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Spring Conference 2008 was held at Elliott University Center in Greensboro, NC. The conference is over, but we have left this conference information on the site so that you can refer to it as a model of what our Spring Conference is like.

The North Carolina Writers' Network and the Center for Creative Writing in the Arts bring you a full day of workshops on the campus of the University of North Carolina- Greensboro. We're giving you more of what you've asked for -- small classes, top writing faculty, and intensive workshops in fiction, memoir, poetry, and publishing.

Keynote: Linda Gregg

Spring Conference 2008 is made possible with support from the Center for Creative Writing in the Arts, UNC-Greensboro, and the North Carolina Arts Council.
UNC Greensboro NC Arts Council


Conference Classes

New! All-Day Workshops with

Intensive Half-Day Workshops with

Choose one of the all-day workshops, which meet in the morning and resume after lunch.

Or

Choose from among the half-day workshops and select one class for the morning session and another class for the afternoon session.

Either way,

  • Morning sessions from 9:00 - 10:30am
  • Publishing Panel from 10:45 - 12:15
  • Lunch with an Author! - Keep the conversations going
  • Afternoon sessions from 1:30 - 3:00pm
  • Keynote from 3:30 - 4:30pm *Open to the Public!
  • Faculty readings from 4:45 - 5:45pm *Open to the Public!
  • Publishers Exhibits open all day

See the schedule for more information about the day's activities.

Register Here

(this link requires that pop-ups be enabled. You may also register by pasting the following URL into your browser's address field: https://www.ncwriters.org/reg/springConferenceForm2008.php)

Print a registration form: PDF or Word


Costs

Early registration ends Thursday, April 17. Members may register on-site April 26 for $135.

Early registration: On-site registration as a walk-in:
  • $135 for members
  • $165 for non-members

Scholarships

A limited number of scholarships are available for the Spring Conference. If you would like to apply for a scholarship, please send a letter of interest to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . Details will be forthcoming.

Cancellations

Cancellations must be made in writing and arrive at the Network office by 4 pm, Thursday, April 17, for you to receive a 50% refund. Send request to NC Writers' Network, Box 954, Carrboro, NC 27510.

No refunds for cancellations received after April 17 or for no-shows.

Nearby Hotels

For favorable rates at the following hotels, mention that you are attending an event at the University of North Carolina-Greensboro.


Faculty Biographies: Spring Conference 2008



Keynote

Linda Gregg Linda Gregg is the author of six books of poems: Too Bright to See, Alma, Things and Flesh, Chosen by the Lion, The Sacraments of Desire, and In the Middle Distance. She is the recipient of many awards and honors, including a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Whiting Award, a National Endowment for the Arts grant, the PEN/Voelcker Award, and several Pushcart Prizes. Her work has appeared in The Atlantic, The Paris Review, The New Yorker, and The Kenyon Review.

Fiction Faculty

Valerie Neiman Valerie Nieman is the author of a collection of short stories, Fidelities, from West Virginia University Press, featuring stories that first appeared in The Kenyon Review, Arts & Letters, West Branch, and other journals and anthologies. Her most recent short fiction publication came in a special American Apocalypse issue of Green Mountains Review. Her first novel, Neena Gathering, was a science fiction paperback that was translated for the Brazilian market. Her second novel, Survivors, was a story of family dysfunction in a Rust Belt town in the 1970s, and she recently completed Feral, a novel set in North Carolina. A poetry collection, Wake Wake Wake, was published in 2006 by Press 53, including work published in two chapbooks, and in Blackbird, Poetry, New Letters, REDiViDER, and in numerous anthologies. A former newspaper reporter and editor, she continues to free lance articles on travel and sailing. She has received an NEA creative writing fellowship, two Elizabeth Simpson Smith prizes in fiction, and the Greg Grummer Prize in poetry. A graduate of the M.F.A. program at Queens University of Charlotte, she teaches writing at N.C. A&T State University.
Travis Mulhauser Travis Mulhauser lives and writes in Durham. His first book, Greetings from Cutler County: A Novella & Stories was published in May 2005 by the University of Michigan Press. The first chapter of his novel Sweetboy will appear in this May's issue of roger magazine. He teaches at Johnston Community College and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.
Craig Nova Craig Nova is the author of eleven novels, all of which have been widely translated. He has received an Award in Literature from the American Institute of Arts and Letters, a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Harper-Saxton Prize, and other awards. His short fiction has appeared in Esquire and The Paris Review and has been included in The Paris Review Anthology and The Best American Short Stories. He is currently the Class of 1949 Distinguished Professor of the Humanities at the University of North Carolina Greensboro.

