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Drew PerryGREENSBORO, NC—Warp, weave. Thieve and lie. Hearts that beat—and break. Fiction is action, and a good story demands a writer's best verbs. Need proof? Just check out the titles of the fiction course offerings at the upcoming North Carolina Writers' Network 2014 Spring Conference on Saturday, April 12, at UNCG. 

Nancy Peacock, author of the novel The Life & Times of Persimmon Wilson, will lead the Two-Part Fiction Workshop. The title? "The Warp and Wave of Fiction."

Two-part workshops meet twice during the conference, once during Workshop Session I (in the morning) and again for Workshop Session II (in the afternoon). Peacock, whose first novel Life Without Water was chosen as a New York Times Notable Book, says about her course:

Writing good fiction is not the same as laying a brick wall: first the characterization brick, then the setting brick, then the action brick. Instead, all the elements (character, plot, setting, action, structure, description, emotion, and more) must work together to form the tapestry of storytelling. In this class we will examine successful storytelling through reading and commenting on students' work and the work of published writers, as well as through class exercises.

In addition Drew Perry will lead a fiction workshop titled "Thieves & Liars: How We Build the World."

Nancy PeacockThis workshop will address something critical to the crafting of stories and novels: When and how to steal from the world around us (hint: early and often), and when to make things up (another hint: when the story demands it). Registrants will talk about how things like landscape, humor, oddity, and stray detail are often the most important ways of entering into a piece of work—and keeping it alive in draft after draft after draft. Another way of thinking about this: attendees will talk about how to use their own strange obsessions most productively in their writing. So someone really loves, say, tractors. Or tigers. And they keep appearing on the page. Registrants will find ways to make that feel less weird, and more like they're working.

Perry is the author of two novels: This Is Just Exactly Like You, which was a finalist for the Flaherty-Dunnan First Novel Prize from the Center for Fiction and an Atlanta Journal Best of the Year pick for 2010, and Kids These Days, just published by Algonquin Books. He teaches writing at Elon University and holds an MFA from the writing program at UNC-Greensboro.

In the afternoon session, Kim Church will lead a fiction workshop titled "The Beating, Breaking Hearts of Fictional Characters." Church's debut novel, Byrd (Dzanc Books, March 2014), is the fragmented family history of a child secretly given up for adoption.

Kim ChurchThe heart of fiction is character; but what is the heart of a fictional character? How is it revealed to the writer, and how does the writer express it? This workshop, for fiction writers at all levels, will focus on how to create characters that are unique, lively, and memorable—characters we might like to spend time with after the workshop is over. To prepare for this session, registrants should think of a memorable event from their own life—something that touched or scared or excited or confused or changed or defined them in some small way. Something they don’t mind sharing with others, a moment they’d like to put in a time capsule. Attendees should not write about it beforehand, but come with an idea. And paper and pen.

Registration is now open. The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

Jonathan FarmerGREENSBORO, NC—“Whenever you feel an impulse to perpetrate a piece of exceptionally fine writing, obey it—whole-heartedly,” said Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch in his 1913-1914 collected lectures, On the Art of Writing, “and delete it before sending your manuscript to press. Murder your darlings.”

The first cut is the kindest cut—as are the second and third (and fourth). That's the theme of this year’s Two-Part Creative Nonfiction Workshop at the North Carolina Writers’ Network 2014 Spring Conference, led by Jonathan Farmer, titled “The Kindest Cut: Writing Energetic Nonfiction.” Registration is now open.

Two-part workshops meet twice during the conference, once during Workshop Session I (in the morning) and again for Workshop Session II (in the afternoon). Farmer, Editor-in-Chief and Poetry Editor of At Length magazine and the poetry critic for Slate, describes his course as follows:

When we’re working from reality, the need to say what happened puts a lot of pressure on our style. In this workshop, we’ll experiment with cutting a surprising number of words from our own and each other’s writing in order to uncover some of the possibilities we’ve already woven into our prose. We’ll also look at examples of efficient nonfiction writing for models of the ways we can answer the pressure to say everything with language that carries the weight and vitality of our reckoning. All participants should bring at least five copies of a double-spaced excerpt from a nonfiction project—ideally one that you’re currently working on—that’s between 500 and 750 words long. (It’s fine if it cuts off suddenly.)

In addition, Steve Mitchell and Carol Roan will lead a workshop titled “Writing from Experience.”

Steve MitchellWriting is more than something that happens in our heads. Every element of our selves has a voice we might use. How do we engage this wealth of experience in our writing? This workshop will use short exercises and prompts to open up the question. This workshop will be great for those interested in creative nonfiction—but also for fiction writers and poets as well.

Carol RoanSteve Mitchell is the Pushcart-Prize nominated author of the short-story collection, The Naming of Ghosts (Press 53). Award-winning writer Carol Roan’s most recent books are Speak Up: The Public Speaking Primer (Press 53) and When Last on the Mountain: The View from Writers over 50 (Holy Cow! Press).

The North Carolina Writers’ Network 2014 Spring Conference will be held Saturday, April 12, in the MHRA Building at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

 

 

MHRA Building, UNCGGREENSBORO, NC—Pre-registration for the 2013 North Carolina Writers' Network's annual Spring Conference is now closed, but attendees can still register on-site Saturday, April 13, at 8:30 a.m., at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

The 2013 Spring Conference will move into a new home in UNCG’s Moore Humanities and Research Administration (MHRA) Building. Located at the corner of Spring Garden and Forest Streets, the MHRA Building offers easier access to those coming from off-campus.

In addition, UNCG’s Creative Writing Program—a co-sponsor of the Spring Conference—will provide free parking for registrants in the adjacent Oakland Avenue Parking Deck.

The NCWN Spring Conference draws writers, at all levels of skill and experience, from across North Carolina and beyond for a full day of workshops in fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, and the business side of writing. Attendees will be treated to faculty readings and can share their own work at the open-mic reading. They also can sign up for “Lunch with an Author,” their chance to engage in informal conversation with accomplished writers.

Conference-goers this year will need to pre-register for “Lunch with an Author,” as there will be no on-site registration available for this conference offering. Food will be provided, so that participants can spend less time waiting in line, and more time talking with the author of their choice. (Spaces in “Lunch with an Author” are limited, and are first-come, first-served.)

Courses include two all-day, two-session workshops: “Animating Fiction” with Lee Zacharias, and a creative nonfiction workshop, “Writing Personal Essays and Memoir.” One-session course offerings will be led by John McNally and Lynn York (fiction), Scott Huler and Cynthia Nearman (creative nonfiction), and Carolyn Beard Whitlow and John Rybicki (poetry). Scott Nicholson will teach a class on self-publishing e-books, while Terry L. Kennedy and Ross White will lead a workshop for “Authors as Entrepreneurs.”

100 Poems by 100 Poets (Unicorn Press)In the afternoon, a Publishing Panel including Stephen Kirk of John F. Blair, Publisher, Robin Miura of Carolina Wren Press, and Kevin Morgan Watson of Press 53, will answer questions about what they look for in a manuscript and the evolving realities of 21st Century publishing. After looking ahead to the future of books, Andrew Saulters of Greensboro’s Unicorn Press will close the day with a look back, leading a hands-on demonstration of traditional bookbinding, so that conference registrants can turn their well-crafted words into well-crafted objects.

Registration is available online at www.ncwriters.org or by calling 336-293-8844.

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blood & Parcels by T.Q. Bernier

Lulu Publishing
$23.99, paperback / $3.99, e-book
ISBN: 978-1-4834-0438-7 (pb) / 978-1-4834-0439 (e-book)
January, 2014
Family Saga/Drama
Available from www.Amazon.com

"Blood & Parcels is a wonderfully conceived and eloquently orchestrated epic tale of one family’s generational journey through time. Masterfully and skillfully rendered characters are weaved in a story with extraordinary vivid details set in the 1800s and culminating in the present, punctuated with intense familial love and loyalty. It is engaging and captivating in its totality, leaving the reader thirsty for more. Every so often, amid the throngs of published authors, there emerges a talent so pure that it cannot be perceived as anything other than brilliant. Bravo!"
—Marie Rose Rivera, Stay-at-Home Mom and Entrepreneur

"T.Q. Bernier’s novel, Blood & Parcels, takes the reader on a journey through history filled with adventure and intrigue. With stories of honor, betrayal, love found and love lost, and finally to a place of redemption. Her characters are highly complex. As she develops the multiple layers to their personalities, the reader is consumed with a sense of urgency to know what happens next. You are caught up in the trials, tribulations and sheer will for survival of these characters. Their sense of honor and loyalty to family runs deep through this narrative. For someone whose family history in many ways follows a similar path, it was fascinating to get caught up in familiar places and surnames. A true testament to this great adventure is that the author leaves you wanting more....Congratulations, T.Q. Bernier!! From an American woman, who as well, is so proud of her French Caribbean Heritage. Well Done!"
—Rosemarie Danet Correa, RFID Project Manager, United Space Alliance, Kennedy Space Center and President of Florida French Connection

"I have just finished reading Blood & Parcels, and 'Wow' is all I can say. I was thoroughly captivated by the characters, absorbed right into the times and places, felt the pain, the love, and the joy. T.Q. Bernier, I want more! I can’t wait for your next novel. I definitely recommend Blood & Parcels to everyone for a fabulous read."
—Marilyn Pearson, Business Owner, Appliances Plus

Catherine never anticipates that her marriage to Jonah Dusant would be a death blow to the Dusant business empire. Amid the heat of a brewing war between nineteenth-century Germany and France, her union with the powerful family exposes deadly secrets. From the high court of France to the pristine shores of the U.S. Virgin Islands, Blood and Parcels crosses five generations and spans a continent to tell the story of the inescapable bonds of family and ancestral duty. It weaves a riveting tale of love, lust, daunting loss, difficult decisions, betrayal and murder.

Of French, Caribbean descent, T.Q. Bernier was born in St. Thomas, United States Virgin Islands. She worked in the banking industry specializing in mortgage loan underwriting and retired in 2012 from one of the largest banks in the U.S. and British Virgin Islands to pursue her writing career. She and her husband, James, have three children and reside in Cary, North Carolina.

