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NC Literary Hall of Fame

 

 


Kristin FitzpatrickKristin Fitzpatrick of Alameda, California, is the winner of the 2011 Thomas Wolfe Fiction Prize for her short story, “Queen City Playhouse.”

Final judge Martin Clark, the acclaimed author of three best -selling and widely acclaimed novels,  said of her story, “Great story, amazing characters, excellent conceit, beautiful, moving ending, nice turns of phrase…”

Fitzpatrick holds an MFA from CSU Fresno. In 2009-2010 she was the writer-in-residence at The Seven Hills School in Cincinnati. Her fiction appears in Colorado Review and is forthcoming in The Southeast Review. She lives in the San Francisco Bay area, where she is at work on a novel.  Fitzpatrick will win $1.000 for her story, which will be considered for publication in The Thomas Wolfe Review, as will the stories named honorable mentions.

Clark, a graduate of Davidson College and the University of Virginia Law School who serves as a circuit court judge in Virginia when he is not writing novels,  named two honorable mentions. The first is Lisa Gornick of New York City for her story “Eleanor,” of which Clark said, “Simply put, a powerful story, well told.”  Gornick is a graduate of Princeton and holds a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Yale. She is a graduate of the writing program at N.Y.U. and serves on the faculty of the Creative Writing Program at Fordham. She is the author of a novel, A Private Sorcery (Algonquin), and her short stories have appeared in numerous journals.

The second honorable mention went to “Gone” by Barbara Modrack of Brighton, MI. Clark said, “…it took an important theme that’s been written to death and got it just right, made it fresh and compelling…”  Modrack is the editor of the Grand Ledge Independent and Delta-Waverly Community News, two weekly newspapers.  Her short stories have been  published in Seventeen, Sassy, and the Alaska Quarterly Review.

There were 140 stories entered in this year’s competition, the most in its history. Contest coordinator Tony Abbott sent 43 stories to preliminary judge David Radavich of Charlotte, who then forwarded 18 stories to Clark.   Among those 18, Radavich selected six finalists in addition to the three winners:   Cara Achterberg of New Freedom, PA, for “I’m Not Her”;  Jennifer Adams of Birchrunville, PA, for “Girl on a Balcony”; Virginia Hudson of Raleigh, NC, for “Silo”; Gary Powell of Cornelius, NC, for “Fast Trains”; Kirk Wilson of Austin, TX, for “The Coldest Day”; and Ward Brian Zimmerman of Boone, NC, for “The Heart of Darkness.”

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The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development. For additional information, visit http://www.ncwriters.org.

 

Randall KenanGREENSBORO, NC--The Network will host its annual Spring Conference at the campus of the University of North Carolina-Greensboro on April 28. Nonfiction writers can choose a full-day nonfiction workshop with Randall Kenan titled, "'What Did You Say?': Dialogue Matters in Nonfiction", or attend two half-day workshops: "A Nonfiction Story: From Idea to Book" with Justin Catanoso and "Writing the Natural World" with Paul Bogard.

Here are the course descriptions:

“What Did You Say?”: Dialogue Matters in Nonfiction (All-Day Nonfiction) with Randall Kenan
A tension has always existed between nonfiction (factual) writing and the siren call of fiction, where the writer can make the characters say whatever we like. How do we capture quality, telling speech from real people without crossing the line into “invention”? What is good dialogue? Dialogue is first and foremost about characterization. We will examine the concepts of subtext, “Amurican” English, of spelling and of phonetics. How does one develop a good ear? In workshop we will be closely reading brief samples from recognized masters of nonfiction writing—Joseph Mitchell, Joan Didion, John McPhee, and others. Participants are asked to bring a page or two from their work involving reported speech. Recommended reading: Up In the Old Hotel by Joseph Mitchell.

A Nonfiction Story: From Idea to Book with Justin Catanoso
In this session, journalist and author Justin Catanoso will take you through the process of producing a nonfiction book: developing the idea, working with an agent, obtaining a publisher, and doing the work necessary to write a 350-page manuscript in 15 months. In Catanoso’s case, the result was his first book, a family memoir published by HarperCollins in 2008. This interactive session will also share such documents as the book proposal, outlines, and note cards used to organize each section of each chapter, and examples of edited chapters.

Paul BogardWriting the Natural World with Paul Bogard
In this workshop we will explore writing about the natural world. No matter what genre you write most, a careful and colorful representation of the natural world can add life and credibility to your work. We will look at a few examples of nature writing and environmental writing, then try our hand at some of the techniques we've talked about. While our focus will be on creative nonfiction literature, writers of fiction and poetry can benefit as well from learning new ways of incorporating an attention to the natural world into their work.

