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The Narratives: Evolution by Vince Guaglione

Create Space Independent Publishing Platform
$6.95, paperback / $0.99, e-book
ISBN: 978-1500260842
June, 2014
Personal growth, Personal transformation, Philosophy/Consciousness and Thought
Available from www.Amazon.com

The Narratives is a collection of short introspective essays written by an average guy in an effort to better understand himself, his life, and his relationship with the world around him while traveling the road of self-discovery. This series can best be described as the author's unique brand of journaling, encompassing both self-reflective entries, and an expression of thought and opinion surrounding social issues of the present day.

The Narratives: Evolution documents a new chapter in the author's personal growth, following a period of instability, grief, and mourning brought on by the death of a loved one. Each short journal-style essay presented in this work touches on the author's search for substance, depth, and purpose, and is written with full transparency, providing the reader with a unique window into the author's soul.

The Narratives: Evolution, is the fourth volume in The Narratives series.

Vince Guaglione is a guy who asks lots of questions, not only of himself but of his society and the world around him. Although he claims he's found no real answers, that hasn't stopped him in his quest to gain perspective on a little something we call life. When he's not at his real job, you can find him sucking down venti-sized coffees at a brisk pace his local Starbucks, thinking up new writing projects, or pondering his mystery questions of life. Originally from Philadelphia PA, Vince now resides in Raleigh NC.

While working on working his Narratives series, Vince pulled together some ideas from his youth and crafted two stories, classified in the short fictional realm, titled "Chasing Angels" and "Eva."

Russ HatlerNORTH CAROLINA—Welcome to the new website of the North Carolina Writers’ Network! Things are grouped a little differently now than they were on our old site, so here are a few tips to help you get oriented:

At the top of the page is a menu bar. If you’re looking for any information about the Network, including contact info, it’s under “About Us.”

If you’re looking for information about conferences, competitions, or hunting for our events calendar, that’s under “Programs and Services.”

Hats Off!, Book Buzz, and other sections that showcase our members are under “Our Members.”

And if you’re a member of NCWN, you can sign in and then access the “Members Only” section, which includes “Opportunities” and contacts for “Literary Agents and Editors.” But you must be a current member, and you must sign in, to access this section.

Below the menu bar are graphics which link to our White Cross School Blog, the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame, and one of our current contests, the 2014 Doris Betts Fiction Prize.

A bit farther down the right-hand side of the page is a menu of links. In redesigning our site, we decided there are other organizations who keep much better databases of things like funding opportunities, literary magazines, and publishers than we ever could. So most of these menu items link to trustworthy, outside sites. Enjoy!

Another major change is that, in order to submit your news to Hats Off! or Book Buzz, or submit an event for an inclusion in our events calendar, there’s no longer any need to e-mail us. Simply click on the link(s) provided, fill out the appropriate form, and we’ll take care of the rest.

Can’t find something? See a typo? Something not working right? E-mail Charles Fiore, Communications Director, at Charles@ncwriters.org.

 

NORTH CAROLINA—The 2014 Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition is now open for submissions. This contest awards the first-place winner $200 and publication in storySouth.

The 2014 Randall Jarrell Competition is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network. Submissions should be one poem only (40-line limit). The contest deadline is March 1.

The final judge is Jillian Weise, author of The Book of Goodbyes (BOA Editions, 2013), which received the 2013 James Laughlin Award from the Academy of American Poets, which recognizes a superior second book of poetry by an American poet. Her debut poetry collection, The Amputee’s Guide to Sex, was published by Soft Skull Press in 2007. Weise is also the author of the novel The Colony (Counterpoint/Soft Skull Press, 2010). Her other honors include a Fulbright Fellowship and the 2013 Isabella Gardner Poetry Award from BOA Editions. She teaches at Clemson University and lives in Greenville, South Carolina.

storySouth is an online literary journal dedicated to showcasing the best poetry (and fiction and creative nonfiction) that writers from the "new south" have to offer. Facilitated by the Graduate Program in Creative Writing at UNCG, storySouth aims to prove that "the internet is not just a medium of flash and style; that excellent writing can attract attention without programming gimmicks and hard-to-read fonts." storySouth believes the American South today is a "mix of traditional and new, regional and international." Published poets include Cathy Smith Bowers, Al Maginnes, Dannye Romine Powell, and Elizabeth Swann.

This competition honors the work and legacy of the poet and critic Randall Jarrell, who taught at what is now the University of North Carolina at Greensboro for nearly eighteen years. The competition is administered by Terry L. Kennedy and the Graduate Program in Creative Writing at UNCG.

Alan Michael Parker won the 2013 Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition for his poem, "The Ladder." Joseph Mills, Katherine Soniat, and Ross White received honorable mentions.

Here are the eligibility requirements and guidelines:

  • The competition is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network.
  • Submissions should be one poem only (40-line limit).
  • Poem must be typed (single-spaced) and stapled in the left-hand corner.
  • Author's name should not appear on the poem. Instead, include a separate cover sheet with author's name, address, e-mail address, phone number, and poem title.
  • Poem will not be returned. Include a self-addressed stamped envelope for a list of winner and finalists. The winner and finalists will be announced in May.
  • An entry fee must accompany the poem. Multiple submissions are accepted, one poem per entry fee: $10 for NCWN members, $15 for nonmembers.
  • You may pay member entry fee if you join the NCWN with your submission. Checks should be made payable to the North Carolina Writers’ Network.
  • Send submissions to:

Terry L. Kennedy
MFA Writing Program
3302 MHRA Building
UNC Greensboro
Greensboro, NC 27402-6170

NORTH CAROLINA—If you are a writer of creative nonfiction, who has been on the fence about sending in an entry to the Rose Post Creative Nonfiction Competition, then now would be a good time to hop down and submit.

Thanks to a generous donation from Rose Post’s family, the prize amounts that will be awarded for the top three entries in this contest have been increased: $200 for 3rd Place; $300 for 2nd Place; and $1,000 for 1st Place.

The winning entry will still be considered for publication by Southern Cultures magazine, as well.

The Rose Post Creative Nonfiction Competition encourages the creation of lasting nonfiction that is outside the realm of conventional journalism and has relevance to North Carolinians. Subjects may include traditional categories such as reviews, travel articles, profiles or interviews, place/history pieces, or culture criticism.

The postmark deadline for entries into the 2014 contest is Friday, January 17. Online submissions must be received before midnight on that date.

This year’s final judge is Hannah Dela Cruz Abrams, whose novella The Man Who Danced with Dolls won a 2013 Whiting Writers’ Awards of $50,000, one of the richest prizes in American literature. She holds an MFA (’07) from the University of North Carolina Wilmington, where she now teaches in the English Department. She is the recipient of a North Carolina Arts Council Fellowship, a Rona Jaffe Writer’s Award, a Hartshook Fellowship, and a Byington Award. Born on Guam, Abrams is currently at work on her memoir, The Following Sea, about growing up on a cutter that made port throughout the South Pacific.

Rose Post worked for the Salisbury Post for fifty-six years as a reporter, feature writer, and columnist. She won numerous state and national awards for her writing and earned the N.C. Press Women's top annual award four times. She received the O. Henry Award from the Associated Press three times, the Pete Ivey Award, and the School Bell Award for educational coverage. Nationally, she won the 1989 Ernie Pyle Award, the Scripps Howard Foundation National Journalism Award for human-interest writing, and the 1994 National Society of Newspaper Columnists' Award.

Here are the complete guidelines:

  • The competition is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network.
  • The postmark deadline is January 17.
  • The entry fee is $10 for NCWN members, $12 for nonmembers.
  • Entries can be submitted in one of two ways:
    1. Send two printed copies through the U.S. Postal Service (see guidelines and address below), along with a check for the appropriate fee, made payable to the North Carolina Writers' Network.
    2. Submit an electronic copy online at http://ncwriters.submittable.com, and pay by VISA or MasterCard.
  • Each entry must be an original and previously unpublished manuscript of no more than 2,000 words, typed in a 12-point standard font (i.e., Times New Roman) and double-spaced.
  • Author's name should not appear on manuscript. Instead, include a separate cover sheet with name, address, phone number, e-mail address, word count, and manuscript title. If submitting electronically, page 1 should be your cover sheet.
  • An entry fee must accompany the manuscript. Multiple submissions are accepted, one manuscript per entry fee: $10 for NCWN members, $12 for nonmembers.
  • You may pay the member entry fee if you join the NCWN with your submission. Checks should be made payable to the North Carolina Writers’ Network.
  • Entries will not be returned. Winners will be announced in March.
  • Send submission to:
North Carolina Writers' Network
ATTN: Rose Post
PO Box 21591
Winston-Salem, NC 27120

 

 NORTH CAROLINA—The 2014 Doris Betts Fiction Prize is now open for submissions. The Doris Betts Fiction Prize awards the first-place winner $250 and publication in the North Carolina Literary Review. Finalists will also be considered for publication in the NCLR.

