Ishiguro, Flannery O’Connor, Mark Twain, and Tom Wolfe approach dialect. Also addressed will be how writers can keep from stereotyping characters through dialect. Writing exercises will conclude the workshop.

No Ideas but in Things: Making Poetry Matter with Mark Smith-Soto

Nothing diminishes the impact of our words more than the presentation of ideas, attitudes, and expressions of emotion that are not rooted in the immediacy of sensory impressions. In this workshop, we will explore ways to infuse the breath of life into the language of our poetry. I’ll hand out to the participants slips of paper on which I have written the name of some emotional state: mad, sad, glad, frustrated, worried, pitying, etc. Then I’ll ask them to close their eyes, relax, and see what images, associations, or sensory details come to mind … and then in no more than three or four lines, to write down in language as concrete and connected to the five senses as possible, one image/metaphor/object that they feel will communicate the emotion to everyone else in the group without it being mentioned specifically at all. Then we’ll share what we came up with and see if others can guess what the emotion was.

An Editor's Perspective on Proposals for Nonfiction Books with David Perry

In this workshop (inspired by Susan Rabiner’s book Thinking Like Your Editor), David Perry, the editor in chief of UNC Press, will review what an editor looks for in nonfiction book proposals and then will discuss what happens to a proposal inside the publishing house and the dynamics of in-house review and decision making.

Sunday

Brilliant at Breakfast Panel Discussion
Sunday, November 22
8:00–9:00 am

Brilliant at Breakfast Panel Discussion: Editors and Agents

Ed Southern, moderator
Stephen Kirk
Ellen Pepus
Peter Steinberg
Betsy Thorpe
Kevin Morgan Watson
They are editors and agents who’ve seen many manuscripts through to publication. You are writers with plans, hopes, or dreams of publication. Discuss.

Session IV Workshop Classes
Sunday, November 22
9:00–10:30 am

Ten Tips for Crafting Your Fiction with Ellyn Bache

This workshop is now closed

When is it safe to introduce background about a character without chasing away the reader? How do you rev up interest in secondary characters? What’s a sure way to ruin an action scene, and how do you avoid it? Whatever your level of experience, these fiction tips will help you sharpen and strengthen your work.

Turning Personal Artifact into Story with Wendy Brenner

Beyond the nuts and bolts of basic journalism, the creative writer’s relationship with research is intuitive and fluid and mysterious, even alchemical. Sometimes we conduct research, and sometimes the research conducts us. In this workshop we will explore how to develop and shape story out of “raw material” such as personal letters, e-mails, voicemails, tape and video recordings, transcriptions, and even the most incidental-seeming ephemera. Do you still have the note a stranger wrote you on a napkin thirty years ago? Then this is the workshop for you. We will look at an array of research methods—Studs Terkel’s cassette tape recorder, Errol Morris’s Interrotron, Susan Orlean’s short profiles—focusing closely on how writers can integrate and transform the ephemeral into literary art.

The Cover-Up: Book Design Basics for Writers with Emily Smith

What makes a book jacket compelling? Do publishers weigh aesthetics or marketing strategies more heavily? Designer and publisher Emily Smith reveals the essentials of a successful book cover and explains the author's role in the process. Case studies will help illustrate publishers' decisions—from best sellers to blunders. Journal editors and authors considering self-publication will learn how to stretch limited resources to create smart, striking covers.

How to Fit Social Media into Our Busy Writing Lives with Alice Osborn

Are you still trying to figure out what’s all the fuss about following, friending, and tweeting? We’re moving away from visiting Web sites to find out information; instead, users are more passive and are waiting for information to come to them via status updates, blog feeds, e-newsletters, and more. Social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and YouTube need to be part of your overall marketing plan. Let Alice Osborn, writer, entrepreneur, and editor, help you navigate the world of social media to build your audience, build your brand, and build your credibility. In this workshop you’ll learn how to create an effective online profile, manage your online time, learn the grammar/etiquette of social media, and take away valuable tips on e-newsletters and online video posting.

Session V Workshop Classes
Sunday, November 22
11:00 am–12:30 pm

Paperback Writer: Tips and Strategies for the Genre Market with Nancy A. Collins

This workshop will offer practical advice on writing for the genre market and getting your stories sold, including tips on preparing book proposals, finding an agent, locating a publisher, and catching an editor’s eye.

Writing for Literary Magazines with Ben George

Whether you write fiction, nonfiction, or poetry, literary magazines and journals are some of the best places to get your work noticed and to start building an audience. In this workshop, Ecotone and former Tin House editor Ben George will discuss tips and techniques for finding the right magazine for your work, and submitting your work the right way.