Regarding My Son

Regarding My Son by Sonia Usatch-Kuhn

Finishing Line Press
$14.00, paperback
May, 2014
Poetry
Available for pre-order from the publisher

"Sonia Usatch-Kuhn's memorable chapbook, Regarding My Son, is the odyssey of a mother and son through and beyond the 'barren pit' of schizophrenia. The mother-speaker is habitually, often desperately, 'frozen outside' of her beloved son's 'blackened confusion,' herself at every moment about to detonate. In prayerful language, at once poised at the brink of desperation and dogged hope—without a whit of sentimentality, cold-eyed, often fierce, always permeated with love—Usatch-Kuhn inches the reader ever closer to the stunning feat that only poetry can achieve—the ultimate triumph of recovery: 'I open my eyes / caress your cheek / weave you whole again.' These poems brave utterance in face of the direst odds. Such courage."
—Joseph Bathanti, Poet Laureate of North Carolina

"Sonia Usatch-Kuhn has created a heartbreaking—and ultimately, heartwarming—portrait of a mother's love for her son, the loss that she endures as a result of his schizophrenia, and, finally, hope for the future. As the book unfolds, we travel with this mother into the recesses of her son's illness; we visit him in the psych unit, where she writes, 'I look for promise…' We cheer for him as he comes home on a day pass, laugh when he cracks a joke, and understand when, in 'The Untying,' she writes: 'I have been pregnant/too long with you….' There are ample rewards here for the reader, none more moving than the final poem, 'The Reward,' in which a jagged timeline is presented, from the depths of 1978 to the joy of the son's college graduation in 2012. Haunting and memorable, this book deserves a wide audience."
—Judy Goldman, author of Losing My Sister

“In Regarding My Son, Sonia Usatch-Kuhn portrays a mother’s emotional journey into her son’s schizophrenic world. She accompanies her son faithfully, no matter how distant he seems or how disheveled he becomes, hoping always 'to weave you whole again,' until at last he emerges with her into a new world of light and language and love. Usatch-Kuhn’s poems shoot straight to the heart, each one a tiny, but crystal clear, window into her years of disappointment, pain, endurance, faith, and ultimately her joy as her son achieves 'affection / self-reliance / independence / leadership…' These are strong poems, spoken with a powerful and distinctive voice.”
—Jack Coulehan, MD, author of Bursting With Danger and Music

Regarding My Son is a journey in poetry about my son's diagnosis of schizophrenia through his recovery and college graduation in 2012. The poems deal with the issues of my observations of the hospital wards, the pain, hopelessness, stigma, hope, fear, wonder, frustration, doubt, and the process toward recovery as we took the path hand in hand.

Sonia Usatch-Kuhn, in facing the blank page, found release for the myriad feelings she experienced when her son Lance was diagnosed with schizophrenia thirty-five years ago. She is grateful to him for generously agreeing that these poems be shared. Some have appeared in The Journal of Poetry Therapy, Poetic Medicine: The Healing Art of Poem-Making, on the CD Woman In Darkness, The Best of Raleigh Reading Series, and The Best of Fuquay-Varina Reading Series. Main Street Rag and What the Fiction Journal published short stories. She authored Noodle Kugel & Life’s Other Meichels, compiled and edited Living in the Rooms of our Lives, and The Book of Asher: Memoirs of a Passionate Jewish Life. She taught Healing & Madness at SUNY Stony Brook School of Medicine. Sonia has garnered praise for her portrayal of characters on Community Theater stages.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Goddess Spells for Busy Girls by Jen McConnel

Weiser Books
$14.95, paperback
ISBN: 978-1-578635481
February, 2014
Nonfiction
Available from your local bookstore or www.Amazon.com

Goddess magic is powerful magic: with the help of the right goddess, simple spells can yield amazing results. In Goddess Spells for Busy Girls, Jen McConnel offers eighty spells imbued with the vibrant force of twenty-five goddesses from around the globe.

McConnel provides an introduction to twenty-five celestial ladies, to make sure you are asking the right goddess for help: Athena for memory retention, Aphrodite to gain confidence, Persephone to find you path, and Sekhmet to prevent illness. Each section includes the history and lore behind the goddess, and three simple spells to invoke her help.

For the busy young woman who wants it all but needs help getting it, Goddess Spells for Busy Girls can help you achieve love, balance, protection, and abundance in your life.

Jen McConnel first began writing poetry as a child. A Michigander by birth, she now lives and writes in the beautiful state of North Carolina. When she isn't crafting worlds of fiction, she teaches college writing composition and yoga. Once upon a time, she was a middle school teacher, a librarian, and a bookseller, but those are stories for another time. Visit http://www.jenmcconnel.com to learn more.

 

Beth's Birds

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beth's Birds by Deanna K. Klingel
Illustrated by Steve Daniels

Peak City Publishing
$11.99, paperback
ISBN: 978-1-9-357-11377-7
February, 2014
Children's, Picture Book
Available from the author

Little Beth shows how she recognizes and names her backyard feathered friends. Her antics are delightfully illustrated by Steve Daniels. This is the first in the series of Little Beth Books, backyard nature for pre-K—2nd grade.

NCWN Member Deanna K. Klingel lives in the western corner of the state in Sapphire Valley with her husband Dave and golden retriever Buddy. She enjoys traveling with her books to events and schools.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Me Now - Who Next? (The Inspiring Story of a Traumatic Brain Injury Recovery) by Bill Ramsey

Lifeswrite Press
$14.95, paperback / $4.99, e-book
ASIN: B00FIE62MI
January, 2014
Memoir
Available at www.Amazon.com

Angela Leigh Tucker had not expected death that day. Newlywed, thirty years old and a successful public relations professional, she and her husband were driving home when a semi-truck hurtled over the lane divider and crushed their SUV. Her husband died on impact. She was left hanging onto life by a thin, golden thread. With her brain severely injured and her neck, shoulder, and ribs broken, she had instantly lost everything but her will to live.

In the two years following the crash, with the help of doctors, therapists, friends and family, she fought to recover and to rebuild an entirely new life. This is the inspiring story of her recovery.

Today, Angela lives independently in New York City. The injury transformed her life in many surprising and positive ways. Today, she is an advocate for millions of people who have survived and now live with their own brain injury. She has "been there" and her experience informs and inspires us all.  

During his forty year professional career, Bill Ramsey wrote technical manuals, magazine articles, and business newsletters. Retired and living in the mountains of western North Carolina, he now focuses his writing on real-life topics. This is the most recent of his books. Learn of the others at www.LifesWrite.com. "Meeting Angela for the first time just weeks after her tragic crash inspired me to research the topic of traumatic brain injury and to focus on her unrelenting and spirited battle to survive and recover. She is an amazing teacher and an inspiration. Writing about her has changed my life. Reading about her can change your life too."

Tule Publishing Group, LLC
$3.99, paperback
ASIN: B00I80NDLC
January, 2014
Publishing
Available at www.Amazon.com

"A master class in writing compelling and unforgettable fiction. Writing the Bestseller deserves a spot right beside your keyboard..."
—Elizabeth Boyle, NYT bestselling author of Love Letter from a Duke and If Wishes Were Earls

Writing the Bestseller offers practical advice and wisdom from a dozen successful authors who have sold hundreds of thousands of books, experiencing all the ups and downs of the publishing industry. What to do, what not to do, as romance and commercial fiction have their own rules.

Writing the Bestseller doesn't sugar-coat the work involved. Instead, authors who've been there tell you how to understand the genre and reader expectations. The rewards of writing a bestseller are worth the effort, and these authors share what they've learned over the years so you, too, can succeed in today's competitive market.

The contributors include NCWN member Kim Boykin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Senior Scribbles: Second Dose by Chuck Thurston

Second Wind Publishing
$9.99, paperback
ISBN: 978-1-938101915
January, 2014
Humor
Available from your local bookstore or www.Amazon.com

"Chuck Thurston is one of those rare writers who…..leads you off in one direction only to deliver you somewhere else, and it is always somewhere you find fascinating……because, though Thurston seems to be writing about himself, he turns out to be writing about you……with such generous respect for the reader that you feel both welcome and in awe, as though you've been invited into someone else's home, and through its windows is new world.

"In the same manner, these pieces redefine nostalgia…..normally presented in print as a treacly memorial to the better that once was. Thurston gently pooh-poohs this, demonstrating that the only value of the past is to bring value to the present and, rather subtly, to point to a future we need not fear.

"This then is the book you buy for a cynical friend who sees no value other than survival, and it is the book you buy for yourself when you realize your friend is not alone. Senior Scribbles.…is not an emotional how-to....it is a why to. Through laid-back humor and the sense that only what is important is important, Chuck Thurston manages to shine a gentle light on his life. That brightness illuminates ours.
—Hesh Kestin, author, The Iron Will Of Shoeshine Cats

In this series of insightful, humorous essays, Chuck Thurston delights, informs and inspires his readers. This second in a series of wide-ranging vignettes is full of misdirection, nostalgia, personal insight, warmth and beautiful writing.

Chuck Thurston is one of five brothers raised on a small farm in Pennsylvania. He served in the United States Coast Guard and flew in search and rescue seaplanes. He spent over thirty years at IBM. In earlier days, in between times, and in later years he has been: a turret lathe operator in a factory; a newspaper reporter and columnist; a pick and shovel grunt for a landscaping company; an instructor for North Carolina State University in their Industrial Extension Service. He has a BS from Elmira (NY) College, and graduate degrees from SUNY Geneseo and Appalachian State University. He is married to Heidi Wibroe Thurston from Copenhagen, Denmark. The couple lives in Kannapolis, North Carolina. Their three children are grown with families of their own, and have contributed seven grandchildren—and two greats—to the mix. He has published columns, editorials, and essays in many newspapers and periodicals. Senior Scribbles: Second Dose is his second book in this series. His first, Senior Scribbles Unearthed, is available on Amazon.

 

North Carolina Literary ReviewNORTH CAROLINA--There are only three days left for contestants to submit to the 2012 Doris Betts Fiction Prize. All entries must be postmarked by Wednesday, February 15!