For over twenty years, East Carolina University and the North Carolina Literary & Historical Association have published the North Carolina Literary Review, a journal devoted to showcasing the Tar Heel State’s literary excellence. Described by one critic as “everything you ever wanted out of a literary publication but never dared to demand,” the NCLR has won numerous awards and citations.

The Doris Betts Fiction Prize is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network. North Carolina Literary Review subscribers with North Carolina connections (lives or has lived in NC) are also eligible.

The final judge is NCLR fiction editor Liza Wieland (left). She the author of seven books and three collections of short fiction. She has won two Pushcart Prizes, the Michigan Literary Fiction Prize, a Bridport Prize in the UK, and fellowships from The National Endowment for the Arts, The North Carolina Arts Council, and the Christopher Isherwood Foundation. She has recently been awarded a second fellowship from the North Carolina Arts Council.

Claudette Cohen of Carolina Beach won the 2013 Doris Betts Fiction Prize for her story, “The Mayor of Biscoe.”

Doris Betts was the author of three short story collections and six novels. She won three Sir Walter Raleigh awards, the Southern Book Award, the North Carolina Award for Literature, the John Dos Passos Prize, and the American Academy of Arts and Letters Medal for the short story, among others. Beloved by her students, she was named the University of North Carolina Alumni Distinguished Professor of English in 1980.

Here are the guidelines for the 2014 Doris Betts Fiction Prize:

Doris Betts Fiction Prize
Submission Deadline: February 15 (annual)

The Doris Betts Fiction Prize awards the first-prize winner $250 and publication in the North Carolina Literary Review. Finalists will also be considered for publication in the NCLR.

Eligibility and Guidelines

  • The competition is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network. North Carolina Literary Review subscribers with North Carolina connections (lives or has lived in NC) are also eligible.
  • The competition is for previously unpublished short stories up to 6,000 words. One entry per writer. No novel excerpts. Stories do NOT have to relate to NCLR’s annual special feature topic.
  • Submit previously unpublished stories online at https://nclr.submittable.com/submit. Submittable will collect your entry fee via credit card ($10 NCWN members or NCLR subscribers / $20 for non-members/non-subscribers).
  • To pay submission fees by check or money order, make payable to the North Carolina Writers Network and mail to: Ed Southern, PO Box 21591, Winston-Salem, NC 27120- 1591
  • Documents must be Microsoft Word or .rtf files. The author’s name should not appear in the story file. Title the file with the story’s title to connect the story with your name. If you have any problems submitting electronically, email NCLR's Submission Manager.

 

The winner and finalists will be announced in April. The winning story and select finalists will be published in the next year’s issue of the North Carolina Literary Review.

Questions may be directed to Margaret Bauer, Editor of the North Carolina Literary Review, at BauerM@ecu.edu.

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

 

The North Carolina Writers’ Network is now accepting submissions for its annual Doris Betts Fiction Prize, administered by the North Carolina Literary Review.

The Doris Betts Fiction Prize awards $250 and publication in the NCLR to the author of the winning short story. Up to ten finalists will also be considered for publication. The contest is open to writers with North Carolina connections (who live or have lived in NC), members of the North Carolina Writers’ Network, or subscribers to the NCLR.

Published since 1992 by East Carolina University and the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association, the North Carolina Literary Review has won numerous awards and citations. The Doris Betts Fiction Prize honors beloved writer and teacher Doris Betts (1932-2012), who in the course of her long career won three Sir Walter Raleigh awards, the Southern Book Award, the North Carolina Award for Literature, the John Dos Passos Prize, and the American Academy of Arts and Letters Medal for the short story, among other recognitions. Her Souls Raised from the Dead was on the New York Times’ list of top twenty best books in 1994. Among her many other acclaimed works are The Astronomer and Other Stories, Beasts of the Southern Wild and Other Stories, and The Scarlet Thread. She was inducted into the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame in 2004.

Entries to the 2013 contest can be submitted through the NCLR’s online submission process at www.nclr.ecu.edu/submissions/submit-online.html. Full submission guidelines are as follows:

Postmark deadline: February 15 (annual)
Submissions accepted: January 1 – February 15

The Doris Betts Fiction Prize awards the first-prize winner $250 and publication in the North Carolina Literary Review. Finalists will also be considered for publication in NCLR.

 

Eligibility and Guidelines

  • The competition is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network. North Carolina Literary Review subscribers with North Carolina connections (lives or has lived in NC) are also eligible.
  • The competition is for previously unpublished short stories up to 6,000 words. One entry per writer. No novel excerpts. Stories do NOT have to relate to NCLR’s annual special feature topic.
  • Submit previously unpublished stories online at https://nclr.submittable.com/submit. Submittable will collect your entry fee via credit card ($10 NCWN members or NCLR subscribers / $20 for non-members/non-subscribers).
  • To pay submission fees by check or money order, make payable to the North Carolina Writers Network and mail to: Ed Southern, PO Box 21591, Winston-Salem, NC 27120- 1591
  • Documents must be Microsoft Word or .rtf files. The author’s name should not appear in the story file. Title the file with the story’s title to connect the story with your name. If you have any problems submitting electronically, email NCLR's Submission Manager.

 

The winner and finalists will be announced in April. The winning story and select finalists will be published in the next year’s issue of the North Carolina Literary Review.

Questions may be directed to Gabrielle Brant Freeman, Submission Manager of the North Carolina Literary Review, at NCLRSubmissions@ecu.edu.

Leah Hampton of Waynesville, NC, won the 2012 Doris Betts Fiction Prize for her story, "The Saint." Gregg Cusick, Ronald Jackson, and Kathryn Lovatt received Honorable Mentions.

The non-profit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

The Secret of Isobel Key

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Secret of Isobel Key by Jen McConnel

Bloomsbury Spark
$4.99, e-book
ISBN: 9781619634640
December, 2013
Fiction, YA
Available from the publisher or www.Amazon.com

Lou is in the middle of a quarter-life crisis. Fresh out of college, she’s unemployed and unsure of herself. But when she gets the chance to escape to Scotland with her best friend, it could be the answer to her quest for self-discovery. The trip is not at all what she expected, especially when her tour guide turns out to be the dreamy historian Brian, and together they embark on a hunt for information about Isobel Key, a woman accused of witchcraft in the seventeenth century.

They set out to learn the truth of the condemned witch, but Lou isn’t prepared for the knowledge that awaits her. She must face her own demons if she has any hope of righting the wrongs of the past.

Flashing between the seventeenth century and modern day Scotland, The Secret of Isobel Key is a mystery that will please readers of all ages.

Jen McConnel first began writing poetry as a child. A Michigander by birth, she now lives and writes in the beautiful state of North Carolina. When she isn't crafting worlds of fiction, she teaches college writing composition and yoga. Once upon a time, she was a middle school teacher, a librarian, and a bookseller, but those are stories for another time.

Visit http://www.jenmcconnel.com to learn more.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eye of the Beholder by Scott Owens

Main Street Rag
$15, paperback
ISBN: 978-1-59948-441-9
January, 2014
Poetry
Available from the publisher

"The poetry of Scott Owens traces the contours of loss and hope, possibility and renewal. A heartfelt quality or soulfulness, best defined as the determination to speak honestly and courageously of important personal matters, pervades this book and gives it emotional urgency page after page. Drawn to what he calls 'a poetics of excess,' Owens nevertheless embodies Cocteau’s definition of tact—'knowing how far to go in going too far'—while striking a similar balance between long poems and haiku-like or koan-like short ones, which provide a kind of seasoning for the feast of the whole. Especially notable at the book’s center is a love poem Neruda would have been happy to write, the laser-intense 'You in the Tomb of My Eyes,' a paean to the night that anchors the surrounding testimonies to a life lived passionately and thoughtfully. Owens knows poetry is a serious business; while various other poets these days might seem caught up in gamesmanship, this poet plays for keeps."
—Philip Dacey, Editor of Strong Measures

Not love poems exactly, but certainly poems about love.

Originally from Greenwood, SC, Scott Owens holds degrees from Ohio University, UNC Charlotte, and UNC Greensboro. He currently lives in Hickory, NC, where he teaches at Catawba Valley Community College, edits Wild Goose Poetry Review and 234, writes for the Outlook Newspaper, and serves as vice-president of the NC Poetry Society. Eye of the Beholder is his 11th book of poetry. His work has received awards from the Academy of American Poets, the Pushcart Prize Anthology, the Next Generation/Indie Lit Awards, the NC Writers Network, the NC Poetry Society, and the Poetry Society of SC. His website is www.scottowenspoet.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Starting Over by Elizabeth Spencer

Liverlight
$24.95, hardcover
ISBN: 978-0871406811
January, 2014
Fiction
Available from your local bookstore or www.Amazon.com

One of the masters of American short fiction—author of The Light in the Piazza—returns with a new collection of stories.

