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CARRBORO—Georgann Eubanks has joined the North Carolina Writers' Network Board of Trustees, by unanimous vote prior to the December board meeting.

Georgann Eubanks is the author of the Literary Trails series commissioned by the North Carolina Arts Council and published by UNC Press. She is a writer, teacher, and consultant with more than thirty years of experience in the non-profit sector. Since 2000, she has been a principal with Donna Campbell in Minnow Media, LLC, an Emmy-winning multimedia production company that primarily creates independent documentaries for public television.

Eubanks has taught creative writing as a guest artist in public schools and prisons, at UNC-Chapel Hill, and presently serves as the writing coach for the William C. Friday Fellows. For twenty years, Eubanks served as Director of the Duke University Writers’ Workshop, a summer writing program for adults, and is now leading the Table Rock Writers Workshop, held annually in Little Switzerland. Eubanks has published short stories, poems, reviews, and profiles in many magazines and journals including Oxford American, Bellingham Review, Southern Review, Boston Globe Sunday Magazine, and North American Review. She is a North Carolina Arts Council Literary Fellowship recipient.

A graduate of Duke University, Eubanks is also a former president of Arts North Carolina, a former chair of the NC Humanities Council, and is one of the founders of the NC Writers' Network. She is President-elect of the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association and serves on the board of Pocosin Arts in Columbia, NC. Her next book, The Month of Their Ripening: North Carolina Heritage Foods, is due out from UNC Press in 2018.

The North Carolina Writers' Network connects, promotes, and serves the writers of this state. It provides education in the craft and business of writing, opportunities for recognition and critique of literary work, resources for writers at all stages of development, support for and advocacy of the literary heritage of North Carolina, and a community for those who write. The North Carolina Writers’ Network believes that writing is necessary both for self-expression and a healthy community, that well-written words can connect people across time and distance, and that the deeply satisfying experiences of writing and reading should be available to everyone.

The non-profit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

 

GREENVILLE—The 2017 Doris Betts Fiction Prize is now open for submissions. The Doris Betts Fiction Prize awards the first-place winner $250 and publication in the North Carolina Literary Review. Finalists will also be considered for publication in NCLR.

The competition is for previously unpublished short stories up to 6,000 words. The Doris Betts Fiction Prize is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network. North Carolina Literary Review subscribers with North Carolina connections (lives or has lived in NC) are also eligible.

The deadline is Wednesday, February 15; submit here.

The final judge is NCLR fiction editor Liza Wieland. She the author of seven books and three collections of short fiction, including, most recently the novel Land of Enchantment. She has won two Pushcart Prizes, the Michigan Literary Fiction Prize, a Bridport Prize in the UK, and fellowships from The National Endowment for the Arts, The North Carolina Arts Council, and the Christopher Isherwood Foundation. She has recently been awarded a second fellowship from the North Carolina Arts Council. Her newest novel is Land of Enchantment.

For over twenty years, East Carolina University and the North Carolina Literary & Historical Association have published the North Carolina Literary Review, a journal devoted to showcasing the Tar Heel State’s literary excellence. Described by one critic as “everything you ever wanted out of a literary publication but never dared to demand,” the NCLR has won numerous awards and citations.

Doris Betts was the author of three short story collections and six novels. She won three Sir Walter Raleigh awards, the Southern Book Award, the North Carolina Award for Literature, the John Dos Passos Prize, and the American Academy of Arts and Letters Medal for the short story, among others. Beloved by her students, she was named the University of North Carolina Alumni Distinguished Professor of English in 1980. She was a 2004 inductee of the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame.

Anita Collins of Chapel Hill won the 2016 Doris Betts Fiction Prize for her story "The Anderson Kid," in which a diver works to find the body of a drowned swimmer. Compassionate yet focused, this suspenseful tale filled its readers with an "absolute need to see."

Taylor Brown’s “Rhino Girl,” which was also a compassionate but tough, economical story, won second place and also was selected for publication.

Here are the full guidelines for the 2017 Doris Betts Fiction Prize:

  • The competition is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network. North Carolina Literary Review subscribers with North Carolina connections (lives or has lived in NC) are also eligible.
  • The competition is for previously unpublished short stories up to 6,000 words. Multiple entries ok, but each requires a separate entry fee. No novel excerpts. Stories do NOT have to relate to NCLR’s annual special feature topic.
  • The deadline is Wednesday, February 15.
  • Simultaneous submissions ok, but please notify us immediately if your work is accepted elsewhere.
  • Submit previously unpublished stories online at https://nclr.submittable.com/submit.
  • Submittable will collect your entry fee via credit card ($10 NCWN members or NCLR subscribers / $20 for non-members/non-subscribers).
  • To pay submission fees by check or money order, make payable to the North Carolina Writers' Network and mail to: Ed Southern, PO Box 21591, Winston-Salem, NC 27120- 1591
  • Documents must be Microsoft Word or .rtf files. Author's name should not appear on manuscripts. (Submittable will collect and record your name and contact information.) If you have any problems submitting electronically, email NCLR's Submission Manager.
  • If submitting by mail, mail story manuscript with a cover sheet providing name, address, email address, word count, and manuscript title, to:

NCLR
ECU Mailstop
555 English
Greenville, NC 27858-4353
(but mail payment to the Network as per instructions above)

The winner and finalists will be announced by May 1. The winning story and select finalists will be published in the next year’s issue of the North Carolina Literary Review.

Questions may be directed to Margaret Bauer, Editor of the North Carolina Literary Review, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The non-profit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.


GREENVILLE—Registration is now open for the North Carolina Writers' Network's second online class, "Breaking Up Is Hard to Do," led by poet Gabrielle Brant Freeman.

The class will take place on Wednesday, January 25, at 7:00 pm, online. This course is capped at forty (40) registrants, first-come, first-served.

Breaking up is hard to do. At least, that’s what they say. When writing poetry, knowing how and where to break a line can seem difficult, so Gabrielle would like to suggest that bringing a sense of play to breaking up lines and line revision can make it easier and fun! In this workshop, participants will experiment with several methods of breaking lines. Using various texts, they will discuss how line breaks create rhythm, pace, and meaning for the reader. Participants will have the option to submit a short piece of writing prior to the workshop date to be used interactively. Specific details will be sent to registrants in advance of the class.

Gabrielle Brant Freeman's poetry has been published in many journals, most recently in Barrelhouse, Hobart, Melancholy Hyperbole, Rappahannock Review, storySouth, and Waxwing. She was nominated twice for the Best of the Net, and she was a 2014 finalist. Gabrielle won the 2015 Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition. Press 53 published her first book, When She Was Bad, in 2016. Gabrielle earned her MFA through Converse College. Read her poems and more at http://gabriellebrantfreeman.squarespace.com.

"Breaking Up Is Hard to Do" is the North Carolina Writers' Network's second offering in their 2016-2017 Winter Series. Additional online classes are planned for February and March.

"This new program initiative allows us to further our mission to connect and serve all the writers of North Carolina," said NCWN communications director Charles Fiore. "We view these online courses as a supplement to our current programs, and we remain committed to continuing to offer ample opportunities for all of us to get together face-to-face and in-person as well."

The online class "Breaking Up Is Hard to Do" is available to anyone with an internet connection. Instructions for accessing the online class on Wednesday, January 25, will be sent to registrants no less than twenty-four hours prior to the start of class.

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org

 

 
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