Paul Bogard is the author of The Geography of Night: Discovering Darkness in an Age of Light (Little, Brown, 2013) and the editor of Let There Be Night: Testimony on Behalf of the Dark (2008). His essays have appeared in such places as Creative Nonfiction, River Teeth, Gettysburg Review, Audubon, and Outside. He teaches writing at Wake Forest University.

Justin CatanosoJustin Catanoso became senior lecturer and director of journalism at Wake Forest University in September 2011. He has had a thirty-year career as a professional journalist at newspapers in Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and North Carolina, including eleven years as a reporter with the Greensboro News & Record, where he received a Pulitzer Prize nomination in 1992 for his investigative reporting into fraud in the tobacco industry. He was founding executive editor of The Business Journal in the Triad, which started publishing in 1998. In 2008, HarperCollins published his first book, a family memoir titled My Cousin the Saint: A Search for Faith, Family, and Miracles, a Book of the Month Club selection, and a summer reading pick by the Order Sons of Italy in America.

Randall Kenan is the author of a novel, A Visitation of Spirits; two works of nonfiction, Walking on Water: Black American Lives at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century and The Fire This Time; a young adult biography of James Baldwin; and a collection of stories, Let the Dead Bury Their Dead, a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Recently he edited and wrote the introduction for The Cross of Redemption: The Uncollected Writings of James Baldwin. Among his awards are a Guggenheim Fellowship, the John Dos Passos Prize, a Whiting Writers Award, the North Carolina Award, and the American Academy of Arts and Letters’ Rome Prize. He is associate professor of English and Comparative Literature at UNC-Chapel Hill.

Full faculty bios can be viewed on the conference webpage. The 2012 Spring Conference also offers workshops in fiction, poetry, children's publishing, and tutorials for authors. Registration is available online or by calling 336-293-8844.

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development.

 

Janice Moore FullerGREENSBORO, NC--The Network will host its annual Spring Conference at the campus of the University of North Carolina-Greensboro on April 28. Poets can attend two half-day workshops: "The Persona Poem" with Janice Fuller and "Showing AND Telling" with Rebecca Black.

Here are the course descriptions:

The Persona Poem with Janice Moore Fuller
In his poem “Ars Poetica,” Czeslaw Milosz proclaims, “The purpose of poetry is to remind us / how difficult it is to remain just one person, / for our house is open, there are no keys in the doors, / and invisible guests come in and out at will.” This workshop will explore the reasons writers turn to persona poems and the creative value of this experience. The persona (or mask) poem is a first-person poem in which the poet assumes the voice of an object or person. The workshop will begin with a reading of some canonical and contemporary models of the persona poem in order to consider which qualities make the poems successful. The session will also include tips for how to invite “invisible guests” into our poems.

Showing AND Telling (poetry) with Rebecca Black
“Show, don't tell,” is the first rule of writing well—you've heard that often enough. However, good poems can arise from the right mixture of scenes, images, and striking moments when the writer speaks his or her mind with clarity and boldness. During this workshop, we’ll explore poems that delight in exploiting the delicate balance between showing and telling. As the session progresses, we’ll try drafting our own poems by imitating a few model poems by Louise Gluck, Elizabeth Bishop, Billy Collins, and other masters, using simple, timed writing exercises to generate new work. Students will leave with a sense of accomplishment, knowledge of some excellent model poems, and a new poem draft.

Janice Moore Fuller has published three poetry books—Archeology Is a Destructive Science, Sex Education, and Séance, winner of the Poetry Council of North Carolina’s Oscar Arnold Young Award (for North Carolina poetry book of the year). Her poems have appeared in numerous magazines and anthologies, and her plays and libretti have been produced at many festivals and theatres. A Fellow at artist colonies in Ireland, Scotland, Spain, and Portugal, she is Writer-in-Residence and Professor of English at Catawba College.

Rebecca BlackIn 2011,Rebecca Black was a Fulbright fellow at the Seamus Heaney Center for Poetry in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Her first book, Cottonlandia (2004), won a Juniper Prize. A former Wallace Stegner and National Endowment for the Arts fellow, she is an assistant professor at UNC- Greensboro; she and her family divide their time between San Francisco and North Carolina. She is at work on a second manuscript, Presidio.