On the release of her first novel in 1948, Elizabeth Spencer was immediately championed by Robert Penn Warren and Eudora Welty, setting off a remarkable career as one of the great literary voices of the American South. Her career, now spanning seven decades, continues here with nine new stories. In Starting Over, Spencer returns to the deep emotional fault lines and unseen fractures that lie just beneath the veneer of happy family life. In “Sightings,” a troubled daughter suddenly returns to the home of the father she accidently blinded during her parents’ bitter separation; in “Blackie,” the reappearance of a son from a divorcee’s first marriage triggers a harrowing confrontation with her new family; while in “The Wedding Visitor,” a cousin travels home only to find himself entwined in the events leading up to a family wedding. In these nine stories, Spencer excels at revealing the flawed fabric of human relations.

Malcolm Jones called one of the stories in the book, "On the Hill," one of the "best stories I’ve ever read" in the New York Times Sunday Book Review.

Elizabeth Spencer is regarded as one of America’s most outstanding fiction writers. Spencer was born in Carrollton, Mississippi, in 1921 to a storytelling and book-loving family in a community steeped in the oral traditions of the South, and subsequently set many of her works in the hill country and deltas of Mississippi and Louisiana. The author of nine novels, many fine short stories, and the famous novella The Light in the Piazza, Spencer has received the Award of Merit Medal for the Short Story from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, of which she is a member. She has also been awarded the Cleanth Brooks Medal by the Fellowship of Southern Writers, and the North Carolina Award for Literature. Many of her stories and short fiction have recently been collected, along with six new stories, in The Southern Woman (2001), published to wide critical acclaim. She is a member of the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame.

 

North Carolina Literary ReviewThe North Carolina Writers' Network is now accepting submissions for three annual competitions. These contests offer members and non-members the chance to put their work in front of industry professionals around the state--fellow authors, publishers, and editors--and gain recognition that will further their career. But the postmark deadlines are fast approaching, so the time to submit is now.

January 17 marks the deadline for the Rose Post Creative Nonfiction Competition, which encourages the creation of lasting nonfiction work that is outside the realm of conventional journalism and has relevance to North Carolinians. Subjects may include traditional categories such as reviews, travel articles, profiles or interviews, place/history pieces, or culture criticism. The first-, second-, and third-place winners will receive $300, $200, and $100 respectively. The winning entry will be considered for publication by Southern Cultures magazine. Award-winning author Anne Clinard Barnhill will be the final judge.

January 30 is the deadline for the Thomas Wolfe Fiction Prize honoring internationally celebrated North Carolina novelist Thomas Wolfe. The winner receives $1,000 and possible publication in The Thomas Wolfe Review. The competition is open to all writers regardless of geographical location or prior publication. Acclaimed author Josephine Humphreys will serve as the final judge.

Josephine HumphreysFinally, the Network is accepting submissions for the Doris Betts Fiction Prize. This competition honors acclaimed author and North Carolina native Doris Betts. The prize awards the first-place winner $250 and publication in the North Carolina Literary Review. Finalists will also be considered for publication in NCLR. The postmark deadline is February 15.

The distinguished judges are a large part of what makes these competitions so prestigious. Anne Clinard Barnhill, who will judge the Rose Post Creative Nonfiction Competition, has signed a two-book deal with St. Martin's Press. Her debut novel, At the Mercy of the Queen, was published in January, 2012. Her poetry chapbook, Coal, Baby, will also appear in early 2012 from Finishing Line Press. She is the author of two books: What You Long For (Main Street Rag, 2009—short-story collection) and At Home in the Land of Oz: Autism, My Sister, and Me (Jessica Kingsley, 2007—memoir). Her articles and short stories have appeared in a variety of newspapers, literary anthologies, and magazines. Her work has won various awards and grants.

Anne Clinard BarnhillJosephine Humphreys, final judge of the Thomas Wolfe Fiction Prize, is a recipient of an Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. She is the author of Dreams of Sleep (winner of the 1985 Ernest Hemingway Award for first fiction), Rich in Love, The Fireman's Fair, and Nowhere Else on Earth.

The North Carolina Literary Review, which will choose the winner and finalists for the Doris Betts Fiction Prize, is entering its twentieth year of publication and has been called "the state's literary journal of record."

For more information on all three contests, including submission guidelines. visit www.ncwriters.org.

 

North Carolina Literary ReviewNORTH CAROLINA--The North Carolina Writers' Network is still accepting submissions for its 2012 Doris Betts Fiction Prize. This competition honors acclaimed author and North Carolina native Doris Betts, three-time winner of the Sir Walter Raleigh Award and recipient of the North Carolina Award for Literature, among many other honors.

The Doris Betts Fiction Prize awards the first-prize winner $250 and publication in the North Carolina Literary Review. Finalists will also be considered for publication in NCLR.

Thomas Wolf of Chapel Hill won the 2011 Doris Betts Fiction Prize for his story "Boundaries." This was Mr. Wolf's second award, having also won in 2007 for his story, "Distance." "Boundaries" will be published in the 2012 issue of NCLR, along with the second-place story, "The Honey Wagon," by Joseph Cavano.

The 2011 competition drew nearly 100 entries. The Doris Betts Fiction Prize is sponsored by the Network and managed by the editorial staff of the North Carolina Literary Review. Published since 1992 by East Carolina University and the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association, NCLR has won numerous awards and citations.

The Doris Betts Fiction Prize
Postmark deadline: February 15 (annual)
Submissions accepted: January 1 – February 15

Eligibility and Guidelines:

 

  • The competition is open to any writer who is a legal resident of NC or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network. NCLR subscribers with NC connections (who live or have lived in NC) are also eligible.
  • The competition is for unpublished short stories up to 6,000 words. One entry per writer. No novel excerpts. No simultaneous submissions.
  • Submit story electronically via the NCLR’s online submission process. For electronic submission instructions and to start the online submission process, go to: www.nclr.ecu.edu/submissions/submit-online.html.
  • Author's name should not appear on the manuscript. Author will register with the NCLR’s online submission system, which will collect contact information and connect it to the author's submission.
  • An entry fee must be mailed to the NCLR office (address below) by the postmark deadline (February 15).
  • You may pay the Network member/ NCLR subscriber entry fee if you join the NCWN or subscribe to the NCLR with your submission: $10 (NCWN members, NCLR subscribers) or $20 (nonmembers/ nonsubscribers--must be a NC resident).
  • Checks should be made payable to the North Carolina Writers’ Network. (Separate checks should be made payable to the North Carolina Literary Review only if purchasing a subscription to the NCLR.)
  • Mail checks or money orders to:

North Carolina Literary Review
ECU Mailstop 555 English
Greenville, NC 27858-4353

  • The winner and finalists will be announced in May.
  • Questions may be directed to the NCLR at NCLRSubmissions@ecu.edu

 

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

Poet and editor Dan Albergotti, the winner of the 2005 Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition, will judge this year’s Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition.

Submissions for this year’s Jarrell contest are now open, until the March 1 postmark deadline.

A graduate of the MFA program at UNC Greensboro and former poetry editor of The Greensboro Review, Albergotti currently teaches creative writing and literature courses and edits the online journal Waccamaw (www.waccamawjournal.com) at Coastal Carolina University in Conway, South Carolina.  He is the author of The Boatloads (BOA Editions, 2008), selected by Edward Hirsch as the winner of the 2007 A. Poulin, Jr. Poetry Prize.  His poems have appeared in The Cincinnati Review, Shenandoah, The Southern Review, The Virginia Quarterly Review, and Pushcart Prize XXXIII: Best of the Small Presses.

The Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition honors the work and legacy of the poet and critic Randall Jarrell, who taught at what is now the University of North Carolina at Greensboro for nearly eighteen years.

The contest accepts one-poem submissions.  The winner receives $200, publication in The Crucible literary journal, and an invitation to read his or her poetry at UNC Greensboro’s Founders Day activities.

The competition is administered by Terry L. Kennedy and the graduate program in creative writing at UNCG, and is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network.  Questions may be directed to Kennedy at tlkenned@uncg.edu.  Full guidelines are below.

Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition
Postmark deadline: March 1 (annual)

Eligibility and Guidelines

  • The competition is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina or a member of the NC Writers’ Network.
  • Submissions should be one poem only (40-line limit).
  • Poem must be typed (single-spaced) and stapled in the left-hand corner.
  • Names should not appear on the poem but on a separate cover sheet along with address, phone number, and poem title.
  • Poem will not be returned. Include a self-addressed stamped envelope for a list of winners.
  • An entry fee must accompany the poem. Multiple submissions are accepted, one poem per entry fee: $10 for NCWN members, $15 for nonmembers. You may pay member entry fee if you join the NCWN with your submission. Checks should be made payable to the North Carolina Writers’ Network.