This competition honors acclaimed author and North Carolina native Doris Betts, three-time winner of the Sir Walter Raleigh Award and recipient of the North Carolina Award for Literature, among many other honors. The Doris Betts Fiction Prize awards the first-prize winner $250 and publication in the North Carolina Literary Review. Finalists will also be considered for publication in NCLR.

Thomas Wolf of Chapel Hill won the 2011 Doris Betts Fiction Prize for his story "Boundaries." This was Mr. Wolf's second award, having also won in 2007 for his story, "Distance." "Boundaries" will be published in the 2012 issue of NCLR, along with the second-place story, "The Honey Wagon," by Joseph Cavano.

The 2011 competition drew nearly 100 entries. The Doris Betts Fiction Prize is sponsored by the Network and managed by the editorial staff of the North Carolina Literary Review. Published since 1992 by East Carolina University and the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association, NCLR has won numerous awards and citations.

The Doris Betts Fiction Prize
Postmark deadline: February 15 (annual)
Submissions accepted: January 1 – February 15

Eligibility and Guidelines:

 

  • The competition is open to any writer who is a legal resident of NC or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network. NCLR subscribers with NC connections (who live or have lived in NC) are also eligible.
  • The competition is for unpublished short stories up to 6,000 words. One entry per writer. No novel excerpts. No simultaneous submissions.
  • Submit story electronically via the NCLR’s online submission process. For electronic submission instructions and to start the online submission process, go to: www.nclr.ecu.edu/submissions/submit-online.html.
  • Author's name should not appear on the manuscript. Author will register with the NCLR’s online submission system, which will collect contact information and connect it to the author's submission.
  • An entry fee must be mailed to the NCLR office (address below) by the postmark deadline (February 15).
  • You may pay the Network member/ NCLR subscriber entry fee if you join the NCWN or subscribe to the NCLR with your submission: $10 (NCWN members, NCLR subscribers) or $20 (nonmembers/ nonsubscribers--must be a NC resident).
  • Checks should be made payable to the North Carolina Writers’ Network. (Separate checks should be made payable to the North Carolina Literary Review only if purchasing a subscription to the NCLR.)
  • Mail checks or money orders to:

North Carolina Literary Review
ECU Mailstop 555 English
Greenville, NC 27858-4353

  • The winner and finalists will be announced in May.
  • Questions may be directed to the NCLR at NCLRSubmissions@ecu.edu

 

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

 

Randall JarrellNORTH CAROLINA--There is only one week left to submit to the Doris Betts Fiction Prize and only three weeks left before the closing of the Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition. Time's running out, so send in your submissions!

The Doris Betts Fiction Prize awards the first-prize winner $250 and publication in the North Carolina Literary Review. Finalists will also be considered for publication. The Doris Betts Fiction Prize is sponsored by the North Carolina Writers' Network and managed by the editorial staff of the North Carolina Literary Review. For full submission guidelines, click here.

The Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition accepts one-poem submissions. The contest awards the winner $200, publication in the Crucible literary journal, and an invitation for the winner to read his or her poetry at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro’s Founders Day activities. The contest is administered by Terry L. Kennedy and the MFA Writing Program at the UNC-Greensboro. The Final Judge is Maria Hummell, author of the novel Wilderness Run (St. Martin's) and the chapbook City of the Moon (Harperprints). For full submission guidelines, click here.

Both contests are open to any writer who is a legal resident of NC or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network. NCLR subscribers with NC connections (who live or have lived in NC) are also eligible to submit to the Doris Betts Fiction Prize only.

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

Brunch Fundraiser to Honor "Blythe Spirits," Family of Writers

Carrboro, NC, 9 January 2007 – the North Carolina Writers' Network (www.ncwriters.org) is hosting a fundraiser brunch to honor writer, Will Blythe and his family on Saturday, February 10th at the Fearrington Barn beginning at 10:30 am. In addition to serving as editor of Esquire Magazine, Blythe also earned renowned for his book To Hate Like This Is to Be Happy Forever: A Thoroughly Obsessive, Intermittently Uplifting, and Occasionally Unbiased Account of the Duke-North Carolina Basketball Rivalry.

The event additionally recognizes the other literary members of the Blythe family including Will's sister, Anne and his grandfather, Literary Hall of Fame inductee, William LeGette Blythe.

The brunch occurs at the Fearrington Barn in Pittsboro, NC before the Carolina-Wake Forest basketball game on February 10th with traditional southern cuisine by Mama Dip, a reading and book signing by Will
Blythe, live Celtic Music, and a cash bar.

Will's book is getting so much buzz, with the incredible title To Hate Like This Is to Be Happy Forever, ostensibly about the Carolina-Duke basketball rivalry, but really about so much more. It's hilarious,
pensive, poignant, Southern, Northern, and altogether charming.

Like the rest of us, Will worries about his sanity. He consults famous Columbia professor Robert Thurman and ruminates, "I had to know from the point of view of a renowned scholar and practitioner of Tibetan
Buddhism whether hatred of Duke might cause me to be unduly reincarnated, forced to spend billions of years as praying mantis or a screech owl or a coyote baying at a coldhearted moon…Baying seemed an
especially apt fate."

Duke fans will be welcome at this unique event----you may want to come just to defend yourselves!

Tickets to the event are $79.00, based on Will Blythe's graduation date from Carolina in 1979.

Proceeds go to help the NC Writers' Network continue their efforts to support and connect NC writers.

For details or to reserve tickets, please call 919-967-9540.

Cold Feet by Karen Pullen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cold Feet by Karen Pullen

Five Star Cengage
$25.95, hardcover
ISBN: 978-1432826376
January 16, 2013
Mystery
Available from your local bookstore or www.Amazon.com

"“Stella Lavender [is] the appealing 26-year-old heroine of Pullen’s absorbing first mystery … Readers will hope to see a lot more of Stella in future installments.”"
Publisher's Weekly

“Stella Lavender, an SBI undercover narcotics agent, really wants to work homicide. Her boss should listen because she has both the smarts and the nerves. Karen Pullen combines good suspense with such nice touches of humor that this strong debut promises to turn into a habit-forming series.”
—Margaret Maron, award-winning author of the bestselling Deborah Knott series

"Karen Pullen of Pittsboro has just had her debut mystery published and it's a winner. The protagonist, Stella Lavender, is an undercover narcotics agent who gets pulled into a murder investigation at a local bed and breakfast. The author herself runs the Rosemary House bed and breakfast in Pittsboro so she definitely knows her stuff. Before that she was a math teacher and an engineer so she brings a wealth of different experiences to her writing which makes it all the richer."
—Sarah, Quail Ridge Books & Music

What happens when an undercover drug agent, two religious scammers, a stalkerish ex-girlfriend and a cocaine dealer attend an elegant outdoor wedding in central North Carolina? Someone gets cold feet. In this traditional mystery, SBI agent Stella Lavender investigates her first homicide. BookList: “The fast pace; multiple plot strands, which work together nicely; and the well-drawn characters, including strong-willed, intelligent Stella, distinguish this promising new series.”

Karen Pullen left a perfectly good job at an engineering consulting firm to make her fortune—(er, maybe not)—as an innkeeper and a fiction writer. Her B&B has been open for twelve years, and she's published short stories in Every Day Fiction, Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine, Outreach NC, and Spinetingler. She lives in Pittsboro. Her website is www.karenpullen.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Macaroni Ponytail by Irene Menendez

Authorhouse
$19.95, paperback / $3.99, e-book
ISBN: 978-1-4772-8589-3
November, 2012
Children's Illustrated Story Book
Available from your local bookstore, the publisher, and Amazon.com

This inspired and true story began when our grandchildren, Emily and Speight, visited my husband Bill and me during the summer of 2012. Our daughter Jennifer challenged us to potty train Emily while she was visiting. The challenge turned out to be both fun and successful, with all of us collaborating as the amazing experience developed. We want to share this experience with others in the hopes that it will spark imaginations everywhere so children can be potty trained in a fun and fanciful way. We thank you for reading Macaroni Ponytail and hope you and your child enjoy it as much as we enjoyed experiencing and writing it. (Irene Menendez)

Irene Menendez and her husband Bill called Long Island, New York, home for over forty years where they both had careers in corporate America. They are now retired and enjoying life in Wilmington, North Carolina. Irene loves to create and Bill’s passion is golf. They never suspected they would start writing children’s books. Macaroni Ponytail is the first in a series of children’s books inspired by their experiences with their grandchildren Emily and Speight. Their goal in sharing these stories is to stimulate and spark imaginations everywhere.

Shadows Trail Them Home by Scott Owens and Priscilla Campbell

Clemson University Press
$15.00, paperback
ISBN: 0-978-9835339-7-9
December, 2012
Poetry
Available from the publisher

"Shadows Trail Them Home is an excellent and compelling novel in poetry, an important contribution to the cultural canon of American life, presented in an engaging but disturbing context. It needs to be read by a wide audience, not only those who have faced abuses as children, as the two main characters have and, consequently, suffer severe (but not disabling) life-long responses, but also by a reading public that treasures poetry that fuses superior writing with major social issues. This penetrating book is compassionately narrated, as it articulates the extent to which the past can never really be overcome, even though one may be bent on altering it."
—Ronald Moran, author of The Jane Poems and Waiting

"The story of Norman and Sara exposes innumerable shades of joy and pain in our deepest human drive—the one that dances us toward, away from, but ever toward love."
—Suzanne Hudson, prize-winning author of In the Dark of the Moon

"Scott Owens and Priscilla Campbell create characters by reading our souls, create scenes by framing the pictures that live in our memories, too raw to remember, too vivid to ever completely ignore, and in these poems, they have a die-hard nonfiction writer turning pages as fast as possible to see what happens next. I didn't know poets could do that. Scott Owens and Pris Campbell can."
—Shari Smith, author of Gunpowder, Cowboy Boots, and Mascara

Scott Owens is the author of ten collections of poetry. His prior work has received awards from the Academy of American Poets, the Pushcart Prize Anthology, the Next Generation/ Indie Lit Awards, the North Carolina Writers' Network, the North Carolina Poetry Society, and the Poetry Society of South Carolina. His more than 1,100 published poems have been in Georgia Review, North American Review, Chattahoochee Review, Southern Poetry Review, The South Carolina Review, Poetry East and elsewhere. He is the founder of Poetry Hickory, editor of Wild Goose Poetry Review and 234, and vice president of the Poetry Council of North Carolina and the North Carolina Poetry Society. He has taught at the college, high school, middle school, and community levels for more than twenty-five years. Born and raised in Greenwood, South Carolina, he currently teaches at Catawba Valley Community College in Hickory, North Carolina.