Screenwriting for Fiction Writers with Dave Monahan

This workshop will provide an introduction to screenwriting format, craft, and technique designed to help fiction writers adapt their storytelling and style to the particular demands of writing for the screen.

Panel Discussion:
The Ins, Outs, Pros, and Cons of Self-Publishing

Charles Heatherly, moderator
Brooks Preik
Henry Hutton
Self-publishing is an increasingly popular option for writers to see their work in print. But is it the best option for you? This panel will discuss everything writers need to know —the advantages and disadvantages, the opportunities and responsibilities—before deciding to publish their own work.

MANUSCRIPT MART
Stephen Kirk, John F. Blair, Publisher (regional nonfiction, fiction)
Ellen Pepus, Signature Literary Agency (fiction, creative nonfiction)
Peter Steinberg, The Steinberg Agency (fiction, creative nonfiction)
Betsy Thorpe, Novello Festival Press (regional nonfiction, fiction)
Kevin Morgan Watson, Press 53 (short fiction, poetry)

CRITIQUE SERVICE
Lavonne Adams (poetry)
Philip Gerard (fiction, nonfiction)
Lisa Williams Kline (children’s)
David Perry (nonfiction)
Samm-Art Williams (playwriting, screenwriting)


Master Classes

Register online here | Download a registration form

Advanced Registration is now closed. Walk in registrations will be available on site starting Friday, November 20th at 4 pm.

Master Classes offer intermediate and advanced writers a chance to delve more deeply into a particular genre. Master Class is an alternative for Session II and III classes and will be limited to fifteen registrants.

Saturday, November 21
11:00 am12:30 pm & 3:00 pm4:30 pm

Master Class in Fiction*
with Robert Anthony Siegel
All too often, when we sit down to write, we tend to think of characters in isolation, even though people in real life usually define themselves in relation to others. In this Master Class in fiction, we will learn how to build vivid, three-dimensional, flesh-and-blood characters by pairing them up with other characters and getting them to interact. In a series of creative in-class exercises, characters will meet, fight, fall in and out of love, get married and divorced—and in the process become compelling, fully formed beings rich enough to people a world of stories and novels.

Master Class in Nonfiction*
with Philip Gerard
The successful writer of creative nonfiction must accomplish two things at once: 1) present an accurate, factual view of the world that is informed by diligent, resourceful research and careful reporting; and 2) deliver a larger meaning through personal engagement with the facts. Neither alone can result in a compelling literary work. Through the use of examples culled from participant work and published writing, we’ll explore how to meet both these creative demands in the various subgenres of nonfiction—personal narrative and memoir, public history, social commentary, radio essays, etc. We’ll look at research as a creative act and discuss ways to integrate research into a riveting narrative through craft: tone, diction, syntax, narrative arc, plot, and texture. Integral to our discussion will be dramatic structure and narrative intelligence, the personality that lives in the lines on the page.

Master Class in Poetry*
with Peter Makuck
This class will concern itself with the process of revision and the range of questions that writers of open-form poems must consider. We will read several poems by established authors and critique poems submitted to the workshop. Please submit three poems for discussion. At least one will be talked about in class, and, if time permits, more. The workshop will be critically honest and frank, but supportive and encouraging as well.

Admissions

Participants are admitted on the strength of a writing sample submitted in advance of the conference. While publication credits are not required, you should submit a brief cover letter summarizing your writing background and highlighting publication credits if applicable.

Include a payment of $30 (nonrefundable processing fee).

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: November 2, 2009 (RECEIVED BY DATE).

When you register for Master Class, please choose another class as a backup in case you are not admitted to the Master Class.

Submission Guidelines for Each Genre

  • Fiction. Submit a cover letter and no more than ten double-spaced pages of fiction, 12-point type (short story or novel excerpt). Mail two hard copies to NCWN Fiction Master Class, PO Box 954, Carrboro, NC 27510.
  • Nonfiction. Submit a cover letter and no more than ten double-spaced pages of nonfiction, 12-point type (essay or excerpt). Mail two hard copies to NCWN Nonfiction Master Class, PO Box 954, Carrboro, NC 27510.
  • Poetry. Submit a cover letter and no more than five single-spaced pages of poetry, 12-point type. Mail two hard copies to NCWN Poetry Master Class, PO Box 954, Carrboro, NC 27510.

Two weeks before the conference, you will be notified about your enrollment status.


Manuscript Mart

Register online here | Download a registration form

Advanced Registration is now closed. Walk in registrations will be available on site starting Friday, November 20th at 4 pm.