The winner will be announced in May.

Send submissions, indicating name of competition, to:
Terry Kennedy
MFA Writing Program
3302 MHRA Building
UNC Greensboro
Greensboro, NC 27402-6170

Checks should be made payableto the North Carolina Writers’ Network.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenge on the Fly by Michael Cavender

CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
$14.99, paperback / $8.95, e-book
ISBN: 978-1484915103
November, 2013
Fiction
Available from your local bookstore or www.Amazon.com

"Revenge on the Fly is a beautiful meditation on the ties that bind us to family and place. Michael Cavender is a gifted writer, an exciting new voice in North Carolina literature."
—Ron Rash, New York Times best-selling author of Serena and The Cove

"Cavender's potent homage to ancient old growth forests and the power of nature juxtaposes nicely against the very real threat of development, but there's more at work with the complex Phelps siblings. Revenge on the Fly is an engrossing mix of atmosphere and strongly drawn characters, with Ben Phelps at its center unraveling the darkness that lies at the heart of his family's secrets. Compelling and well-written, Cavender's writing draws readers into his tale of evil control, redemption, and the power of hope."
—Marni Graff, author, The Blue Virgin , The Green Remains

Dissolute outdoor writer Ben Phelps grasps the chance to avenge a life-ruining lie despite the human costs to a friend who holds the means for revenge, and to the woman whose love may reward his boldness.

Decades ago, Watt Phelps told his younger brother Ben a lie that drove him into dark despair and disinheritance from a family fortune. When a pathway opens for overdue vengeance, retribution demands Ben’s willingness to send his brother to prison, as well as the new friend who secretes the crime that’s the key to justice. The pathway also opens Ben’s heart to prove to a suspicious woman he’s worthy of her trust and love. These converging challenges might save Ben’s unknown legacy, the last old-growth forest in the Blue Ridge Mountains, from Watt’s destruction, and restore a life tainted by his brother’s duplicity. In Revenge on the Fly, Ben learns that his bitter perceptions of success and failure are only part of his life-long delusions, and that loving completely means risking everything.

Michael Cavender is a North Carolina writer who directed the Highlands-Cashiers Land Trust, North Carolina’s oldest land conservation trust. He was also a newspaper reporter and fly-fishing guide on the rivers and streams of the southern Blue Ridge Mountains. A graduate of The University of Tennessee, he lives near Chapel Hill, North Carolina, where he is working on his next novel, a crime thriller.

The North Carolina Writers’ Network is now accepting submissions for its annual Doris Betts Fiction Prize, administered by the North Carolina Literary Review.

The Doris Betts Fiction Prize awards $250 and publication in the NCLR to the author of the winning short story, up to 6,000 words.  The contest is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina, a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network, or a subscriber to the NCLR.

Robert Wallace of Durham won the 2010 Betts prize for his story “As Breaks the Wave Upon the Sea.”

Entries to the 2011 contest can be submitted through the NCLR’s online submission process at www.nclr.ecu.edu/submissions/submit-online.html.  Full submission guidelines, including entry fees, are listed below.

Doris Betts Fiction Prize
Postmark Deadline: February 15 (annual)
Submissions Accepted from January 1 – February 15

The Doris Betts Fiction Prize awards the first-prize winner $250 and publication in the North Carolina Literary Review. Finalists will also be considered for publication in the NCLR.

Eligibility and Guidelines

  • The competition is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network. North Carolina Literary Review subscribers with North Carolina connections (lives or has lived in NC) are also eligible.
  • The competition is for short stories up to 6,000 words. One entry per writer. No novel excerpts.
  • Submit story electronically via the NCLR’s online submission process. For electronic submission instructions and to start the online submission process, go to: www.nclr.ecu.edu/submissions/submit-online.html.
  • Names should not appear in the Word file of the story; authors will register with the NCLR’s online submission system, which will collect contact information and connect it to story submission.
  • An entry fee must be mailed to the NCLR office (address below) by the postmark deadline (February 15 each year).
  • You may pay the Network member/NCLR subscriber entry fee if you join NCWN or subscribe to the NCLR with your submission:

$10/NCWN members and/or NCLR subscribers
$20/nonmembers (must be a North Carolina resident)

  • Checks for submission fee and/or Network membership should be made PAYABLE TO the North Carolina Writers’ Network (separate checks payable to the NCLR only if purchasing a subscription).
  • Mail checks or money orders to:

North Carolina Literary Review
ECU Mailstop 555 English
Greenville, NC 27858-4353

The winner and finalists will be announced in May. Winning story and select finalists will be published in the next year’s issue of the North Carolina Literary Review.

Questions may be directed to the North Carolina Literary Review, at NCLRSubmissions@ecu.edu.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Drop Dead Gorgeous: L.A. Vamps Book One by Suki McMinn

Temptress Press
$3.99, e-book
ASIN: B00HORWK28
January, 2014
Fiction
Available from www.Amazon.com

Derek Randall is an L.A. supermodel who’s made a vampire, but longs to return to the life he loved. With the help of his true love, Clara, an unemployed modeling agent who’s just getting used to being bitten, as well as his nest of hunky “brothers,” he struggles to learn what it is to be a vampire. He and Clara launch his new modeling career, and Derek begins a dangerous game, trying to keep his evil maker, Madeline, at bay. Derek will sacrifice everything to save Clara—his career, his vampire brothers, and even his very existence. Love gives Derek more strength than dark magic ever could.

Suki McMinn grew up in Asheville, North Carolina, has an English Literature degree from the University of Tennessee, and spent most of her adult life in the entertainment industry in Los Angeles. She now lives in Tryon, in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina with her husband and rescued dogs. She’s also a photographer, potter, and fiber artist.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Curing Time by Tim Swink

Pegasus Books
$16.95, paperback
ISBN: 978-0-9910993-1-3
December, 2013
Fiction
Available at your local bookstore or www.Amazon.com

Curing Time is tobacco's season of harvest, a time of transformation when the leaf is made golden by subjection to fire and heat. Tobacco farmer Hume Rankin endures his own curing time in the summer of 1959. When the rains won't come and the crops wilt in the field, he solicits the magic of a blind, old black woman. She warns about the dangers of calling on the middle world and tells him once those spirits are unleashed, it is they who decide when and how the spell unfolds. Hume dismisses her warning, to his peril. When his life-long nemesis, whose always had his eye on Hume's land as well as his wife, is found dead, all eyes are on Hume. He faces the all-too real possibility of losing his land, his family and even his life. Sitting in a jail cell, uncertain of his own innocence, he finds himself lost and a long way from home. Recalling the old woman's warning, he is haunted by the possibility that he may have played a part in his own demise.

Tim Swink studied Legal Administration at Greensboro College and has worked in the legal profession for over twenty years. He is winding down his "day job" and has come home to his first love, writing. Prior to his legal career, he was the Managing Editor of a weekly newspaper in Moore County. He has worked for USA Today, the Greensboro News and Record, Tarheel Magazine, and is currently a contributing writer for O.Henry Magazine. A sequel to Curing Time is in the works, as well as a third book entitled, Madd Inlet which takes place at Sunset Beach, North Carolina, in 1968-1969, during the turbulent crux of the Vietnam war. Tim is the grandson of a North Carolina tobacco farmer and has peeled the caked tobacco juice from his hands, as well. Tim and his wife, Renee, reside in Greensboro.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eulogy for an Imperfect Man: Poems by Maureen A. Sherbondy

Brick Road Poetry Press
15.95, paperback
ISBN: 978-0-983535304-3-5
March, 2013
Poetry
Available from the publisher (Pre-order and shipping is free)

"These are poems as restless as the ghosts that pass from page to page, and they'll haunt you long after you leave the last line. Sherbondy's stark images are as true as her unflinching examination of our struggle to put the dead to rest and let our pasts be past."
—Barbara Presnell, Piece Work

Maureen Sherbondy’s books are After the Fairy Tale, Praying at Coffee Shops, The Slow Vanishing, Weary Blues, and Scar Girl. She recently won the Spring Garden Press Robert Watson Poetry Award for The Year of Dead Fathers. The book will be published this summer. Her full-length collection, Eulogy for an Imperfect Man, is forthcoming from Brick Road Poetry Press. Her fiction has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize. She received an MFA from Queens University of Charlotte. Maureen lives in Raleigh with her three sons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ten Poems and Eleven Paintings, Christmas 2009 by Laurence Holden

Laurence Holden
$4.99, iPad
December, 2012
Poetry
Available on iTunes

Ten Poems and Eleven Paintings, Christmas 2009 is a book where vision and poetry gather, where sound and sight converse. These paintings and poems share something important—a concentrated form of paying attention—paying attention to what is! And what is, is both moving and still, both seen and unseen, heard and unheard. The paintings are still, yet move in our minds, thoughts, and feelings. The poems move in our minds, our thoughts, our feelings, and yet they form pooling echoes of the still and eternal present. Paintings and poems—two sides of one coin.