The poems of Pris Campbell have been published in numerous journals. The most recent include PoetsArtists, The Dead Mule, Outlaw Poetry Network, Rusty Truck and Wild Goose Review. She has had six poetry collections published by the small press and has been included in a number of anthologies. Her most recent collections include Sea Trails, a riff from her trip down the east coast in a twenty-two-foot sailboat, published by Lummox Press, and Postscripts to the Dead, published by MiPOesias Publishing. One of her poems is featured in The Poet’s Market 2013. Nominated three times for a Pushcart Prize and numerous Best of the Net awards, she also was recently contacted by Pearson Publishing for permission to include one of her poems in their next textbook alongside Margaret Atwood. A former Clinical Psychologist, she has been sidelined by ME/CFS since 1990 and makes her home in the greater West Palm Beach, Florida. Her website is www.poeticinspire.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Book of Asher: Memoirs of a Passionate Jewish Life by Sonia Usatch-Kuhn

AuthorHouse
$41.99, paperback
ISBN: 978-1-47726-470-6
January, 2013
Memoir
Available from the publisher, your local bookstore, or Amazon.com

Asher Leon Edelstein has been described as a spirited, learned, force of nature—a complex, focused man on-the-go. He lived his life guided by seven principles: gratitude, friendship, smiles, connectedness, honor, reverence, and acceptance. Become acquainted with this Raleigh, North Carolina, dynamo, who consistently remained true to his love of Torah, family, and every stranger who crossed his path under all manner of circumstance. Feel the energy of the first Jewish basketball player for Georgia Tech, his escapades on the golf course (including Augusta), his “sweetly-filled” teaching method that endeared him to his coming-of-age bar and bat mitzvah students. Asher’s cantorial voice enthralled the congregants of Beth Meyer Synagogue. Storyteller, food lover, and mover and shaker, Asher was inspirational.

Sonia Usatch-Kuhn is the author of Noodle Kugel & Life’s Other Meichels and the editor of Living in the Rooms of our Lives. Her poems, short stories, and articles have been published in Main Street Rag, The Journal of Poetry Therapy , and numerous anthologies. She was a contributing author for Poetic Medicine: The Healing Art of Poem-Making. Usatch-Kuhn has been a correspondent for the Raleigh News & Observer's community paper, Southwest Wake News , and for the NBC produced website, MyNC.com. On Long Island, she taught second-year medical students at Stony Brook School of Medicine. She is passionate about the words of playwrights and has appeared on stage in New York, Raleigh, Durham, and Cary. She and her husband call Fuquay-Varina, North Carolina, home.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Mountains-to-Sea Trail Across North Carolina: Walking a Thousand Miles through Wildness, Culture and History by Danny Bernstein

The History Press
$19.99, paperback
ISBN : 9781609497200
February 2013 Outdoors/Fitness
Available from the publisher, your local bookstore or outdoor outfitter, and www.Amazon.com

"Remindful of Bill Bryson’s A Walk in the Woods: Rediscovering America on the Appalachian Trail, Danny Bernstein’s The Mountains-to-Sea Trail also isn’t a trail guide per se. It’s a travel book. Whereas Bryson could be dour (not to say grumpy) at times, the reader senses right away there’s no other place Bernstein would rather have been than on that trail and adjacent byways, recording the incidents and personalities, anecdotes and reflections, landscapes and legends, and natural history observations brought to life in her book. This will find its place among the front ranks of books depicting outdoor life and travel in North Carolina."
—George Ellison

The Mountains-to-Sea Trail Across North Carolina: Walking a Thousand Miles through Wildness, Culture and History focuses on the beauty, quirkiness, and vibrancy of the 1,000 miles trail from Clingmans Dome in the Smokies to Jockey's Ridge in the Outer Banks. Danny recounts her walk through North Carolina and discusses the highlights and challenges of walking the MST. Meeting people is also a vital part of walking the trail. As a mountain hiker from western North Carolina, she talks about the unexpected and unusual sights she encountered in the rest of the state and show slides.

The route takes in Frazer fir trees and pelicans, old grist and textile mills, working cotton and tobacco farms, Revolutionary War sites, and two British Cemeteries complete with Union Jacks. Author Danny Bernstein shares stories that will captivate the curious, adventurous, hiker, biker, and history and culture buff.

See the book trailer here!

Danny's mission is to get people out of their cars and hiking. Her motto is “No place is too far to walk if you have the time.” Danny plans to die with her boots on.

A committed hiker for over 40 years, she's completing the Appalachian Trail, all the trails in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the South beyond 6000, many other hiking challenges, and, of course, the Mountains-to-Sea Trail. She maintains sections of the MST and the A.T. She’s written two hiking guides, Hiking the Carolina Mountains (2007) and Hiking North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Mountains (2009) published by Milestone Press and blogs at www.hikertohiker.com.

Maureen A. Sherbondy
www.maureensherbondy.com

At an early age I set four goals for myself: (1) earn a college degree, (2) marry, (3) have three children (yes, three, I have always been very decisive) prior to thirty, and (4) publish a book.

By twenty-nine I had checked the first three items off my life’s to-do list. Item four eluded me. Get a book published. Was I crazy? What was I thinking? I hadn’t even majored in English in college. I had no publishing contacts, yet I continued to write and read and refine my craft. Alone. It was a solitary act, this writing business. I managed to send some poems and stories out and get a few pieces published. But a book! This task seemed impossible.

Then in 1996 I moved to Raleigh, North Carolina. Everywhere I went, someone was either writing or talking about writing—at the local Starbucks, in the YMCA locker room, at temple. For the four years I had lived in Pennsylvania, I had never once bumped into another writer. This state was different, though. Someone told me about the North Carolina Writers’ Network. I was so excited to hear that an active, thriving organization existed for people like me.

Soon, I signed up for my first NCWN conference and felt both excited and terrified. But the other writers, from Tony Abbott to Dave Manning, were so friendly. I remember people wore nametags with their chosen genres scrawled on their tags. This was a great conversation starter. Many friendships took root and blossomed. Writers whose work I admired taught informative, helpful classes. These workshop leaders were enthusiastic and knowledgeable. I took notes, learned how to write better, and discovered local journals. On display tables, workshop leaders and other NCWN authors exhibited their books of poetry, fiction, or essays. I remember drooling over the covers. In my head a little voice whispered, One day my book will be on that table. This tangible goal gave me something to work toward. When my mailbox overflowed with rejection letters, when I lost yet another book contest, I thought about my book displayed on that conference table.

If I had not attended the NCWN conferences, I never would have had my first book published. Every time I attended the Fall Conference, I walked the perimeter of the vendor room, where publishers set up tables and sold their books. There, I met Scott Douglass, owner and editor of Main Street Rag Publishing. Every time I returned to the conference, I talked to him, bought some of his fine books. He was publishing wonderful North Carolina poets and poets from other states.

At the 2006 conference, I once again stopped at his table and spoke with him. By this time, my work had appeared in over a hundred literary journals, and my poetry manuscript had landed on the finalist lists of several book contests. But I was frustrated, still missing that elusive book contract. Would I be sending manuscripts to book contests when I was ninety years old? Was this last goal on my list unattainable?

I will remember this next moment always. Later in the conference, as I was talking to Susan Lefler, a poet friend whom I met years earlier at another conference, Scott Douglass tapped my shoulder and said, “I don’t usually do this, but I am inviting you to submit a book to me for consideration.”

My jaw must have dropped. I could hear my heart pounding. At first, I thought he was talking to someone else. I had been waiting my whole life for someone to say these words. So, the rest is history. I sent the book, and After the Fairy Tale was published in 2007. I was ecstatic.

Until then, I had never thought beyond achieving that book publication goal. After a book is published, actually months before, the author becomes a marketer. Having a new goal of selling my book, I quickly learned that the NCWN was an extremely important promotional resource. I was able to post my Web site link on their Web site, to mention my good news in their Book Buzz, and also to announce my upcoming readings in their calendar. And, of course, I returned to the Fall Conference with my books. Standing over the display table there and seeing my first book was a preeminent life moment. On the outside I was calm and quiet, but on the inside I was jumping up and down yelling, “I did it!”

I strongly recommend joining the NCWN for writers who are interested in improving their craft, meeting a community of supportive writers, learning about the publishing universe, and promoting their books and events. The NCWN has, in Frost’s words, “made all the difference” in my book publication journey.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sam's Place: Stories by Bob Mustin

AuthorMike Ink Publishing
$14.99 paperback, $7.99 e-book
ISBN: 978-0-9852146-6-1
March 2013
Fiction
Available at your local bookstore or www.Amazon.com

Justice can be tough at Sam's Place, but the good times are better than good.

Step inside and you can play a game of eight ball, nurse a beer, or get to know a wayward preacher, a reformed hooker, an Iraq vet amputee - or Sam himself. You may watch a baby being born, see a deadly knife fight, or simply hear tall tales. But there's always a rough-hewn truth within the lies, and Sam's there to manage everything from birth to death with a righteous cant. All things considered, it isn't a bad world.

Sam's Place is a collection of interwoven short stories that revolve around a local watering hole in the Alabama town of Striven. Pull up a chair and get to know the locals in this powerful and entertaining world that is Sam's Place.

