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WINSTON-SALEM—On Wednesday, October 11, at 7:00 pm, the North Carolina Writers' Network will host our second Online Open Mic.

Registration is full. Keep an eye on the website and our social media channels for information about how to attend as an audience member! 

Sixteen participants will read for five minutes each. Through software created by Zoom, participants need only a reliable internet connection—or even just a phone line—in order to take part. 

This event is free and first-come, first-served. Any genre is welcome. 

The event takes place on the internet. Instructions for accessing the Online Open Mic will be sent to registrants no less than twenty-four hours prior to the start of class.

The North Carolina Writers' Network's first Online Open Mic was held in June. This event gathered writers from Brevard to Kill Devil Hills and many points in between. You can listen to the archived recording here.

If you don't want to read but would like to listen, we'll provide instructions closer to the event on how to be part of the audience.

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to all writers at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

 

WRIGHTSVILLE BEACH—Dan Albergotti, poet and professor at Coastal Carolina University, will lead the Master Class in Poetry, "The 'What It Is' and the Unteachable Lesson: On Form in Free Verse and the Search for Metaphor" at the North Carolina Writers' Network 2017 Fall Conference, November 3-5, at the Holiday Inn Resort in Wrightsville Beach.

Registration is now open.

In his Master Class, poets will take a close look at several poems that illustrate: (1) the truth that "free verse" is never truly free of form and (2) the god-like and elusive power of metaphor. And of course attendees will talk about the poems submitted by the participants as well.

To apply for this Master Class, please submit three poems, along with your current CV as a separate attachment, on the same day that you register for the conference. Poems should be saved in a single MS Word document, using single-spaced, 12-point, Times New Roman font, and sent as an attachment to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Your name and the title of each poem should appear on the submission, and your name in the file name of the document (i.e., ‘Plath_Poems.docx’). Accepted registrants will also be asked to circulate their drafts to others in the class prior to the conference.

Each registrant should be ready to handle the intensive instruction and atmosphere of the Master Class.

NCWN has been celebrating literary journals this year, so we asked Dan to tell us about his first publication.

"My first publication in a literary journal was a poem called 'Methuselah at the Gates,' which appeared in the South Carolina Review in the early 1990s," Dan said. "It's a journal published at Clemson University, where I'd completed my BA and MA degrees in English a few years before. Because of the connection, I felt a little bit like I'd cheated, even though I'd used the standard procedure to submit and hadn't sought out any favors. In any case, I was immensely proud to see my work in those pages. That is, of course, until time passed and I got a lot better.

"'Methuselah at the Gates' is a dramatic monologue spoken by the oldest man ever, trying to justify a life of 969 years that warrants little more than a sentence in the Bible. It's something like Robert Browning in a late twentieth-century style. I thought I was so devilishly clever back then. Now, I'd like to find every copy of that issue of South Carolina Review—pilfer them from university libraries, lift them from private collections—and have a grand bonfire. Years later, my MFA mentor at UNC-Greensboro, Stuart Dischell, cautioned his students, 'The only thing worse than not being published is being published.' Amen, Stuart.

"Publication of your work is a little bit like marriage. When you commit to doing it, it's best to be absolutely sure that you're not going to have regrets."

Dan Albergotti is the author of The Boatloads (BOA Editions, 2008) and Millennial Teeth (Southern Illinois University Press, 2014), as well as a limited-edition chapbook, The Use of the World (Unicorn Press, 2013). His poems have appeared in The Cincinnati Review, Five Points, The Southern Review, The Virginia Quarterly Review, and two editions of the Pushcart Prize, as well as other journals and anthologies. He is a professor of English at Coastal Carolina University.

Fall Conference attracts hundreds of writers from around the country and provides a weekend full of activities that include lunch and dinner banquets with readings, keynotes, tracks in several genres, open mic sessions, and the opportunity for one-on-one manuscript critiques with editors or agents. Other Master Classes will be led by Wendy Brenner (Creative Nonfiction) and Nina de Gramont (Fiction).

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to all writers, in all genres, at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

 

WRIGHTSVILLE BEACH—Beth Staples, editor of Lookout Books, will teach the session "Understanding the Editorial Process" at the North Carolina Writers' Network 2017 Fall Conference, November 3-5, at the Holiday Inn Resort in Wrightsville Beach.

Registration is now open.

Many writers feel uneasy at the very idea of having their work edited. Picture an editor, and you might think of an angry red pen, someone intent on finding mistakes. But Beth, Editor at Lookout Books and Senior Editor at Ecotone magazine, believes very strongly in a collaborative writer-editor relationship, one that can do wonderful things for a piece of writing. This class will aim to demystify the editorial process and give advice about the best way to receive edits and work with an editor. From smaller pieces at literary journals to book-length projects, Beth will give you a peek behind the editorial curtain, and explain the various stages of the editorial process, from acquisition to proofreading and everything in between.

NCWN has been celebrating literary journals this year, so we asked Beth to tell us about her first publication.

"My first acceptance from a literary magazine came while I was in the final year of MFA at Arizona State. I was working on a novel for my thesis about a woman who, on the weekends, threw on a colored polo and some khakis and pretended to work at big box stores—the Home Depot, mostly—as a way to fend off her overwhelming loneliness. The Portland Review accepted the first brief chapter, which was un-enchantingly titled “Something with a Name.” In that section: a love scene of sorts, in which the main character’s pet rabbit chokes and dies on a condom, a moment that actually made me sob while writing it, perhaps more in response to my own loneliness than the power of the scene. This novel is now, thankfully, in the drawer. But I was so grateful for the publication, which was perhaps the first time I felt like a real writer.

Beth Staples is editor for Lookout Books, the boutique literary press out of UNCW, and senior editor for Ecotone, its sister magazine. She edits prose, both fiction and nonfiction, and was recently the editor for the novel Honey from the Lion and the story collection We Show What We Have Learned. She is also the assistant director of the Publishing Laboratory and teaches classes at UNCW related to editing, publishing, and book design. She received her MFA in fiction writing from Arizona State University.

The University of North Carolina at Wilmington Department of Creative Writing will sponsor the Closing Reception of Writers' Week, which leads directly into the Opening Reception of NCWN's 2017 Fall Conference, on Friday, November 3, beginning at 6:00 pm.

Fall Conference attracts hundreds of writers from around the country and provides a weekend full of activities that include lunch and dinner banquets with readings, keynotes, tracks in several genres, open mic sessions, and the opportunity for one-on-one manuscript critiques with editors or agents. This year's Master Classes will be led by Dan Albergotti (Poetry); Wendy Brenner (Creative Nonfiction); and Nina de Gramont (Fiction).

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to all writers, in all genres, at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

 

 
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