This electronic version includes two additional videos and is developed and adapted by Louis Leon from a handmade limited edition book the artist created and gave for a Christmas gift to friends and family in 2009.

Laurence Holden lives along Warwoman Creek in the Southern Appalachian Mountains of the US, drawing his paintings and poems from his connection to the land here. His work in paint and word are just two natural dialects for the same thing—bearing witness to the Creation. His work articulates a belief that if we can restore our understanding of the land and our relationship to it, we might save ourselves too in these perilous times. 

Laurence's poems have appeared in several issues of the Chrysalis Reader, as well as in Written River, Appalachian Heritage, and The Reach of Song: The Poetry Anthology of the Georgia Poetry Society, 2011 and 2010, His work received an award of excellence from the Georgia Poetry Society in 2010 and an honorable mention from the Byron Herbert Reece Society in 2011. His paintings have appeared in over twenty solo exhibits, and are represented in over 200 public, private, and corporate collections.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Near Waking by Dede Wilson

Finishing Line Press
$12.00, paperback
March, 2013
Poetry
Available from the publisher

"Dede Wilson's Near Waking tantalizes the reader with its energetic poems that flirt with irony and age, gracefully tip-toeing around the edges of grief with a playfulness of forms that give pleasure and insight.... This is a downright exquisite gathering of poems."
—Kathryn Stripling Byer, former N.C. Poet Laureate and recent inductee, N.C. Literary Hall of Fame

"You might feel a shiver...the chill of recognition, of glimpsing your daylight self and its shadow reflected in the same mirror, caught in those gauzy moments between dream and waking."
—Rebecca McClanahan, author of Deep Light: New and Selected Poems and The Riddle Song and Other Rememberings.

Dede Wilson is the author of four previous books of poems: Eliza: The New Orleans Years, Glass, Sea of Small Fears, and One Nightstand, a collection of light verse in forms followed by a primer to poetic form. Four poems from Eliza: The New Orleans Years were published in Nimrod as finalists for the Pablo Neruda Prize, and the poem "Yellow Fever," published as "Hydra," was nominated for a Pushcart. Her poems have appeared in Carolina Quarterly, Spoon River Poetry Review, Poet Lore, New Orleans Poetry Review, Poem, Cream City Review, Tar River Poetry, Iodine Poetry Journal, Flyway, Southern Poetry Review, Cave Wall, South Carolina Poetry Review, Asheville Poetry Review, The Lyric, Light, and many other journals. She has published short stories, essays, and a family memoir, Fourth Child, Second Daughter. Dede is a former travel editor of the Dallas Times-Herald. A native of Louisiana, she has lived in Charlotte, North Carolina, since 1967. She and her husband have two grown sons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ink in the Wheels: Stories to Make Love Roll by S. Barton and Megan M. Cutter

Cutter’s Edge Consulting, LLC
$15.97, paperback
ISBN: 978-1-4675-4459-7
February 15, 2013
Memoir
Available from the publisher and www.Amazon.com

A groundbreaking memoir about love, disability and perseverance, Ink in the Wheels: Stories to Make Love Roll is the unlikely story of Barton and Megan Cutter, and their journey to build a successful marriage despite others expectations. Barton Cutter, who has Cerebral Palsy never expected to fall in love, never mind getting married, and Megan was still grieving over the loss of a relationship and the death of her mother. Until now, there have been few accounts of a couple that addresses the themes of disability, intimacy, and marriage. Ink in the Wheels: Stories to Make Love Roll delves into themes of family influences and dynamics, creating external and internal support networks, direct support staff and the balance of care giving, losing faith in one another and themselves—and finding it again.

Watch the book trailer here.

With a BA in Creative Writing from the University of Arizona, Barton has created for himself and his family a life that speaks to his deepest values. His passion for helping others grow is evident in his writing, teaching martial arts, and life coaching, not to mention his ever-optimistic approach to life. He has written on disability-related issues for The Raleigh News & Observer, ABILITY Magazine, the NC Council on Developmental Disabilities, Persona Magazine, the NC Office on Disability & Health, and the NC Disability Action Network.

With a BA in English/Creative Journaling from Randolph-Macon Woman’s College, Megan has focused her writing efforts by organizing local literary events and supporting the local writing community. Studying Aboriginal oral tradition in Alice Springs, Australia, she has distinctive ability to see many angles of the story and uses joy and laughter to honor these essential aspects of our stories.

Megan has published clips in Natural Awakenings, Med Monthly, News & Observer (North Raleigh News), Circa, and Jubilation. Her writing features local community organizations, emphasizes local sustainability, and brings together different communities into common goals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Another F-Word: A Novel by Lissa Brown

CreateSpace
Kindle, $6.99 / Paperback, $15.95
ISBN: 978-1481908450
January, 2013
Fiction
Available at www.Amazon.com

Gentle Rory Calhoun Wilson is the antithesis of the 1950s cowboy he’s named for. He loathes sports, NASCAR, and everything else his father adores, putting the two on a collision course fueled by Darrell Wilson’s inability to control contempt for his son’s emerging homosexuality. Another F-Word is a story of bullying, courage, and love. It examines parental struggles to support a gay child, the role that schools and religious institutions play, the tragedy of teen suicide, and the ability of a rural Bible Belt boy to remain open to people who can influence his life in remarkable ways. Rory’s is a story of triumph over the scarring effects of being labeled and bullied.

Each of Lissa Brown’s careers has contributed to her current one, full-time author. She gained insight into adolescent behavior as a high school teacher and honed her writing skills and sense of the absurd during award-winning careers in marketing and public relations. She’s been a media consultant to gubernatorial and legislative campaigns, a columnist, and speechwriter for public officials and corporate executives. She is the author of a humorous memoir, a young adult novel, and several published articles and essays. Another F-Word is her latest novel. www.lissabrownwrites.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

School of the Americas by David Rigsbee

Black Lawrence Press
$14.00, paperback
ISBN: 978-0-9837945-0-9
January, 2013
Poetry
Available from the publisher, your local bookstore, or www.Amazon.com

"David Rigsbee's poems move with philosophical intensities. The perspectives the poems offer are complex, highly nuanced, rooted in critical engagements with a cultural tradition, and often less comfortable than the refusal of perspective practiced by more vertiginous writers."
—Robert McNama

David Rigsbee is the author of 18 books and chapbooks, including seven previous full-length collections of poems. His latest books, The Red Tower: New & Selected Poems and The Pilot House, a Black River Poetry Prize Chapbook, were both recently released. In addition to his poems, he has also published critical works on Carolyn Kizer and Joseph Brodsky. He has co-edited two anthologies, including Invited Guest: An Anthology of Twentieth Century Southern Poetry, a “notable book” selection of the American Library Association and the American Association of University Professors and featured on C-Span Booknotes. His work has appeared in The American Poetry Review, The Georgia Review, The Iowa Review, The New Yorker, The Iowa Review, The Ohio Review, Poetry, Prairie Schooner, The Sewanee Review, The Southern Review, and many others. Winner of the Pound Prize and the Vachel Lindsay Award, he has also been recipient of fellowships and awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, The Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, The Virginia Commission on the Arts, The Djerassi Foundation, and the Academy of American Poets. He is 2010 winner of the Sam Ragan Award for contribution to the arts in North Carolina. Rigsbee is currently contributing editor for The Cortland Review.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

America One: The Launch by TI Wade

TI Wade
$5.99, Kindle
ASIN: B00B2GC0IQ
January, 2013
Fiction
Available at www.Amazon.com

Ryan Richmond has dreamed about going to space since the age of seven. Reading space updates—and seeing pictures of Neil Armstrong on the lunar surface in National Geographic—was the ignition of this dream.

At nineteen he sold his first company and employed the remnants of the Russian Space Program, three of the best space brains in the world.

In his twenties he founded and sold two more companies and hired the most outstanding scientists and engineers from the European Space Authority.

During his thirties, after selling his third company, he invested heavily in Internet start-ups, like Google, netting billions.

Then he patiently waited until NASA’s shuttle program came to an end and contracted the best brains in the U.S. Space program.

Now, Ryan Richmond is in his forties, and still wants to go to space.

The only problem is that the newly elected Administration and members of Congress don’t have a current space program, and they want his!