Bob Mustin has had a brief naval career and a longer one as a civil engineer, and has been a North Carolina Writers' Network writer-in-residence at Peace College under the late Doris Betts' guiding hand. In the early '90s, he was the editor of a small literary journal, The Rural Sophisticate, based in Georgia. His work has appeared in The Rockhurst Review, Elysian Fields Quarterly, Cooweescoowee, Under The Sun, Gihon River Review, Reflections Literary Journal, and many sites in electronic form. His website is www.bobmustin.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Allegiance and Betrayal by Peter Makuck

Syracuse University Press
$19.95, paperback
ISBN: 978-0-8156-1015-1
March, 2013
Short Stories
Available from your local bookstore, the publisher, or www.Amazon.com

"These stories dramatize the paradoxes of felt or forced connections as in a first kiss from a troublesome married cousin that burns the narrator’s cheek like a brand. Allegiance and Betrayal sears the reader with recognition."
—Allen Wier, author of the award-winning novel Tehano

"Makuck returns to one of the most fertile wellsprings of literature—the family. With grace and wit, he dramatizes family matters in post-World War II America, drawing attention to why families matter and what is the matter with so many of them. . . . As he points to the tragic and comic ways family members exacerbate and resolve their differences, he repeatedly surprises us with the mysterious ways people act. These stories are destined to beguile."
—Henry Hart, author of James Dickey: The World as a Lie

The stories in Allegiance and Betrayal are set in cars, on top of a water tower, in a bar, on a fishing boat, at a family farm, and at a swimming pool. Each story carries an aura of the mystery surrounding family relations, the enigma of love, the gaping rift between generations, the give-and- take between husbands and wives, and the inevitability of loss. The book begins with a suite of three stories about Tim Budney. In the first, he reluctantly leaves home and his beloved hot rod Ford to attend a small Catholic college; in the second, he experiences a conflict of allegiances—loyalty to a friend versus lying to his teacher and priest; in the third, he imagines that his uncle, a pool hustler, is in danger and returns to the uncle’s tavern where he witnesses something unforgettable. In other stories, a Yankee house painter trying to sell his car encounters a tricky, Bible-quoting southerner; a married couple hurtfully moves away from their friends of twenty years without saying goodbye or leaving an address; a near fatal scuba dive revives a friendship of many years; a family reunion turns ugly on the subject of religion; and a high school French teacher arranges an offshore fishing trip to settle a score with the football coach.

With deft prose and a generous spirit, Makuck explores the deep but subtle range of human emotion. Humorous and tender, these stories offer rich portraits of individuals struggling to overcome failed dreams and searching for an answer to the question of what truly matters.

Peter Makuck is Distinguished Professor Emeritus at East Carolina University. He is the author of Long Lens: New and Selected Poems and two collections of short stories, Breaking and Entering and Costly Habits. His poems, stories, and essays have appeared in the Georgia Review, Hudson Review, Poetry, Sewanee Review, the Nation, and Gettysburg Review.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bad Blood by Ann Phillips

CreateSpace
$12.99, paperback / $7.99, e-book
ISBN: 978-1482093896
February, 2013
Fiction
Available at www.Amazon.com

Book Two in the Revenge Series!

Nathe and Addie Watson are warned by Amps, a ghost from Nathe’s past, that the Hooper-Watson Feud might still be fermenting. Nathe thinks it’s due to Bad Blood. Bad Blood—the fact that a person is bad because of his or her blood line. Is that possible? The struggle involves Glee Hooper, his wife’s nephew, which hides activity in the mountains that’s illegal.

Their daughter, Lottie, has become an object of a bet that is meant to revenge the Watson family. Can Lottie survive her marriage? Is there anyone that can intervene and save her?

The Hooper and Watson families struggle with mistrust and betrayal. Can you settle debts involving blood, or do one of the two families need to escape from the mountains to stop the fighting?

Watch the book trailer here!

Ann Phillips is mother to five children and grandmother to fifteen. Writing has always been a part of her life, whether she was making brochures for church or her varied businesses, or just making elaborate "lists" to organize her life. Her interest in genealogy inspired this series. Revenge and Bad Blood are partially based on a story of distant family members in Jackson County, North Carolina, where a "feud" took place between the Hoopers and the Watsons. She is kin to both sides. Her mother is a Hooper. Her grandfather married a Watson. When the feud occurred, a nine-year-old boy witnessed those atrocities. His true name was believed to be Leander Watson. Her website is http://annrobbinsphillips.weebly.com.

Sharyn McCrumbGreensboro, NC – New York Times bestselling author Sharyn McCrumb will discuss “Keepers of the Legends: Writing about North Carolina” at  the 2009 North Carolina Writers’ Network Spring Conference, which takes place Saturday, April 25, from 8 a.m. until 6 p.m. in the Elliott University Center at the University of North Carolina–Greensboro.

The annual event draws more than 100 writers for intensive workshops in fiction, creative nonfiction, playwriting, poetry, publishing, and public speaking, led by distinguished writing faculty from across the nation. This year’s conference will also feature a Publishing Panel with book and journal editors, a Faculty Reading, an Open Mike Reading for conference attendees, and “Lunch with an Author,” in which attendees share lunch and personal conversation with one of the authors on the faculty.

McCrumb is an award-winning Southern writer, best known for her Appalachian “Ballad” novels, set in the North Carolina/Tennessee mountains, including the New York Times Best Sellers She Walks These Hills and The Rosewood Casket. Her novels have won the Wilma Dykeman Award for Literature, the AWA Book of the Year Award, and the AWA Best Appalachian Novel.  A North Carolina native and a graduate of UNC-Chapel Hill, McCrumb has been named a “Virginia Woman of History” for literary achievement and has won the AWA Outstanding Contribution to Appalachian Literature Award.  A film of her novel The Rosewood Casket is currently in production.

Conference participants may select from a variety of half- and full-day workshops, including “Nowhere to Hide,” a creative nonfiction workshop with Sir Walter Raleigh Award-winning writer Lee Zacharias; “Local Atmospheres,” a poetry workshop with renowned poet David Roderick; “Writing Life Stories” with author Marianne Gingher, the former director of the Creative Writing Program at UNC-Chapel Hill; and “Playwriting Improv” with playwright Alan Cook. 

Other instructors include Quinn Dalton, Jack Riggs, and Valerie Nieman on fiction; Carolyn Beard Whitlow on poetry; Carol Roan on reading and speaking for an audience; and NCWN executive director Ed Southern on nonfiction.

Registration for the conference—made possible with support from the Center for Creative Writing in the Arts, UNC-Greensboro, and the North Carolina Arts Council—is $100 for Network members, $150 for non-members.

For more information and to see a full schedule click here

To register online via our secure server click here, or call (919) 251-9140 for more information.

Brunch Fundraiser to Honor "Blythe Spirits," Family of Writers

Carrboro, NC, 9 January 2007 – the North Carolina Writers' Network (www.ncwriters.org) is hosting a fundraiser brunch to honor writer, Will Blythe and his family on Saturday, February 10th at the Fearrington Barn beginning at 10:30 am. In addition to serving as editor of Esquire Magazine, Blythe also earned renowned for his book To Hate Like This Is to Be Happy Forever: A Thoroughly Obsessive, Intermittently Uplifting, and Occasionally Unbiased Account of the Duke-North Carolina Basketball Rivalry.

The event additionally recognizes the other literary members of the Blythe family including Will's sister, Anne and his grandfather, Literary Hall of Fame inductee, William LeGette Blythe.

The brunch occurs at the Fearrington Barn in Pittsboro, NC before the Carolina-Wake Forest basketball game on February 10th with traditional southern cuisine by Mama Dip, a reading and book signing by Will
Blythe, live Celtic Music, and a cash bar.

Will's book is getting so much buzz, with the incredible title To Hate Like This Is to Be Happy Forever, ostensibly about the Carolina-Duke basketball rivalry, but really about so much more. It's hilarious,
pensive, poignant, Southern, Northern, and altogether charming.

Like the rest of us, Will worries about his sanity. He consults famous Columbia professor Robert Thurman and ruminates, "I had to know from the point of view of a renowned scholar and practitioner of Tibetan
Buddhism whether hatred of Duke might cause me to be unduly reincarnated, forced to spend billions of years as praying mantis or a screech owl or a coyote baying at a coldhearted moon…Baying seemed an
especially apt fate."

Duke fans will be welcome at this unique event----you may want to come just to defend yourselves!

Tickets to the event are $79.00, based on Will Blythe's graduation date from Carolina in 1979.

Proceeds go to help the NC Writers' Network continue their efforts to support and connect NC writers.

For details or to reserve tickets, please call 919-967-9540.

NC WRITERS’ NETWORK SPRING CONFERENCE FEATURES “THE WRITER’S LIFE”

 

CARRBORO, N.C. - The North Carolina Writers’ Network will hold its 2006 Annual Spring Conference on Saturday, May 20 at Peace College in Raleigh, N.C. from 8:30 am. until 6:30 pm.

A Writer’s Life: Blank Page to Book Tour will include workshops to help writers find inspiration for new material, refine their work, get published and promote their writing. Panels will include well-known writers and poets who will offer tales of challenges, tips on problem-solving, and wisdom on how to balance the writing life with family and other work. The conference features workshops with accomplished writers of fiction, creative nonfiction and poetry. A special feature is a workshop on poetic sequences with master poet James Applewhite. The conference also features a panel of booksellers, promoters, and agents who will give insight into the business side of writing.  

“This conference takes you through a day in the life of a writer,” says Cynthia Barnett, Executive Director of the North Carolina Writers’ Network. “From writing new pages in the morning, to conferring with fellow writers, to getting advice on the business of publishing and coaching on reading out aloud. This year’s program offers more than ever.”

The day-long conference features books for sale by Writers’ Network members and conference faculty, publishers, open mike sessions, and a raffle drawing. The day will conclude with one-on-one critiquing sessions with Bridgette Lacy, feature writer for the News & Observer; Carol Henderson, teacher and author of critically acclaimed Losing Malcolm: A Mother’s Journey Through Grief; playwright and poet Howard Craft, recipient of the North Carolina Arts Council Playwriting Fellowship and two-time winner of North Carolina Central University’s New Play Project; and Lynn York, author of novels The Piano Teacher and The Wine Maker.  

Registration for the conference is $120 for Writers’ Network members and $145 for non-members. One-on-one manuscript critiquing sessions are $75, arranged in advance.  

For more information, please visit www.ncwriters.org,  call (919) 967-9540, or email the Network at mail@ncwriters.org.

Founded in 1985, the nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is reportedly  the largest statewide literary arts organization in the country. The mission of the North Carolina Writers’ Network is to connect, promote, and lead emerging writers and established writers through workshops, conferences, and other programs and services. The Network builds audiences for literature, advocates for literacy and the literary arts and provides information and support services for writers at all levels.