Full faculty bios can be viewed on the conference webpage. The 2012 Spring Conference also offers workshops in nonfiction, poetry, children's publishing, and tutorials for authors. Registration is available online or by calling 336-293-8844.

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development.

 

Megan BryantGREENSBORO, NC--The Network will host its annual Spring Conference at the campus of the University of North Carolina-Greensboro on April 28. Authors interested in writing for children can attend a half-day workshop titled, "Breaking into Children's Publishing" with Megan Bryant; while writers hoping to sell a book and build a career can sign up for "Accounting for Writers" with Ted Shalek or "Guerilla Tactics: Promotional Strategies for the Cash-Strapped Author" with Charles Fiore.

Here are the course descriptions:

Breaking into Children’s Publishing with Megan Bryant
Children’s publishing is more competitive than ever before. In this workshop, you’ll gain an understanding of the current business climate that will provide a solid foundation for pitching and selling your manuscript in today’s especially competitive conditions. We’ll also discuss tips, tricks, and practical advice about writing for children.

Accounting for Writers with Ted Shalek
This workshop will cover the accounting basics that writers need to know: how royalties are taxed, what expenses can be deducted, what authors have to do to (legally) sell their books themselves, and the point at which a hobby becomes a business.

Guerilla Tactics: Promotional Strategies for the Cash-Strapped Author with Charles Fiore
Unless money’s no object, you’ve got to be ferocious when publicizing your book. And whether you’re a self-published author or you’ve gone the traditional route, nobody loves your book like you do, and no one is going to work harder, or be a better proponent, for your book than you. In this workshop, we’ll discuss low-cost strategies for being your own marketing and PR department—the same strategies used by professional PR agents and publishers that you can do for a fraction of the cost. We’ll discuss the dos and don’ts of author website design; how to mobilize the robots at Amazon.com to work for you; and develop successful tactics for getting media attention for your book and your events. You’ll leave this workshop energized and fully equipped to begin promoting your book—whether or not you’ve got the backing of a publisher’s marketing department.

Megan E. Bryant has written more than 190 children’s books (including a New York Times bestseller and two VOYA Nonfiction Honor Books) for several major publishers including Chronicle Books, Penguin, Simon and Schuster, Running Press, Scholastic, HarperCollins, and Disney. As a former children’s book editor, she has edited more than 325 children’s books in all genres.

Ted ShalekTed Shalek is the Chief Financial Officer of Smart Online, Inc., a software development company providing a unique mobile platform that allows creative writers to develop mobile applications without knowing computer codes. He is also a lecturer at UNCG in the inter-disciplinary entrepreneurship program. He teaches entrepreneurial finance to non-business students. Ted is a Certified Public Accountant and a Certified Valuation Analyst. He earned an MBA from The University of Tampa and a bachelor’s degree in accounting from John Carroll University in Cleveland, Ohio.

Charles FioreCharles Fiore is the communications coordinator for the North Carolina Writers’ Network. Previously, he served as a freelance public relations specialist and the public relations director/marketing coordinator for ACTA Publications, where he led publicity campaigns for bestselling authors Bill James, Gary Graf, and Paul Wilkes, among many others. Fiore is the author of the novel Green Gospel (Livingston Press, 2011). His website is www.lcfiore.com.

Full faculty bios can be viewed on the conference webpage. The 2012 Spring Conference also offers workshops in nonfiction, poetry, children's publishing, and tutorials for authors. Registration is available online or by calling 336-293-8844.

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development.

 

Spring Conference 2012 FacultyGREENSBORO, NC—Registration for the North Carolina Writers' Network 2012 Spring Conference has closed, but there will be on-site registration available beginning at 8:30 am on Saturday, April 28.

The North Carolina Writers’ Network 2012 Spring Conference will be held in the Elliott University Center at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.The annual event, co-sponsored by UNC-Greensboro’s creative writing program, draws writers from across North Carolina and beyond for workshops in fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, children’s writing, and publishing, led by distinguished writing faculty. This year’s conference will also feature a Publishers Panel with book and journal editors; a Faculty Reading; an Open Mike reading for conference attendees; and “Lunch with an Author,” where attendees share lunch and personal conversation with faculty members.

The keynote address will feature representatives from an exciting new web-based project titled “A Literary Map of North Carolina.” A collaborative project between UNC-Greensboro and the North Carolina Center for the Book, the NC Literary Map is a database-driven, searchable/browseable, multi-level, multi-media online research tool to foster interest in North Carolina’s rich literary tradition. Guests can search by author or genre, or just browse the map to find authors who have lived in or written about North Carolina. Scheduled to be officially launched in the fall, visitors can catch a sneak peak at www.library.uncg.edu/dp/nclitmap.