TI Wade grew up in Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe), and once he completed his mandatory military commitments at 23, left Africa to mature in Europe. He enjoyed Europe and lived in three countries throughout fifteen years: England, Germany and Portugal. He enjoyed learning their ways of life, and languages, before returning to Africa: Cape Town in 1989. There he owned and ran a restaurant, a coffee manufacturing and retail business, flew a Cessna 210 around desolate southern Africa, and achieved marriage in 1992.

Due to the upheavals of the political turmoil in South Africa, the Wade family of three moved to the United States in 1996. Park City, Utah, was where his writing career began in 1997. To date, he has written nine novels. Currently, he lives with his wife and two teenage children twenty miles south of Raleigh. His first series, INVASION USA, has been a top-selling hit series, addressing the question, What could happen if every bit of technology created in China in the past thirty years were to all shut down at once? His current series, AMERICA ONE, is another hard-hitting series, with a greater focus on technology and space exploration.

TI Wade is on the web at www.tiwade.com.

 

The heart of the North Carolina Writers’ Network beats in response to the needs and requests of its members. Its members are the poets, novelists, essayists, writers of short stories, flash fiction, nonfiction, novellas—all the vibrantly talented wordsmiths we have, who live and work across our state, from the western tip of our Blue Ridge Mountains to the wide, sandy beaches of our eastern shores.

What does the NCWN mean to me, personally? Let me set the scene …

Timing is just about everything. Well, it certainly was on the day I received the worst critique of my life. I’m sure you know the type: learned author reads your sentences aloud. Shakes his head, disgusted. Your BP ramps up like you’ve just run the mile. You wait for his feedback and pray it won’t slice you to red-ribbon shreds. It shoots out like poison arrows from his lips: “I don’t know, Jan. Maybe you should think about going back to school.” (Insert shower scene from Psycho here; he is killing you.)

Time moved at glacial speeds for me after that day. I did not write for six months. My bruised heart thumped erratically. I cried at the oddest intervals, and I was making my spouse sick. One day, the Hubs said, “Dear, you have got to do something different.”

Of course, I gave him the stink eye because his timing seemed to suck. In truth though, it was perfect. Online, I input my membership data to the NCWN’s user-friendly Web site and rediscovered such delicious entrees as their guide to literary agents, calendar of upcoming events, Hats Off, resource links, and writing competitions. In the dessert section, Submit It, I read the call for submissions by a well-known publisher in Winston-Salem.

The deadline for their Open Awards was a few months off, so I decided to enter. What’d I have to loose? Soon, my computer and I were back on track. I wrote every day for the next six months and submitted everything I’d written to Press 53. One of my pieces earned a spot on the finalist list (2008), and I floated to cloud nine and back. I felt a whole lot smarter about the timing of things, not to mention, clearer on the fundamental definition of who my community needed to be. By the way, my novella, Hard Times and Happenstance, won first place honors in the 2009 Press 53 Open Awards Anthology and will be published this fall.

So, what does the NCWN mean to me personally? It is where my tender fellow writers and poets—the ones who speak in special tongues, the ones who shape-shift the world into a place we can actually bear (or stop putting up with) come together—online or at a conference, at a reading or via phone. It is where we can be counted and a place we can feel at home. The North Carolina Writers’ Network is my community. Together, we make the best of good times better.

So, dear, if you’re not a member already, do something different today. Join. You’ll thank yourself tomorrow for the good timing you had today. See you, Jan.

 

"Writing the New South is a brilliant, exciting, and NECESSARY project---sign me up, count me in! The 'New South' is a cauldron of change, a fertile field of art, a proving ground  for new possibilities.  I can't wait to see what everyone has to say, and in what genres. This is a real opportunity for us all to deepen our understanding of where we live, who we are, and what we believe in."

--Lee Smith

 

Like it or not, North Carolinians are living in momentous times.

The state is home to two of the world’s largest military bases, as wars continue in Iraq and Afghanistan. The state was home to two of the nation’s largest banks, until one was sold to keep it from collapsing. The state once known as a bulwark for Republican presidential candidates voted Democratic in a record-setting election.

A state long known for explosive growth is in danger of losing jobs and population. A state long Red turned Blue, and elected its first female governor.

While no one can predict what will happen, every North Carolinian can and should record what has happened, and how it felt as it happened – especially North Carolina’s writers. It has been said that one cannot spit in North Carolina without hitting a writer. Here is an opportunity for all those writers to do something for the people of this state, something that can provide understanding and perhaps even comfort during these tumultuous times.

With the coming of the New Year, the North Carolina Writers’ Network will launch a program called “Writing the New South,” offering its members a platform to record and share their experiences and interpretations of living in North Carolina as North Carolina changes dramatically.

“Whether they do so through essays, short stories, poetry, or even letters or journals, we want our members to grapple with what’s going on in the state and in the world,” Ed Southern, executive director of the North Carolina Writers’ Network, said. “We are North Carolina writers living in a historic moment for North Carolina. We need to be writing about what’s happening around us, to us, to our families and friends and neighbors.”

The Network has created a special section on its website – http://www.ncwriters.org/features/writing-the-new-south - for submissions to Writing the New South. Network members can upload their poems, stories, essays, or other submissions. Each submission will be reviewed by qualified editors, and the best of the submissions will be displayed online. The Network is also in discussions to have the submissions compiled and published in book form.

“We’re looking for submissions, in whatever genre, that will approach the world around us with imagination, depth, and responsibility,” Southern said.

The first Writing the New South work, by award-winning novelist (and Network member) Lee Smith, is a “postcard” from Hillsborough, where Smith lives.

“Writing the New South is a brilliant, exciting, and necessary project … The ‘New South’ is a  cauldron of change, a fertile field of art, a proving ground  for new possibilities,” Smith said. “I can’t wait to see what everyone has to say, and in what genres. This is a real opportunity for us all to deepen our understanding of where we live, who we are, and what we believe in.”

Southern said, “In the tradition of the New Deal-era WPA Writers’ Project, the goal of Writing the New South is to show the essential and public value of our writers, while creating a record of, and a frame for understanding, our times.”


 

 “Writing the New South” Submission Guidelines

 

-       Authors must be current members of the North Carolina Writers’ Network.

-       Submissions must be no longer than 5,000 words.

-       Submissions may be in any genre: fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, drama, journalism, etc.

-       Submissions must deal with one (or both) of two themes:

1.       Current or recent events of historical significance (for example: gas shortage of fall 2008, 2008 election, 2008 financial crisis, wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, etc.) as they relate to life in present-day North Carolina;

2.      Snapshots of life in a particular city or region of North Carolina, in 500 words or less.

-       Submissions do not have to be objective; however, submissions may not proselytize or attempt to convert readers to any particular viewpoint, political affiliation, or religion.

-       Submissions must be original and unpublished.

-       The Network reserves the right to reject any submission.

-       Accepted submissions will be considered for publication in a possible anthology.  By submitting their work to Writing the New South, authors agree to execute whatever steps are necessary in the event that their work is selected for such an anthology.

 

 

 

About the North Carolina Writers’ Network

 

Founded in 1985, the nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is one of the largest statewide literary arts organization in the country. The mission of the North Carolina Writers’ Network is to connect, promote, and lead emerging writers and established writers through workshops, conferences, and other programs and services. The Network builds audiences for literature, advocates for the literary arts and for literacy, and provides information and support services for writers of all kinds and at all levels.

Talking at the Table: Food Writing in the New SouthProminent southern food writers, cookbook authors and culinary instructors will gather to share favorite stories and insights into food traditions of the South February 15 in Chapel Hill. The public is invited.

The North Carolina Writers’ Network is sponsoring the event, which will also include live bluegrass music and southern dishes.

Tickets are $50, with proceeds going to support the work of the Writers’ Network. Register here.

The panel discussion will be held from 5 p.m. until 7 p.m. at the Horace Williams House at 610 Rosemary St. in Chapel Hill. Speakers will include:

  • John Shelton Reed and Dale Volberg Reed, authors of Holy Smoke: The Big Book of North Carolina Barbecue.
  • Bill Smith, head chef at Crook’s Corner restaurant in Chapel Hill and author of Seasoned in the South.
  • Debbie Moose, former News & Observer food editor and author of Wings: More Than 50 High-Flying Recipes for America’s Favorite Snack.
  • Marcie Cohen Ferris, author of Matzoh Ball Gumbo: Culinary Tales of the Jewish South.
  • Sheri Castle, culinary instructor and contributor to Cornbread Nation 3.

The panel will be moderated by diet and health columnist Suzanne Havala Hobbs.

The authors will be available to sign books sold at the event.

Tickets are available at Market Street Books in Southern Village, Chapel Hill; by calling (919) 251-9140; or by visiting the North Carolina Writers’ Network online at http://www.ncwriters.org/.