Poetry Faculty

Anjail Rashida Ahmad Dr. Anjail Rashida Ahmad is currently the director of the New Creative Writing @ A&T program at North Carolina A&T State University. As a poet who experiences blindness, she seeks to link her knowledge of the sighted world with her perceptions through blindness with life’s invitation to get involved with living fully in every moment. In 2007 she was one of two NC artist to win a Headlands Center for the Arts Residency and a NC Arts Council Artist Grant, she was also elected to the board of the NC ACLU. She has also received the Margaret Walker Alexander Award for Poetry, the Robert Frost Prize in Poetry, the Southern Literary Festival Prize for Poetry and two Janef Preston Prizes for Poetry from the Academy of American Poets.
Costa Rican-American Mark Smith-Soto is Director of the Center for Creative Writing in the Arts at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, where he edits International Poetry Review. He was 2005 winner of a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship in creative writing, and his poetry has appeared in many journals. His award-winning chapbooks include Green Mango Collage and Shafts, and his full-length collections include Our Lives Are Rivers (University Press of Florida, 2003) and Any Second Now (Main Street Rag Press, 2006).
   
 
   

Creative Nonfiction Faculty

William R. (Bill) Trotter wrote his first novel (not publishable, of course, but a senior editor at Viking Press liked it well enough to become a valued mentor over the next ten years) at the age of fourteen and hasn’t looked back in all the forty-five years since. Since 1983 he has, in fact, earned his entire living by the sweat of his keyboard. In 2004, the North Carolina English Teachers’ Association chose him to be the first recipient of a special “Lifetime Achievement Award."
Lee Zacharias Recent nonfiction by Lee Zacharias has appeared in Shenandoah, Michigan Quarterly Review, The Gettysburg Review, Southern Humanities Review, and North Carolina Literary Review among other journals and is regularly cited in the annual Best American Essays. Her books include Helping Muriel Make It Through the Night (stories) and the novel Lessons. A former fellow of the National Endowment for the Arts and the North Carolina Arts Council and recipient of several teaching awards, she is a professor of English at the University of North Carolina Greensboro.

Publishing Faculty

Before he became Executive Director of the North Carolina Writers' Network, Ed Southern was the vice president of sales & marketing for John F. Blair, Publisher.

 


Keynote: Spring Conference 2008

Linda Gregg Linda Gregg is the author of six books of poems: Too Bright to See, Alma, Things and Flesh, Chosen by the Lion, The Sacraments of Desire, and In the Middle Distance. She is the recipient of many awards and honors, including a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Whiting Award, a National Endowment for the Arts grant, the PEN/Voelcker Award, and several Pushcart Prizes. Her work has appeared in The Atlantic, The Paris Review, The New Yorker, and The Kenyon Review.

 


Faculty Reading and Booksigning: 4:45 - 5:45

Faculty readings are a great way to get to know a writer better, enjoy dipping into new genres, support the careers of other writers, and get inspired for your own work.

The faculty reading is followed by a booksigning, your chance to speak with writers you admire while you get your book signed.

Faculty books are for sale all day long at the Barnes & Noble table. One of the best ways to support writers and build your own network is to get connected by reading the works of faculty you admire!


Member Book Sales: Spring Conference 2008

Information to come.


All-Day Workshops: Spring Conference 2008
Saturday, April 26

To register for an all-day workshop, choose between the workshops listed below. The workshop will meet in the morning, and then resume after lunch.

Register Here

(this link requires that pop-ups be enabled. You may also register by pasting the following URL into your browser's address field: https://www.ncwriters.org/reg/springConferenceForm2008.php)

Print a registration form: PDF or Word

ALL-DAY FICTION WORKSHOP: Dialog as Combat: Developing Urgency in Your Work, with Valerie Nieman
Part 1 - 9:00 - 10:30 am
Part 2 - 1:30 - 3:00 pm

Of the tools we have for revealing character and furthering plot, dialog offers both immediacy and depth, action as well as access to emotional nuance. We speak to gain information and leverage. We speak to tell our own stories and to "talk it out" when we are confused. Dialog reveals and conceals, attacks and withdraws. In this day-long fiction workshop, we'll use some metaphors of combat to analyze how dialog operates in fiction. We will look at participants' submitted work and do a writing exercise over lunch to give us fresh material for discussion.

ALL-DAY NONFICTION WORKSHOP: There Is No Such Thing As a Dull Subject, with William R. Trotter
Part 1 - 9:00 - 10:30 am
Part 2 - 1:30 - 3:00 pm

Whatever your aspirations as a writer, it's almost mandatory to have a certain fluency in non-fiction unless you luck into a job so agreeable and secure that you can afford to go your own way. Unless you're dealing with extremely esoteric technical stuff (theoretical physics, say), it's always about people, in some aspect or another, and where you have people, you have "characters," just as in a novel. There's usually an angle you can play for fun or drama, without overstepping the parameters of your assigned subject matter -- it may take some digging, but it's always there!