Manuscript Mart provides writers with the opportunity to pitch their manuscripts and get feedback from an editor or agent with a leading publisher or literary agency. A one-on-one, twenty-five-minute pitch and Q&A session will be scheduled for you, to take place on Saturday, November 21, from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm or Sunday, November 22, between 9:00 am and 1:00 pm.

Note: Manuscript Mart sessions are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. You must register for Manuscript Mart by mail, with manuscript and payment enclosed, by November 2, 2009 (RECEIVED BY DATE).

Guidelines

  • Submit a one-page query letter and twenty double-spaced pages of your fiction or nonfiction manuscript (for book-length projects, you must include a one-page synopsis of the work as a whole). You may include a book proposal or query letter as part of your twenty pages. Make sure your name is on each page of your submission. NUMBER YOUR PAGES.
  • All submissions must be double-spaced with 12-point font, on 8 1/2 x 11 inch paper, 1 inch margins.
  • You must be registered for the conference for your Manuscript Mart session to be scheduled.
  • Download and print the Manuscript Mart Cover Sheet, which you may download from the "Online Registration" form listed at ncwriters.org. Mail it with two hard copies of your submissionto:

    North Carolina Writers' Network
    Manuscript Mart
    PO Box 954
    Carrboro, NC 27510

  • Checklist: two copies of manuscript; registration form; check to cover Manuscript Mart ($150) (and a separate check to cover all other conference fees if you are registering for the conference through the mail).
  • NOTE: If Manuscript Mart fills, your check will be returned to you, minus related charges.

Manuscript Mart Reviewers

From the names below, select your first, second, and third choice on your registration form. We will try to accommodate your first choice; if we cannot, we will select an appropriate editor or agent for you. You will be notified two weeks before the conference as to your assigned editor or agent, and the time and location of your session.

 
Manuscript Mart
Download Manuscript Mart Cover Sheet

Saturday, November 21, 9:00 am–5:00 pm
Sunday, November 22, 9:00 am–1:00 pm

Stephen Kirk, John F. Blair, Publisher (regional nonfiction, fiction)
Ellen Pepus, Signature Literary Agency (fiction, creative nonfiction)
Peter Steinberg, The Steinberg Agency (fiction, creative nonfiction)
Betsy Thorpe, Novello Festival Press (regional nonfiction, fiction)
Kevin Morgan Watson, Press 53 (short fiction, poetry)


Critique Service

Register online here | Download a registration form

Advanced Registration is now closed. Walk in registrations will be available on site starting Friday, November 20th at 4 pm.

The Critique Service provides writers with in-depth literary critique of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and screenplays, from a seasoned faculty member writer. A one-on-one, twenty-five-minute review session will be scheduled for you, to take place on Saturday, November 21, from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm or Sunday, November, 22, between 9:00 am and 1:00 pm.

Note: Manuscript Critiques are schedules on a first-come, first-served basis. You must register for a critique by mail, with manuscript and payment enclosed, by November 2, 2009 (RECEIVED BY DATE).

Guidelines

  • Submit twenty double-spaced pages of your fiction, nonfiction, or screenplay manuscript (for book-length projects, you must include a one-page synopsis of the work as a whole), or ten pages of poetry. Make sure your name is on each page of your submission. NUMBER YOUR PAGES.
  • All prose submissions must be double-spaced with 12-point font, on 8 1/2 x 11 inch paper, 1 inch margins; poetry submissions should include no more than one poem per page.
  • Download and print the Critique Service Cover Sheet, which you may download from the "Online Registration" form at ncwriters.org. Mail it with two hard copies of your submissionto:

    North Carolina Writers' Network
    Fall Conference Critique Service
    PO Box 954
    Carrboro, NC 27510

  • Checklist: two copies of manuscript; check to cover Critique Service ($150). You must be registered for the Fall Conference before we schedule your critique.
  • NOTE: If Critique Service fills, your check will be returned to you.

From the names below, select your first, second, and third choice. We will try to accommodate your first choice; if we cannot, we will select an appropriate critiquer for you. You will be notified two weeks before the conference as to your assigned critiquer, and the time and location of your session.

 

Critique Sessions
Download Critique Service Cover Sheet

Saturday, November 21, 9:00 am–5:00 pm
Sunday, November 22, 9:00 am–1:00 pm

Lavonne Adams (poetry)
Philip Gerard (fiction, nonfiction)
Lisa Williams Kline (children’s)
David Perry (nonfiction)
Samm-Art Williams (playwriting, screenwriting)

 
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