Thomas Wolf (that's Wolf with no e) of Chapel Hill is the winner of the Doris Betts Fiction Prize for his story "Distance." North Carolina Literary Review editor Margaret Bauer remembers that when she saw the story come in, she thought, "With a name like that and living in North Carolina, I guess you have to be a writer." Wolf will receive a prize of $200 from the North Carolina Writers Network. Second place, $100, is awarded to Gregg Cusick for "Five is Red."

2006 Inductees to the NC Literary Hall of Fame Announced 

The North Carolina Writers’ Network (NCWN) announces three Inductees for 2006 to The North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame, a biennial program begun in 1996. Past inductions have been held at the historic Weymouth Center for the Arts & Humanities, in Southern Pines, N.C., but this year the ceremony, free and open to the public, will be at the Sheraton Imperial Hotel in Durham on Friday, November 10, at 7:30 p.m.  Please join us for an evening’s entertainment all North Carolinians can enjoy! 

To be honored are poet Gerald Barrax, poet and prose writer Fred Chappell, and journalist and mystery writer Elizabeth Daniels Squire. The Induction opens NCWN’s annual Fall Conference that 400-plus writers from beginners to published professionals are expected to attend.  Acclaimed writers Kathryn Stripling Byer, North Carolina’s Poet Laureate; James Applewhite; Shelby Stephenson; Betty Adcock; Lenard Moore; and Margaret Maron will present. UNC-TV’s “Bookwatch” host, D.G. Martin, will emcee.

Poet, teacher, and literary editor Gerald William Barrax (1933-    ) earned his B.A. from Duquesne and M.A. from the U. of Pittsburgh. He was Professor of English and Writer-in-Residence at NCSU from 1970 until his retirement in 1997; editor of Obsidian II: Black Literature in Review; and poetry editor for Callaloo, the premier African Diaspora literary journal. A major influence on young writers, Barrax has been anthologized in more than three dozen works. His noted book Leaning Against the Sun: Poems (1992) was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award. Among his other awards are the Raleigh Medal of Arts (1993) and the Sam Ragan Award for Contribution to the Fine Arts. 

Fred Davis Chappell (1936-    ), born in Canton, N.C., earned a B.A. in fiction writing and later an M.A. from Duke.  Upon graduation in 1964, he went to teach English at UNC-Greensboro, retiring in 2004 after a long and distinguished career.  Chappell is author of over forty books of poetry, fiction, and essays. He was Poet Laureate of North Carolina 1997-2002, and reviewed poetry for the Raleigh News & Observer, publishing his last column on June 25, 2006. One reviewer called him “truly a national treasure.”  Both humorist and visionary, with a gifted eye for details of character, Fred writes poetry and fiction that has earned the following accolades:  The North Carolina Award for Literature; Yale University Library’s Bollingen Prize in Poetry; France’s prestigious Prix de Meilleur des Livres Etrangers; and the T.S. Eliot Prize.  “Anybody who knows anything about Southern writing,” Lee Smith said in 2005, “knows that Fred Chappell is our resident genius, our shining light.” 

Elizabeth Daniels Squire (1926-2001), reporter, philanthropist, nationally syndicated columnist, and mystery writer, was born in Raleigh, N.C., to Jonathan Daniels and Elizabeth Bridgers Daniels. She graduated from Vassar College, then became a reporter for the New York Times. Squire published fiction and non-fiction on palmistry, mail-order shopping, journalism heroes, and crime detection. Liz told a reporter, “My life has been interesting every minute, which is why I constantly steal bits of it to weave in with my fiction—like a flood or an encounter with a rattlesnake.”  In 1994 she created the character of Peaches Dann, an absent-minded detective.  An Agatha Award winner, Liz was working on her ninth mystery at the time of her death.
 

For more details, see www.ncwriters.org.

BILLIE HARPER BUIE OF ASHEVILLE WINS THOMAS WOLFE PRIZE
 

Final judge Sharyn McCrumb selected Billie Harper Buie of Asheville, NC as the winner of the 2007 Thomas Wolfe Fiction Prize of the N.C. Writers Network, for her short story, "Shining Rock Wilderness." McCrumb praised Buie's story highly, saying, "This was a moving story, well told, and without a pat happy ending. . . . This story read as if one were hearing a real housecleaner talk about her day, and it is the convincing voice of this character, coupled with the poignant vignette of an abused child, that made 'Shining Rock Wilderness' such a memorable work." Buie will receive a $1,000 prize from the Network, and her story will be considered for publication by The Thomas Wolfe Review.   In addition to Buie, McCrumb gave honorable mentions to Jason Mott of Bolton, NC, for his story, "The Dream that was Arcadia," and to Leslie McCray of Cartersville, GA, for her story, "Climbing the Sphinx." 

McCrumb, the highly acclaimed author of two NASCAR novels, Once Around the Track and St. Dale, is perhaps best known for her Appalachian "Ballad" novels set in the North Carolina/Tennessee mountains. Her novels include New York Times Best Sellers She Walks These Hills and The Rosewood Casket, which deal with the issue of the vanishing wilderness. Other novels include The Ballad of Frankie Silver and Ghost Riders, an account of the Civil War in the Appalachians. St. Dale won a 2006 Library of Virginia Literary Award as well as the AWA Book of the Year Award. Once Around the Track will be published this June. 

Billie Harper Buie, who lives in Asheville with her husband and three children, is a member of the Great Smokies Writing program at UNC-Asheville where she has been a member of its advanced prose workshop for six years. Buie has recently had a story published in CALYX journal. She is a graduate of UNC-Chapel Hill and has an MA in landscape architecture from N.C. State. Jason Mott received his BFA from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, where his is also pursuing his MFA. McCrumb said of his story, "This story was like a day trip into a disordered mind. Creating a believable OCD character who is neither absurd nor extreme is a difficult task, and this writer managed it well." Of Leslie McCray, McCrumb wrote, ". . .this is the writer I voted 'Most Likely to Be Able To Quit Her Day Job Someday.' She writes likeable characters, and she tells a good story with a clear point to it."   McCray and her husband operate a community theatre in Cartersville, GA, where she is involved in local arts organizations. She has finished a collection of short stories, started another, and is polishing her first novel. 

The North Carolina Writers' Network serves writers at every stage of development through programs that offer ample opportunities for professional growth in skills and insight. The Network builds audiences for literature, advocates for the literary arts and for literacy, and provides information and support services. For further information or if you are interested in becoming a member please call (919) 967-9540.

"The wisest teacher of writing I know."
--Peter Elbow, from the Foreword of Writing Alone and with others by Pat Schneider
“Pat Schneider is a fuse lighter. Her work is gentle, playful, brilliant, and revolutionary. She is the real animal."--Julia Cameron, author of The Right to Write and The Artist's Way 
“Pat Schneider’s method was a wonderful revelation. There was a dramatic increase in self-confidence in the student writers in my classroom.” - Cynthia Kennison, AWA workshop leader 

 

Leader of Groundbreaking Workshop Comes to N.C. to Offer Special Opportunity to Teachers.

For teachers of creative writing workshops, for public school teachers of all grades and for anyone who works with marginalized populations, a special Sunday afternoon workshop is being offered to teachers just this year as an introduction to Pat Schneider’s groundbreaking writing techniques. Pat Schneider, the founder of the Amherst Writers & Artists Method, who had originated these workshops in a MassachusettsSewanee Review, Minnesota and, Ms. Magazine. For more about Pat Schneider and her work, see www.patschneider.com. housing project 15 years ago and now has 400 certified writing workshop leaders, will teach the class herself. She has published widely in literary journals and magazines, including Review

The workshop, Sunday, July 9, 1-5 pm will begin with a short introduction and a DVD presentation on working with young writers. Participants can receive .4 contact hours of Teacher Continuing Education credits. This four hour workshop will be held at The Peace College Campus in Raleigh, NC. and is sponsored by the N.C. Writer’s Network. The fee is $60 for the afternoon.

The North Carolina Writers Network, founded in 1985, is one of the largest statewide writer’s organizations in the nation. It fulfills its mission to connect, promote, the writing community by offering national spring and fall conferences and also critiquing services. The Network awards writers more than $30,000 annually in honoraria, competition prizes, and stipends through its competitions. For further information about the workshop, you can go to the website: www.ncwriters.org or call Virginia Freedman or Marjorie Hudson at (919)967-9540.

 

 

 

PREMIERE WRITING CONFERENCE COMING TO WINSTON-SALEM

 

Carrboro, NC, 30 Oct. 2007 – This fall, North Carolina writers are eagerly anticipating the state’s most valuable professional development opportunity to explore the publishing and writing world: The North Carolina Writers’ Network Fall Conference on Writing and Publishing. 

 

The conference runs from 5pm Friday, Nov. 16 to 1pm Sunday, Nov. 18 at the Hawthorne Inn Hotel in downtown Winston-Salem. Registration is open through Wednesday, Nov. 7. Registration ends at midnight on Nov. 7 if registering online www.ncwriters.org; it ends at 5pm if registering by calling the NC Writers’ Network at 919-967-9540. Walk-in registration is also available.

The conference features three days of classes, panels and special events on the craft of writing, techniques for getting published, and networking opportunities with editors, agents and other writers. It offers more than 35 classes and workshops; manuscript critiques with distinguished teaching  writers; pitch sessions with agents and editors; faculty readings; master classes in fiction, creative nonfiction and poetry; a cocktail reception on Friday with honored Winston-Salem guests and faculty, and more.

The keynote speaker is well-known author Jill McCorkle, a Lumberton native, at 9pm Friday. (The Jill McCorkle keynote is free and open to the public. All other speakers and events are for conferees only.) Robert Morgan (Gap Creek; Boone: A Biography), a native of Hendersonville, will give a talk at Saturday’s banquet. Winston-Salem educator and filmmaker Nathan Ross Freeman of the Winston-Salem Youth Arts Institute will perform with four young poet friends at Saturday’s luncheon. Saturday morning’s “Breakfast with Author” talk features Carole Boston Weatherford of High Point (whose latest book, Moses: When Harriet Tubman Led Her People to Freedom, is a Caldecott Honor Book) in conversation with Kim Underwood of the Winston-Salem Journal. Sunday morning’s “Breakfast with Authors” features Salisbury native and New York Times best-selling author John Hart (King of Lies; Down River) and Louise Hawes of Pittsboro, a children’s’ and short story writer whose 14 books include the new Anteaters Don’t Dream, in conversation with editor Lauren Mosko.