Half-Day Workshops: Spring Conference 2008
Saturday, April 26

To register for separate morning and afternoon classes, choose from among the half-day sessions listed below. Select one class for the morning session, and another for the afternoon session.

Register Here

(this link requires that pop-ups be enabled. You may also register by pasting the following URL into your browser's address field: https://www.ncwriters.org/reg/springConferenceForm2008.php)

Print a registration form: PDF or Word

 

Morning Classes, 9:00 - 10:30 am (choose one)

FICTION WORKSHOP: Cart and Horse: A Discussion of Plot and Character in Fiction, with Travis Mulhauser

David Huddle wrote that of all the elements of fiction, "character is the company of other human beings, the experience of living." Clearly no blueprint exists for creating the next Holden Caulfield, but in this workshop we'll discuss and apply techniques that can help you build characters that will ultimately drive your fiction.

PUBLISHING WORKSHOP: The Writer/Author Divide, with Ed Southern

Writers have to be comfortable with solitude in order to write. Authors have to be comfortable with crowds at book signings and other public events. How does one person play both roles?

POETRY WORKSHOP: Our Daily Bread: Writing a Manuscript One Poem at a Time, with Anjail Rashida Ahmad

 

I tell my writing students that there is no such thing as writer’s block unless we choose to give in to it by not writing. So if the muse is no longer stopping by, what can we do to conjure her creative stream? The cure: build your manuscript by writing one poem a day. In this workshop we will explore methods for keeping the pen moving even when you might not feel inspired. You will go away with the means to generate enough new material for a collection of poems by building on what we begin here.It has been said that our willingness to write anything can lead to the creation of great poetry.

 

Publisher Panel, 10:45 - 12:15 pm

PUBLISHER PANEL, with Ed Southern (moderator), former vice president for sales and marketing, John F. Blair, Publishers

 

Lunch with an Author:, 12:30 - 1:30 pm

Lunch on your own OR "Lunch With an Author": A new chance for the Network to network. From 8 - 9 am, registrants can sign up to join a group of no more than 10 who will take one of our faculty members out to lunch for some good company and informal conversation. Participants will split the cost of their author's lunch, as well as paying for their own meal.

Afternoon Classes, 1:30 - 3:00 pm (choose one)

FICTION WORKSHOP: The Craft of Fiction, with Craig Nova *This class is full

 

The Craft of Fiction will cover structure, language, character, plot, and other elements. The emphasis will be on using these items as tools to discover what it is the author wants to say and how to make a story better.

POETRY WORKSHOP: Lose Your Mind, Come To Your Senses, with Mark Smith-Soto

Nothing diminishes the impact of our words more than the presentation of ideas, attitudes and expressions of emotion that are not rooted in the immediacy of sensory impressions. In this workshop, we will explore ways to infuse the breath of life into the language of our poetry.

CREATIVE NONFICTION WORKSHOP, with Lee Zacharias

 

This workshop will include a discussion of the range of the genre, examples of ways creative nonfiction can be structured, and such issues as truth and fiction in creative nonfiction. It will also include suggestions for reading and an in-workshop writing exercise.


Spring Conference 2008 Schedule

Register Here

(this link requires that pop-ups be enabled. You may also register by pasting the following URL into your browser's address field: https://www.ncwriters.org/reg/springConferenceForm2008.php)

Print a registration form: PDF or Word

Saturday, April 26
8:00 - 9:00am Registration
Exhibit Tables Open, Book Sales
9:00 - 10:30am

Morning Classes:
Mulhauser - Fiction
Rashida Ahmad - Poetry
Southern - Publishing
Trotter - Nonfiction, Part 1
Neiman - Fiction, Part 1

10:45am - 12:15pm Publisher Panel - Southern (moderator)
12:15 - 1:30pm Lunch on your own OR "Lunch With an Author": A new chance for the Network to network. From 8 - 9 am, registrants can sign up to join a group of no more than 10 who will take one of our faculty members out to lunch for some good company and informal conversation. Participants will split the cost of their author's lunch, as well as paying for their own meal.

Elliott Center Food court and Commons
Link: http://euc.uncg.edu/services/foodcourt/
Exhibit Tables Open, Book Sales
1:30 - 3:00pm Afternoon Classes:
Nova - Fiction
Smith-Soto - Poetry
Zacharias - Creative Nonfiction
Trotter - Nonficton, Part 2
Neiman - Fiction, Part 2
3:30 - 4:30pm Keynote - Linda Gregg
4:45 - 5:45pm Faculty Readings and Book Signing
5:30 - 6:00pm Exhibit Tables Open, Book Sales

 

 

 
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