Discounted annual membership rates are available at the event to first-time NCWN members for $55, or $20 off the regular rate.

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is our state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development.

For additional information, visit http://www.ncwriters.org/.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Extinction by H.V. Purvis

Second Wind Publishing Co.
$13.95, paperback / $4.99, e-book
ISBN 978-1-938101-60-1
October, 2013
Fiction
Available from www.Amazon.com

Try to imagine a future where almost all your family and friends become infected with a virus that made them stronger and more agile, grow fur, develop claws, lose the ability to reason or be able to speak and become murderously violent toward anyone not infected. Now imagine this rage being so consuming that they continue to attack until either they or you are dead.

This is the world in which our heroes find themselves. What must they do to survive? Are there other survivors out there?

Hoyle Purvis, who writes under the name H.V. Purvis, was born in 1952 and reared in the country between High Falls and Bennett in central North Carolina. Raised in the country, he learned to raise animals, farm, handle guns, shoot, ride horses and spent many hours daily riding the trails around his home.

His talents in music lead to an Associate in Arts degree in music from Sandhills Community College, a Bachelor in Arts in music education from Pfeiffer University and a Masters in music from Appalachian State University. After college, he worked as a church music director and taught high school chorus and theatre. In 1992, he left teaching and started Purvis Appraisals, a real estate appraisal business.

He has three children from his first marriage. He considers them to be three of his best friends.

He and Ally, his current wife, live on a small ranch in Scotland County adjoining forty-three thousand acres of State wildlife preserve. They have eleven horses, a faithful dog, an affectionate cat, some Guinea hens and a few chickens. They ride regularly on the wildlife preserve, at the beach, and in the mountains.

Purvis is an avid reader. Several years ago, he and his active imagination developed a story idea. He wrote it out and began to developed it into the Extinction series. That story and the encouragement he received from his friends and family have led to an obsession for writing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 A Piece of Calm by Sally Stewart Mohney

Finishing Line Press
$14.00, paperback
Poetry
March, 2014
Available for pre-order from the publisher

"Sally Stewart Mohney gives us vivid insights into nature and family in these excellent poems, but what I admire just as much is the superb sound-play in her poetry."
—Ron Rash, author of Sabrina

"Sally Stewart Mohney’s poems sing with mystery, but they are never ethereal, never ephemeral or buried in obliquity. Instead, Mohney’s world is rooted in stunning imagery and clarity, and her poems are designed with care and grace. They are bold, luminous, and tender, gathered together to form vivid silences that reside in both heart and mind. Their lyricism and incandescence demand multiple readings. Mohney is a new and significant voice in American poetry."
—William Wright, editor of The Southern Poetry Anthology

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reversal by Eric Linne

CreateSpace
$13.99, paperback / $6.99, e-book
ISBN: 978-0-1492196549
November, 2013
Fiction—Young Adult
Available from your local bookstore or www.Amazon.com

Fourteen-year-old Kayla Burbadge has had one tough life. She's lost her parents, been forced to move from bustling Chicago to a small Indiana farm town, and starts high school with no friends. How tough is she? When a janitor sees her fighting an older boy who made the mistake of picking on her, the janitor offers her a unique opportunity. Reluctantly, Kayla accepts and the new kid in school becomes the first and only girl to compete in a male-dominated environment. As Kayla battles her way through her new endeavor, her self-confidence grows as she bonds with her new allies. Her emotional growth helps her connect with her new family and display empathy for other students who are suffering. In the end, she faces a final pivotal challenge—a challenge that means not only victory for her, but a job for the janitor who believed in her.

Reversal is a realistic, present-day novel which merges a coming-of-age drama with a fast-action sports story. The novel explores the themes of family, home, community, unlikely heroes, discovering one's voice, and finding equilibrium after a major life event.

Eric Linne has a BA in English from Indiana University and MA in English from University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Prior to embarking on a writing career, he worked as a consultant for community health centers nationwide and and served as Director for Home Care for the American Hospital Association. After several years as a stay-at-home father, Eric wrote his first screenplay, The Bears of Blue River, adapted from the novel of the same name. The young adult novel Reversal, which he wrote as his Master's Thesis in Children's Literature, is his debut novel. He is excited to see where Kayla's career leads.

Hats Off! to Linda Heuring whose short story "Without Goosebumps" appears in Rosebud, Issue 56.

Hats Off! to Mark J. Havlik whose poem “The Lamb" appears in issue number 68 of Kaleidoscope: Exploring the Experience of Disability through Literature and the Fine Arts. Unique to the field of disability studies, the publication has expressed the experiences of disability from the perspective of individuals, families, friends, caregivers, and healthcare professionals, among others, since 1979.

Hats Off! to Fuquay-Varina's Third Thursday Open Mic, which was featured in the Southwest Wake News. Led by Jan B. Parker, this event gathers professional and novice writers from all over the Triangle at 6:00 pm at the Stars Theater & Arts Center. There is a Featured Reader, and Open Mic participants read for five minutes each.

Hats Off! to Malinda Fillingim whose article "Riding Bikes to Church" has been selected for publication in Carolina Country.

Hats Off! to Jan B. Parker who has a short story in Voices From the Porch, a new anthology from Main Street Rag. She also has a short story in Writing Through Your Divorce: The Blog.

Hats Off! to Terri Kirby Erickson whose award-winning poem, "Angels of Death," from her forthcoming collection, A Lake of Light and Clouds, (which will be published by Press 53 in April), has been set to music by composer and Vice President of Education for the New York Philharmonic, Theodore Wiprud, as part of a cycle for soprano, on varied poems of life, death, and nature. Wiprud refers to the poem as, "a humorous take on mortality that sneaks up on you," from a book of poems that "opens from the everyday onto the profound."

Hats off! to Thomas Wolf, whose short story, “Boundaries,” winner of the 2011 Doris Betts Fiction Prize, was nominated for a Pushcart Prize and received “Special Mention” in the 2014 edition of Pushcart Prize XXXVIII: Best of the Small Presses.

Hats Off! to Margaret A. Harrell who will be having a reading/talk/signing event at the 2014 annual Gonzo Fest in Louisville, Kentucky, for her memoirs (Keep This Quiet! My Relationship with Hunter S. Thompson, Milton Klonsky, and Jan Mensaert AND Keep THIS Quiet Too!). Others presenters include William McKeen (Outlaw Journalist), Anita Thompson (The Gonzo Way), and legendary musician David Amram. Sony Pictures will debut the Ralph Steadman documentary For No Good Reason at the Louisville Palace Theatre during the GonzoFest, weeks before its national release.

Hats Off! to Malinda Fillingim whose story "Bathroom Blessings" has been accepted by Guideposts to be published in May, 2014.

Hats Off! to Charles "LC" Fiore, whose short story "The Trench Garden," was published by Ploughshares as part of their "Solos" series. Amazon.com also chose "The Trench Garden" for their exclusive Kindle Singles series. "The Trench Garden" can be purchased for $0.99 here.

Hats Off to Laurel Ferejohn whose flash memoir piece "Worrisome Thing" has been accepted by Quiddity International Literary Journal.

Hats Off! to Kim Church whose debut novel, Byrd (Dzanc Books, March 2014), has been named one of the top 20 to-read books of the year (David Abrams, The Quivering Pen). Set in North Carolina and points west, Byrd is the fragmented family history of a child given up for adoption.

Hats Off! to Jan B. Parker whose story "A New and Different Summer," an excerpt from her novel-in-progress, will be published by GERM magazine.

Hats Off! to Marilynn Barner Anselmi whose script, Found Objects, has been named a semi-finalist for the 2014 Eugene O'Neill Playwrights Conference. This is the third consecutive year her work has made it to the semi-finalist stage.

Hats Off! to Steve Cushman whose poetry manuscript In Training received an Honorable Mention in the first annual Lena M. Shull Book Contest from the North Carolina Poetry Society.

Hats Off! to Becky Gould Gibson whose manuscript Heading Home won the first annual Lena M. Shull Book Contest. The Lena Shull Book Contest was recently created by an endowment from the North Carolina Poetry Council. Gibson will receive $250 and 50 copies of her book, which will be published by Main Street Rag. The award will be presented to her on Poetry Day at Catawba Valley Community College in April 2014.

Hats Off! to Erika Hoffman who had two stories selected as finalists for Chicken Soup for the Soul: Multitasking Mom’s Survival Guide. One is called “BUSY!,” and the other “Frenzied.” Both stories will be published in the anthology.

Hats Off! to Malinda Fillingim whose story "The Marine and I" was a finalist in the inaugural memoir writing contest sponsored by Salt, a Wilmington-based magazine. Also, her story "Lucy the Lunchroom Lady" was recently accepted for publication in Guideposts.

