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RALEIGH—At the North Carolina Writers' Network 2016 Fall Conference, November 4-6 in Raleigh, author and PR expert Linda Rohrbough will lead a session titled "Marketing Tips and Principles for Book Promotion in Today’s World."

Registration for the North Carolina Writers' Network 2016 Fall Conference is open.

Most writers, self-published or not, know marketing and promotion isn’t just for the publisher anymore. It’s a survival tactic for any writer who wants to thrive in today’s electronic world. This workshop by award-winning author Linda Rohrbough will give you the latest techniques for how to create and execute a workable marketing plan, even if you have limited resources. You’ll learn the three biggest mistakes all writers make, marketing principles that always work (especially in social media), how to eliminate resistance, where to find marketing opportunities and how to make the most of them once you have them. Come hear Linda deliver the goods for what works in today’s world in a fun, practical, no-nonsense way.

We asked Linda, "What is one piece of advice you'd give your younger, writer self?"

“If I had to say just one thing, I think I’d tell my younger self, 'Stop trying to be so different.' The one thing I wanted the most as a young writer was to be different. I wanted to break new ground, reach new heights, go where no man has gone before. (That ought to give you a hint what generation I grew up in.)

The result of what I tried to do in the beginning was I mixed genres. I saw other bestselling writers do it all the time. I saw Debbie Macomber write romances that had angels (romance and speculative fiction), and Michael Crichton’s suspense novels added technology that bordered on science fiction (suspense and science fiction). And, of course, Stephen King, who mixed all kinds of genres into his speculative fiction, does all kinds of things outside the box.

But what I didn’t realize was each of those writers started writing inside the box. For example, Debbie started writing category romance novels. The kind where the editor says on page so and so they should kiss and by page so and so they are making wedding plans. Crichton started writing westerns while he was in medical school. Those are about as inside the box as you can get. But if you want to make money writing, you need to write first, what people want to read and second, what publishers are willing to take a risk on. And that’s inside-the-box stuff. Because bringing a new writer on board is already a risk in the publisher’s mind.

As one of my best writer friends, Jodi Thomas, puts it, 'Write the same thing, only a little different.'

The bottom line is you’re building something. And that takes time. You need the ability to earn the trust of the people you want to work with, which means your agent, your editor, and your readers, before you can deliberately be different.

What I didn’t realize is I’m already a little different. (If you haven’t noticed, most writers are.)

So if I’m just myself and I tell the stories we all experience, but with my particular twist, it’ll already be just a little bit different. And once I’ve gained the trust of the readers and publishing community, finding that right mix between my voice and what readers want to read, I too made writing my day job. Which I think is what most of us want. And then if I want to insert an angel or some far-fetched tech, I can get away with it.

So just have the courage to be yourself. Even if it feels ordinary, it’s different enough.”

Linda Rohrbough has been writing since 1989, and has more than 5,000 articles and seven books to her credit, along with writing for television, and seven national awards for her fiction and nonfiction. An iPhone App of Linda’s popular “Pitch Your Book” workshop is available in the Apple iTunes store. Visit her website: www.LindaRohrbough.com.

Register for NCWN's 2016 Fall Conference now at www.ncwriters.org.

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to all writers, in all genres, at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

 


RALEIGH—At the North Carolina Writers' Network 2016 Fall Conference, November 4-6 in Raleigh, poet and bookstore owner Chris Tonelli will lead the session "The Furniture of the Poem: The Space of the Page and How We Fill It."

Registration for the North Carolina Writers' Network 2016 Fall Conference is open, but pre-registration closes Friday, October 28. Don't delay!

Poets, by nature, are obsessive. While this serves us well during the invention phase of writingwe tend to gather and become attached to plenty of interesting materialit can lead to a kind of hoarding. And like in a physical space, we are typically very good at justifying each saved thing's existence and navigating through the clutter they create. Unfortunately, our readers are probably not, nor should we expect them to be. This workshop will be focused on identifying the essential and non-essential elements of a poem and their optimal arrangement, both syntactically and formally. Each participant should send in advance of the workshop three unpublished poems, as a single PDF or Word attachment, to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., and bring at least twenty copies of each poem to the workshop. In addition to providing material for discussion, these poems will be considered for publication in So & So Magazine.

We asked Chris, “What is one piece of advice that you would give to your younger writer self?”

"Don't expect anything from poetrypursuing your version of the perfect poem needs to be enough. You and your poems will suffer if you're looking for it to do more."

Chris Tonelli works in the libraries at North Carolina State University and co-owns So & So Books in downtown Raleigh, where he lives with his wife, Allison, and their two kids, Miles and Vera. He is a founding editor of the independent poetry press Birds, LLC, and he curates the So & So Series and edits So & So Magazine. He is the author of five chapbooks and a full-length collection, The Trees Around (Birds, LLC).

Register for NCWN's 2016 Fall Conference now at www.ncwriters.org.

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to all writers, in all genres, at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

 

Raleigh—Pre-registration for the North Carolina Writers' Network 2016 Fall Conference ends Friday at midnight, which means you have only four days to lock in a 25 percent discount by signing up early.

NCWN's 2016 Fall Conference runs November 4-6 at the Raleigh Marriott Crabtree Valley. Register now at www.ncwriters.org.

This year's programming includes general sessions such as:

The NCWN 2016 Fall Conference is the largest annual writing event in the state and one of the largest and most inclusive in the country.

Save money by registering before Friday: www.ncwriters.org.

 

 
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