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RALEIGH—At the North Carolina Writers' Network 2016 Fall Conference, November 4-6 in Raleigh, award-winning author Jen McConnel will teach the class, "Young Adult/New Adult: What’s the Big Deal?"

YA and NA are thriving genres. But what, exactly, is the difference? We'll discuss what separates YA from NA, explore the areas where they are closely related, and practice writing both.

Jen McConnel is an award-winning author. She writes Young Adult and New Adult fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. When she isn’t writing, she can be found on her yoga mat, teaching, or wandering off on another adventure. She grew up in mid-Michigan, attending Western Michigan University, and now lives with her family in North Carolina. She holds a MS in Library Science from Clarion University of Pennsylvania, and she is currently working on her MA in Children’s Literature at Hollins University.

Registration for the North Carolina Writers' Network 2016 Fall Conference is open.

We asked Jen, “What is one piece of advice that you would give to your younger writer self?”

"Don't stop. Taking breaks isn't the same thing as quitting, and you'll need breaks to stay sane on this creative path, but avoid the temptation to actually stop and walk away. The stories aren't done with you yet."

Register now at www.ncwriters.org.

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to all writers, in all genres, at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

 

Durham—The North Carolina Writers' Network 2016 Fall Conference runs November 4-6 at the Raleigh Marriott Crabtree Valley, in Raleigh. The Network is thrilled to announce the following:

Carolina Wren Press is proud to sponsor a scholarship to the 2016 North Carolina Writers’ Network Fall Conference for a talented writer of color. The scholarship winner will receive registration for the Fall Conference, a 30-page manuscript critique from Carolina Wren Press editor and director Robin Miura, and will have the chance to meet Donna Miscolta, author of the forthcoming Bakwin Award−winning story collection Hola and Goodbye: Una Familia in Stories. To apply, send your current CV or résumé and a statement of writing intent—describing your background and goals as a writer—to Robin Miura at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Carolina Wren Press publishes quality writing, especially by writers historically neglected by mainstream publishing, and to develop diverse and vital audiences through publishing, outreach, and educational programs. Their authors include Chantel Acevedo, Quinn Dalton, and NC Literary Hall of Fame inductee Jaki Shelton Green.

At the NCWN 2016 Fall Conference, Robin Miura, editor at Carolina Wren Press, will serve as a Manuscript Mart reviewer. Robin manages and edits the Lee Smith Novel Prize and the Bakwin Award for Writing by a Woman. She has edited many different kinds of books during her sixteen-year publishing career, first as a production editor for Oxford University Press and then as a freelance editor for individual authors and for publishers including Algonquin Books, Duke University Press, and River’s Edge Media, among others. She now works mainly with fiction and memoir. She is also one of the founding editors of the online magazine South Writ Large (www.southwritlarge.com).

Robin will also sit on the popular Brilliant at Breakfast Panel Discussion, "Agents & Editors," on Sunday morning, along with Michelle Brower, Emma Patterson, and Kathy Pories.

Register for Fall Conference now at www.ncwriters.org.

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to all writers, in all genres, at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

 

RALEIGH—At the North Carolina Writers' Network 2016 Fall Conference, November 4-6 in Raleigh, Clare Beams, author of the forthcoming story collection We Show What We Have Learned (Lookout Books, 2016), will teach the fiction class, "Ending Well: Short Story Endings and Their Lessons."

Registration for the North Carolina Writers' Network 2016 Fall Conference is open.

Flannery O'Connor contended that the key to a short story’s success is “an action or a gesture which was both totally right and totally unexpected; it would have to be one that was both in character and beyond character; it would have to suggest both the world and eternity.” Because the weight of these demands often falls on a story’s ending, discovering the right way to end is among the most difficult of a fiction writer’s tasks. Through reading and discussion of brief published pieces, and using a short exercise or two, we’ll explore some of the hallmarks of the great short-story ending: that combination of surprise and inevitability that feels final but never, ever neat. Please bring the last page of a draft of a story you’ve written; you’ll be examining this page with fresh eyes to discover how your ending is working, how it could work even better, and how the flaws in your ending can help you recognize earlier flaws in your story and understand how to address them.

We asked Clare, “What is one piece of advice that you would give to your younger writer self?”

"Be patient. With the world's response to your writing, but especially with your writing itself. It needs more time than you're expecting—and more work—to become what you want it to be."

Clare Beams is the author of the forthcoming story collection We Show What We Have Learned (Lookout Books, 2016). Her stories appear in One Story, n+1, Ecotone, The Common, Kenyon Review, Hayden’s Ferry Review, and The Best American Nonrequired Reading, and have received special mention in The Best American Short Stories 2013 and The Pushcart Prize XXXV. She is the recipient of awards from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, and currently blogs for Ploughshares. After teaching high school English for six years in Falmouth, Massachusetts, she moved with her husband and daughter to Pittsburgh, where she teaches creative writing at Saint Vincent College and the Pittsburgh Center for the Arts.

Register for NCWN's 2016 Fall Conference now at www.ncwriters.org.

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to all writers, in all genres, at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

 

 
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