Hats Off! to Heather Adams, Caryn Sutorus, and Pam Van Dyk who received Honorable Mentions in the 2013 Fiction Contest sponsored by The Writers' Workshop.

Hats Off! to Erika Hoffman whose essay "Real Time" has been accepted by Mature Years. This is the ninth piece of hers they have taken.

Hats Off! to Malinda Fillingim whose story "Easter Bells" has been published in the Spring 2014 edition of Ideals, a publication of Guidepost.

Hats Off! to Tim Swink. The January issue of O.Henry Magazine is going to publish a chapter excerpt from his novel, Curing Time.

.... to Tony Brown. He  will have his short story, "A Once In A Lifetime Thing" published in Down in the Dirt magazine in April, 2011. "The Easter Gift" was published in the September 2010 issue of The Storyteller.



. . . to Jan B. Parker, who earned Second Place in the Methodist University 2011 Emerging Writers Contest as judged by Lorraine Lopez, and will read from her work, "Mayme," at the Southern Writers' Symposium on February 26. Please visit http://www.methodist.edu/sws/index.htm for more detailed information.

Publishers Weekly and BookList wrote favorable reviews of David Halperin's new book, Journal of a UFO Investigator. You can read these on David Halperin's website

Halperin will also be  doing a series of guest blogs for www.litfestmagazine.com

Rachel Pollock's piece entitled, "Until Morale Improves" was included in the anthology, Confessions: Fact or Fiction?,  edited by Herta Feely.

Website: http://www.amazon.com/Confessions-Herta-Feely-Chrysalis-Editorial/dp/1609106091/

 

Hats Off to Lookout Books, the literary imprint of the UNC-Wilmington's creative writing department. The imprint's debut novel, Binocular Vision: New & Selected Short Stories,  by Edith Pearlman, was featured on the cover of the New York Times Book Review's January 16 edition.

 

 

An excerpt from K. S. Crawford's historical novel, Keowee, was published in Wilderness House Literary Review, No. 5, Vol. 4 (www.whlreview.com).

NCWN member Mary Lambeth Moore has published her first novel, Sleeping with Patty Hearst (www.sleepingwithpattyhearst.com), with Tigress Publishing.  Lee Smith says "I got completely swept up ... Moore is a natural storyteller with a great story to tell in this novel."  Mary, a native of Reidsville, NC who now lives in Raleigh, has been a member of the NCWN since our beginning.


NCWN member Bill Cissna’s second full-length play script, All About Faith, will have a public stage reading on January 28 at Theatre Alliance, Winston-Salem. His short script, Communication Gap, will be one of 10 produced in Evening of Short Plays #24 at the Greensboro Cultural Center, February 10-13.

Rebecca Clay Haynes published her first short story, As She Lay Dying, in the Fall 2010 Edition of The Binnacle, published by the University of Maine. (Unfortunately, the issue is not yet posted online, but the print version is available.)

 

Hats Off! to Terry L. Kennedy, who has a poem in the latest issue of Heavy Feather Review!

 

Hats Off! to Ross White, who has three new poems in BODY.

 

The Hendersonville Times-News reported that Susan Snowden’s new novel made Fountainhead Bookstore’s bestseller list for 2012. Although it came out in August, it captured spot No. 2 on the list. Here’s an excerpt from the Jan. 6 article: “In the No. 2 slot is another local author, Susan Snowden, with her debut novel Southern Fried Lies. Although Snowden has been published in many literary journals, this is her first novel. Through word-of-mouth alone, Southern Fried Lies quickly climbed the bestselling list, even beating out Fifty Shades of Grey." Susan has been a NCWN writer since 1996 when she moved to the mountains from Atlanta.

 

Hats Off! to William Wortman, Jr., of Statesville, who received an Honorable Mention in the 2012 Memoirs Contest sponsored by the Writers' Workshop.

 

Hats Off! to Megan M. Cutter, who announced the release of her new book, Ink in the Wheels: Stories to Make Love Roll, which she co-authored with S. Barton. Ink in the Wheels depicts the journey of an inter-ability married couple as they explore the courage and perseverance to thrive in a relationship. A Valentine’s Day Appreciation Event and Pre-Release Party will be held on Friday, February 8, at the Marbles Kid's Museum in Raleigh.

 

Hats Off! to Ruth Moose, who had a poem in Narrative Arts that was quilted and will hang in the National Institute of Health. She also placed a poem in O'Henry Magazine, Tar River, and a short story in Pine Straw. She has also won a top award in the St. Louis Jung Society competition.

 

Hats Off! to Malaika King Albrecht, whose poetry collection What the Trapeze Artist Trusts (Press 53) was praised by 2013 Oscar Arnold Young Award Final Judge Robert Lee Brewer. He said, “Albrecht invites the reader to join her on the poetic trapeze act she performs” but “is always there, ready to catch the reader before sending her off again.”

 

Hats Off! to Linda Heuring, whose short story, "Betty's Branch," was published in the September issue of 42 Magazine. Also, her short story, "One Chair Away," is in the fall issue of Concho River Review, and her story, "Bordering on Sainthood," is due out in Kestrel 29, which will be shipped to readers next week.

 

Hats Off! to Henry F. Tonn, whose essay-memoir “The French, and Being Odd,” has been accepted by the online lit mag Lowestoft Chronicles, to be published March 1.

 

Hats Off! to Tom Hooker, winner of the 2012 Fountainhead Bookstore Fiction Contest. He will read his winning story, "The Grand Child," on Saturday, January 19 at 5:00 pm at the Fountainhead Bookstore in Hendersonville. A reception will follow.

 

Hats Off! to Rosemary Royston, whose poetry appears in the current issue of Flycatcher: A Journal of Native Imagination. This is the inaugural issue of Flycatcher.

 

Hats Off! to Lookout Books and Edith Pearlman, whose collection, Binocular Vision: New and Selected Stories , was named a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award.

 

Hats Off! to Ross White, who pulled off a Hat Trick in the 2011 Poetry Council of North Carolina Awards. His poem “Babies Hurtling Several Stories” won the Gladys Owings Hughes Heritage Award (free verse); his poem "“Facts about Early America” incorporated rhyming couplets to win the Charles Shull Award (traditional poetry); and his “Address to Monarchs” won the James Larkin Pearson Award (free verse).

 

Hats Off! to poets Alice Osborn and Jane Shlensky, who were both finalists in two award categories in the 2011 Poetry Council of North Carolina Awards. Alice placed Third in the Charles Shull (traditional poetry) category with her poem "Featured Reader," and received an Honorable Mention in the James Larkin Pearson (free verse) category for her poem, "The Lesbians Next Door." Meanwhile, Jane Shlensky placed Third in the Gladys Owings Hughes Heritage category (free verse) for her poem, "The Museum of Broken Things," and received an Honorable Mention in the Ellen Johnston-Hale category (humorous verse) for her poem, "Patience."

 

Hats Off! to four NCWN members who were finalists for the 2011 Oscar Arnold Young Award, sponsored by the Poetry Council of North Carolina. Katherine Soniat won for her book, The Swing Girl. Julie Suk was runner-up with her collection, Lie Down with Me. And honorable mentions went to Susan M. Lefler (Rendering the Bones) and Joanna Catherine Scott (An Innocent in the House of the Dead).

 

Hats Off! to Kim Boykin, whose fiction debut, The Wisdom of Hair, sold to Berkley for publication in the spring of 2013. Her novel tells the story of a young woman who escapes an impoverished background to find her calling "fixing" hair, and along the way discovers what real love is and what it isn't from a quirky community of lovable women.

 

 

Hats Off! to Katherine Soniat, who was named the recipient of this year’s Oscar Arnold Young Award for the best book of poetry from North Carolina for her collection entitled The Swing Girl, published by Louisiana State University Press.

. to Linda Beatrice Brown.  Her novel Black Angels has been honored as one of the Best of the Best Books of the Year 2009 by the Chicago Public Library. The notice reads: “The Chicago Public Library selects books that meet high standards of writing and illustration and that have a significant curriculum link. The Best of the Best list is presented in workshops to hundreds of public and school librarians from across Chicago, distributed to bookstores and put into wide release in the Chicago media.”  Brown is the Willa B. Player Distinguished Professor of the Humanities at Bennett College in Greensboro, NC.  Black Angels is published by Penguin Putnam; you can learn more at www.lindabeatricebrown.com.

Hat's Off to Joey Olschner and his poem, "The Long Horn" which is now online at The Dead Mule. This is his first and only epic which attempts its own Homeric Journey through the Carolina tapestry of time and space. More of his work may be seen and experienced at his blog, http://oceanjoe.wordpress.com/.

... to Bill Griffin.  Kay Byer has kindly listed him as Poet of the Week with excerpts from  Snake
Den Ridge, a bestiary.  Please take a look  at her kind and generous comments .
. .

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