UNC-TV’s “Bookwatch” host D.G. Martin recently wrote, ”If you ask me, ‘How do I get published?’, my answer will be: Go to the Writers’ Network Fall Conference. Then we’ll talk…… You will rub shoulders with North Carolina literary heroes like Jill McCorkle, Robert Morgan, Randall Kenan and Tony Abbott. Over the years, this conference has been instrumental in generating publishing deals for North Carolina writers. It has a reputation as one of the best - and most affordable - conferences of its kind for writers in the country.”

The North Carolina Writers’ Network is a nonprofit organization founded in 1985 to connect, promote and lead the writing community from beginners to published professionals. Its annual conference is held in different regions of the state each year. The Network’s publications, programs and services are made possible with support from the North Carolina Arts Council.

 

Elizabeth Daniels Squire Summer Writing Residency Expanded in 2007

 

 
Carrboro, NC –From July 8 to 13, the North Carolina Writers’ Network will offer five days of writing workshops at Peace College, close to downtown Raleigh. This offering is an intimate alternative to the large summer conferences and a rare opportunity to create new bonds in your writing community, get manuscript critique, and take time to focus on generating new ideas. This year’s Writing Residency program has expanded to include four workshop areas: poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and the Amherst Writers and Artists Method. To register or for more details, please go to www.ncwriters.org or call (919) 967-9540.
 

The Elizabeth Daniels Squire Summer Writing Workshops include:

Poetry workshop : Inspiration and Crafting the Poem, with Evie Shockley
This workshop will encourage poets to identify and capitalize on their strengths, but also to step outside of their comfort zones and experiment with techniques and topics that are less familiar to them. –

Fiction workshop: Strategies and Winning Game Plans, with Bill Henderson
In this workshop, beginning and experienced writers will read and critique each other's work with particular attention to character, story or chapter structure, and style, the three key elements of a winning game plan.

Creative Nonfiction workshop : True Stories, with Sebastian Matthews .This class is designed for both beginning and advanced writers. In it, we will work with a variety of creative nonfiction forms, including personal essay and memoir. We will read and discuss published creative nonfiction, workshop each other's work and explore revision strategies.

Amherst Writers And Artists Method workshop: From Revery to Revelation -- Freeing the Voices Within, with Carol Henderson
Based on the Amherst Writers and Artists method, this workshop is appropriate for all skill levels -- from the professional, looking to discover new creative sparks, to the beginner, eager to delve into the challenges of writing for the first time. Come prepared to write a lot.  

 

The North Carolina Writers' Network serves writers at every stage of development through programs that offer ample opportunities for professional growth in skills and insight. The Network builds audiences for literature, advocates for the literary arts and for literacy, and provides information and support services.

www.ncwriters.org or call (919) 967-9540.

The North Carolina Writers' Network
Brings Creative Writing Conference to UNCG

 
Carrboro, NC – On Saturday, June 2, 2007, the North Carolina Writers’ Network will bring its annual Spring Conference for Writers to the UNCG Campus in Greensboro, NC, for the first time.  In collaboration with UNCG’s Center for Creative Writing in the Arts, the conference will feature talented area faculty and keynote Fred Chappell, past poet laureate of North Carolina.

This conference is a rare opportunity for area writers and aspiring writers to work in small-format All Day Workshops with Quinn Dalton (Fiction) and Marianne Gingher (Memoir). In addition, attendees will have access to intensive courses in Poetry (Stuart Dischell and Carolyn Beard Whitlow), Creative Nonfiction (Lee Zacharias), and Fiction (Michael Parker). Editors from Press 53, Main Street Rag Press, International Poetry Review, and the Greensboro Review will provide a panel about what it takes to get published.

Two conference events are free and open to the public:

  • Midmorning Keynote with Fred Chappell and
  • Faculty Reading and Book Signing at 4:15.

The conference will take place at the Elliott University Center, from 9 am to 5:30 pm.

Workshop attendance is limited to registrants only. For more information or to register for the conference, see www.ncwriters.org or call 919-967-9540.

The North Carolina Writers' Network serves writers at every stage of development through programs that offer ample opportunities for professional growth in skills and insight. The Network builds audiences for literature, advocates for the literary arts and for literacy, and provides information and support services. For further information or if you are interested in becoming a member please call (919) 967-9540.

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro's Center for Creative Writing in the Arts aspires to foster the efforts of those who believe in the power of the crafted word to transform and to improve our lives as individuals and as a society. The beginning wordsmith and the established word master, the student and the professional alike will find in the Center a place from which to draw strength, encouragement and support in producing their work and in finding the opportunity to share it with others.

JOSEPHINE HUMPHREYS CHOOSES WINNER FOR REINSTATED THOMAS  WOLFE PRIZE

Sherry Shaw of Gastonia, NC  is the winner of the 2006 Thomas Wolfe Fiction prize.Humphreys, the distinguished author of four widely acclaimed novels, most recently Nowhere Else on Earth (2000), also named two honorable mentions, “The Descent” by Lis Anna of Asheville, NC, and “Outside the Lines” by Therese Fowler of Raleigh, NC. A former student of Doris Betts at UNC-CH, she received her M.A. in English and Creative Writing from Hollins University, where her fiction took top honors. Shaw has won a Fellowship in Literature from the NC Arts Council and a grassroots artist grant from the United Arts Councils of  Mecklenburg /Gaston County. She lives in Gastonia with her husband and has  recently completed a novel.

“To win is a great honor,” Shaw said. “This competition is but one example of how the North Carolina Writers Network is a great resource for writers and book lovers across our state. Conferences, author readings and other events create a feeling of community that inspires me to write. You know they are there for you and they want to help you to succeed. Whether you’re a writer or simply love books, their work is key to promoting literature.”  

The first honorable mention winner, Lis Anna, is a prize-winning writer, film maker, and photographer. Her films have been screened internationally, and her photography published in Asheville Through the Seasons, a coffee table book by Twin Lights Publishers. Therese Fowler, the second honorable mention winner, is a 2005 graduate of North Carolina State University’s new creative writing MFA program. She works as editorial assistant for the literary journal, Obsidian III. 

The Thomas Wolfe Fiction Prize, one of the N.C. Writers Network’s most popular and successful competitions , had been suspended for several years, but was re-instituted in 2005 by the Board of Directors, and will be continued annually. The final judge for the 2007 Thomas Wolfe Fiction Prize has not yet been selected, but will be announced in the coming months.

Hats Off! to Heather Bell Adams of Raleigh who placed twice in the 2013 Southern Literary Contest sponsored by the Union County Writers' Club: First Place in the poetry category for her poem entitled "Empty Space;" and Second Place in the short fiction category for her short story entitled "Green River Gorge."

 

Hats Off! to Katherine Crawford who writes a weekly parenting/outdoors/general life column for The Greenville News in Greenville, SC. It runs every Thursday.

 

Hats Off! to Joan Howard who had five poems published in The Eclectic Muse: A Poetry Journal, Volume 19, Christmas 2013.

 

Hats Off! to T.Q. Bernier who recently published her debut novel. Blood & Parcels begins in nineteenth-century France amid the stirrings of World War I and follows five generations of the powerful, somewhat underhanded Dusant family from France into the sultry heat of the Caribbean.

 

Hats Off! to Laurence Holden who has two poems in winter issue of Written River: Journal of Eco-Poetics.

 

Hats Off! to Laurence Holden whose poem "Death, at Night" won Second Place (Educator Category) in the Georgia Poetry Society's annual awards. Click here to listen to Laurence read his poem.

 

Hats Off! to Sheila Webster Boneham whose essay "The 'I' States" appears in the Winter Issue of The Museum of Americana: A Literary Review. Sheila also has blogged about the essay.

 

Hats Off! to Joan Howard whose poem "Exhaustion" appears in Miller's Pond Winter Edition 2014. She also has four poems in the anthology Red Fox Run published by Ridgeline Alliance.

 

Hats Off! to Katherine Scott Crawford whose debut historical novel Keowee Valley is the #1 e-Bestseller at Amazon in the categories of western, historical, and historical romance. Keowee Valley is set in the Revolutionary-era Carolinas and in the Cherokee country. Pat Conroy calls it, "A terrific first novel."

 

Hats Off! to Catherine Carter whose poem "The Wooly Adelgid" won the Still 2013 Poetry Contest award and was published in the Fall 2013 issue.

 

Hats Off! to Jack J. Prather who earned finalist honors and a $250 prize in the 2013 Pundit Contest at www.allvoices.com. His reflections about the 50th anniversary of the assassination of John Fitzgerald Kennedy was one of 35 articles selected from 66,000 that were eligible for the contest. The judging panel included noted journalist and writer Eleanor Clift.

 

Hats Off! to Joseph Mills whose poetry chapbook Exit, Pursued by a Bear, was one of two winners in the 2013 November Pad Chapbook Challenge, sponsored by Writer's Digest. In Exit, Pursued By a Bear, Mills uses Shakespeare and stage directions to guide his poems while still trying to incorporate the November prompts.

 

Hats Off! to Alice Osborn whose poem "The Bear and the Maiden Fair" appears in Quantum Fairy Tales.

 

Hats Off! to Alice Osborn, whose poem "Southern Ice Storm" appears in GERM magazine.

 

Hats Off! to Sheila Webster Boneham whose book Drop Dead on Recall (Midnight Ink, 2012) has won the Maxwell Award for Fiction in the Dog Writers Association of America's annual competition. Three of Sheila's nonfiction books have won Maxwell's in the past.

Hats Off! to Tamra Wilson whose essay "Mayo's" will appear in the upcoming issue of The Nassau Review.

Hats Off to Joan Leotta whose short story "Cottonwood Grove" will be published by Western Trail Blazers as a single release with the option to anthologize it in the future.

Hats Off! to Joan Leotta whose short story "Red Apron" won $100 in the 2013 Intergeneration Storytelling Contest. Her story "Rings" received a Certificate of Distinction from the same contest, sponsored by the Intergeneration Foundation.

Hats Off! to Erika Hoffman: she needs your vote! Her story "The Bucket List" is one of five finalists in a weekly writing contest sponsored by Midlife Collage. Go to www.midlifecollage.com to read and comment on the stories! Then vote for it in the Closing Argument section. It's an extremely close race, and voting ends at noon on Sunday, February 3. So get out the vote! Every vote counts.

 Hats Off! to Joseph Cavano, who is proud to announce that his baby, “The Widows Tale,” has been accepted for publication. It will appear later this year in the Press 53 anthology, Everywhere Stories: Fiction from a Small Planet. Editor Cliff Garstang received over 600 submissions. The author has just completed a new short story collection he hopes to have published sometime in 2014.

 Hats Off! to Kim Church of Raleigh, author of the debut novel Byrd, will be featured at the 20th annual Virginia Festival of the Book, produced by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities. The Festival, which takes place March 19-23, is held in venues throughout Charlottesville and Albemarle County, VA, and is now the largest educational book event in the mid-Atlantic, drawing a cumulative annual attendance of more than 20,000.

Hats Off! to Joan Leotta whose poem "Around the Round Oak Table" has been accepted by Fragrance, a British publication. She first heard about the call for submissions through the NCWN website.

 

. . . to Sandra Ann Winters, whose poem “Death of Alaska” won first prize and 1000 Euros in the Gregory O’Donoghue International Poetry Competition, sponsored by the Munster Literature Centre in Ireland.  The Centre flew her to Cork, Ireland, where she read her winning entry February 16 at the Cork Spring Literature Festival 2011.  Her poem will be published in the Irish poetry journal, Southword.  Announcement of her winning  entry can be found at the festival blog site: http://www.munsterlit.ie/ .

.... to Linda Rohrbough. Linda  has an iPhone App of her workshop “Pitch Your Book” and her first novel The Prophetess I: At Risk, both coming out in Spring of 2011.

. . . to Suzy Barile, Wake Tech Community College instructor, whose essay titled "Richard Caswell Swain 1837-1872" is included in Shannon, Illinois: 150 Years -- 1860-2010, published for the Illinois town's sesquicentennial celebration. Swain was one of the first physicians in the then-frontier town of Shannon and Barile's great-great uncle. She also is the author of Undaunted Heart: The True Story of a Southern Belle & a Yankee General (Eno 2009).

......David Rigsbee’s new chapbook The Pilot House, winner of the 2009 Black River Chapbook Contest, has just been published by Black Lawrence Press.  More information is available at http://blacklawrence.wordpress.com/2011/01/29/a-sneak-peek-at-the-pilot-house/.

 

Hats Off! to Richard Krawiec, who has been asked to be on the Advisory Panel of Writing for Peace, a nonprofit organization dedicated to cultivating empathy through education and creative writing in order to develop a foundation of compassion on which to build a more peaceful world.

 

Hats Off! to Gwenyfar Rohler, whose novella is serialized this year in Encore Magazine. Titled "Contract Killer: Memoirs of a Reluctant Reaper," the latest installment is here.

 

Hats Off! to Malinda Dunlap Fillingim, whose poem "Biscuits" has been selected by the Winston-Salem poetry project, Poetry in Plain Sight, for its March 2013 edition.

 

Hats Off! to Glenda Barrett, whose poem "Final Wish" was accepted by Barely South. Also, her essay "The French Harp" was accepted for Bread 'n Molasses.

 

Hats Off! to Valerie Nieman, whose poem "Live With It," published in the ...and Love... anthology edited by Richard Krawiec, has been accepted for the new Virgina Quarterly Review Instapoetry project. She's "jazzed to think of this poem visualized."

 

Hats off! to Carol Cooley, whose essay was chosen for a second volume anthology, Unruly Catholic Women Writers, Creative Responses to Catholicism. The essay collection will be published by SUNY Press. The release date is slated for November 2013.

 

Hats Off! to Kathryn Etters Lovatt of Camden, SC, who has been named SC Arts Commission's Prose Writer for 2013. This $5,000 grant is awared every other year.

 

Hats Off! to new author in town, Irene Menendez. Macaroni Ponytail, her first illustrated children's book, appeared in "New and Notable" by Ben Steelman of the Wilmington Star-News, and her first booksigning was held at Two Sisters Bookery in Wilmington with standing room only.

 

 

Hats Off! to LC Fiore and Richard Krawiec, who finished first and second respectively in the Winston-Salem Writers Ten-Minute Play Contest. Fiore's "The Pit" and Krawiec's "Disabilities" will be given a staged reading and a discussion, moderated by Nathan Ross Freeman, in late April.

 

Hats Off! to Lavonne Adams of Wilmington, whose new poem “Disparity,” appears in the Winter 2012 issue of CALYX: A Journal of Art and Literature by Women.

. . . to Sandra Adams.  Two poems by Sandra Ervin Adams, "Shame," and "Family of Man," appear online in the February 2010, Black History Month edition of The Dead Mule.

...to Lisa Shearin. The next two books in Lisa's Raine Benares fantasy adventure series were sold to Anne Sowards at Ace Books by Kristin Nelson of the Nelson Literary Agency. 
...to Edwina Rooker. Her work "It Was All About 'The Circle'" won 2nd place in the nonfiction category of the 2007 Carteret Writers contest. Her poem "Billy Strayhorn" won Honorable Mention in the James Larkin Pearson Contest sponsored by The Poetry Council of North Carolina. Her World War II poem, "Lost Romance," appeared in the "Looking Back" anthology of Old Mountain Press.
..... to Susan Meyers. Her poetry book "Keep and Give Away" from USC Press has won the SIBA (Southern Independent Bookseller Alliance) award. 
...to Allan Jefferys, who is now writing a weekly column (Sundays) for the newspaper,The Pilot, which is published Sunday, Wednesday and Friday from Southern Pines, NC. Jefferys has written two novels and is a former New York, NY theatre critic. 
...to Katherine S. Crawford. Her historical novel Unto the Hills , won first place in the historical fiction category 2007 Paul Gillette Writing Contest, given by the Pikes Peak Writers' Conference. Crawford was also awarded a writers' residency in October 2007 to the Montana Artists Refuge. 
...to Brenda Kay Ledford. She received the 2007 Paul Green Multimedia Award from the North Carolina Society of Historians for her poetry chapbook, SHEW BIRD MOUNTAIN . It was published by Finishing Line Press. For more information, go to: www.brendakayledford.com 
...to Gerald Smith. His long essay, “The Pilgrim’s Procrastination,” in the current edition (Spring 2007) of The South Carolina Review. It appears in the section Republic of Letters and can be verified via this link http://www.clemson.edu/caah/cedp/SCR_CurrIss.htm.
...to Kathy Norcross Watts whose non-fiction short story "Goin’ Fishin’" was named the Linda Flowers Prize winner by the N.C. Humanities Council and was published in its October 2006 edition of NC Crossroads
...to Dody Williams Her story "Baba" will be published in the February issue of Read This Magazine. Read This Magazine is a literary magazine associated with the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. The editor, Claire Askew, wrote the following about Dody's story: "We were very impressed by "Baba"- it was not only skillfully written but very moving-beautifully done, a gread read. I hope you'll continue writing, and maybe submit to us again in the future!" 
...to Charles Blackburn, Jr., of Raleigh, NC. a Former Writers' Network board  president, received the 2008 Sam Ragan Fine Arts Award for Literature from St. Andrews Presbyterian College. His band, When Cousins Marry, performed as part of the this reading at the event. The group recently released their debut CD, Shotgun Wedding , featuring 13 original songs. Visit whencousinsmarry.com for related details. 
...to Susan Barry Blair whose children’s book Adventure on the High Sea! A Family’s Sailing Voyage Across the Atlantic was the featured review in the November issue of MySchoolRocks magazine, which is distributed to all elementary students in Charlotte-Mecklenburg county. She also presented her story at this year’s North Carolina School Library Media Association Convention in Winston-Salem October 5th.
...to Paula Offutt whose debut novel, Butch Girls Can Fix Anything, was released January 10th, 2007. The press release can be found on the publisher's website, Regal Crest Enterprises. http://regalcrest.biz/title_kit.php?bookID=144
...to Howard A. Goodman, whose short stories, "Husband" and "Déjà Vu" were selected for publication in Catfish Stew, the annual compilation of the South Carolina Writers’ Workshop.
...to Maureen Sherbondy Her Poem "Laundry Rant" won the 2007 Hart Crane Memorial Award from Kent State University.
...to Allison Adelle Hedge Coke. She has been appointed as the Distinguished and Endowed Paul and Clarice Reynolds Chair of English and Associate Professor of Poetry &Writing at the University of Nebraska, Kearney. 
...to Ann Barnhill. She currently has a poem online at Poetry Southeast and will have another in the spring, 2007 issue. Another poem has been accepted in the antholgy, Mourning Sickness, and an essay has been accepted for the anthology, A Quite Place. 
...to Chris Roerden, who won the internationally recognized Agatha Award for Best Nonfiction Book for Don't Murder Your Mystery It is also one of three finalists for the Macavity Award, given by Mystery Readers International, the largest organization of its kind in the world.
...to Alice Owens Johnson . She is a finalist in the Hidden River Arts 2006 Awards for her short story "Mrs. Peacock Did it in the Conservatory." 
...to Eleanora E. Tate, whose eleventh book, Celeste's Harlem Renaissance was released by Little Brown Books for Young Readers and has sparked a well-received "Celeste's Walking Tour" of downtown Raleigh. Her short story, "Root Beer Sit-In" was published by Scholastic Storyworks Magazine earlier this year and her chapter book Front Porch Stories at the One-Room School , was reprinted by Just Us Books, Inc. Publishers in February.
...to Nancy Williams. Her book The Agenda 21 Conspiracy won second place from the Southeastern Writers Association Conference.
... Zach Goodson had a short story, "Christmas Tree," published in Aries, Volume XXIII Winter 2007 - 2008, a publication of Southeastern Community College, Whiteville, NC.
...to the Hawkins family. The Anna Wooten-Hawkings Graduate Award has been established at UNC-Greensboro to support the work of outstanding graduate creative writing students.
 
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