Course offerings at the 2012 Spring Conference include two all-day workshops, one on fiction led by Alan Michael Parker, and a nonfiction intensive led by Randall Kenan; a half-day fiction workshop with Mylène Dressler; and poetry workshops by Janice Fuller and Rebecca Black. Registrants can also attend “Breaking into Children’s Publishing” with Megan Bryant, classes in “Accounting for Writers” and “Guerrilla Tactics for Authors,” and creative nonfiction workshops led by Justin Catanoso and Paul Bogard.

 

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development.

 

Spring Conference 2012 FacultyGREENSBORO, NC—Registration for the North Carolina Writers' Network 2012 Spring Conference has closed, but there will be on-site registration available beginning at 8:30 am on Saturday, April 28.

The North Carolina Writers’ Network 2012 Spring Conference will be held in the Elliott University Center at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.The annual event, co-sponsored by UNC-Greensboro’s creative writing program, draws writers from across North Carolina and beyond for workshops in fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, children’s writing, and publishing, led by distinguished writing faculty. This year’s conference will also feature a Publishers Panel with book and journal editors; a Faculty Reading; an Open Mike reading for conference attendees; and “Lunch with an Author,” where attendees share lunch and personal conversation with faculty members.

The keynote address will feature representatives from an exciting new web-based project titled “A Literary Map of North Carolina.” A collaborative project between UNC-Greensboro and the North Carolina Center for the Book, the NC Literary Map is a database-driven, searchable/browseable, multi-level, multi-media online research tool to foster interest in North Carolina’s rich literary tradition. Guests can search by author or genre, or just browse the map to find authors who have lived in or written about North Carolina. Scheduled to be officially launched in the fall, visitors can catch a sneak peak at www.library.uncg.edu/dp/nclitmap.

Course offerings at the 2012 Spring Conference include two all-day workshops, one on fiction led by Alan Michael Parker, and a nonfiction intensive led by Randall Kenan; a half-day fiction workshop with Mylène Dressler; and poetry workshops by Janice Fuller and Rebecca Black. Registrants can also attend “Breaking into Children’s Publishing” with Megan Bryant, classes in “Accounting for Writers” and “Guerrilla Tactics for Authors,” and creative nonfiction workshops led by Justin Catanoso and Paul Bogard.

 

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development.

 

Hats Off! to Tom Davis, whose poem "Summer in the Smokies" was selected to appear on the posters for Winston-Salem Writers’ POETRY IN PLAIN SIGHT program for May 2013.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wings of the Wind: A Cornucopia of Poetry by Kym Gordon Moore

Outskirts Press
$14.95, paperback
ISBN: 978-1-478718758
March, 2013
Poetry
Available from your local bookstore or www.Amazon.com

Wings of the Wind: A Cornucopia of Poetry is an eclectic full-length collection of poems depicting experiences illustrated through diverse forms of self-expression. Kym Gordon Moore portrays versatility in rhymed and free verse poems that convey stories about people, places, nature, inspiration, cuisine, music, celebrations, epiphanies and inanimate objects. Included in her compilation is a metrical sample of a Pantoum, Limerick, Elegy, and Haiku.

Wings of the Wind: A Cornucopia of Poetry contains eighty-one carefully chosen poems that are significant to the foundation of this collection and easy for readers to identify with. Besieged by segmented poetic elements of flight, your journey through the pages of this book will be entertaining, educational, emotional, nostalgic, stimulating and edifying.

Kym Gordon Moore, who is also author of Diversities of Gifts: Same Spirit is an award-winning recipient in poetry contests such as the Edward Davin Vickers Memorial Award and Oneswan Productions Writing Competition. Her poems appeared in Writers Digest Magazine, Poets for Peace: A Collection, Reach of Song, Home for the Holidays, and The Blind Man’s Rainbow anthologies. She was selected as one of the contributing authors for Chicken Soup for the Soul: Thanks Mom.

Kym is the co-founder of“Favorite Things for a CAUSE (Creating Awareness by Understanding Setbacks through Edification), a not-for-profit charitable mission promoting hope, goodwill, and mentoring, by collaborating with community alliances. She was selected as one of the U.S. 2012 and 2013 National World Book Night Volunteers for North Carolina. As one of the three 2009 General Mills Feeding Dreams Community Champions for the Charlotte, North Carolina market, Kym was recognized for her volunteerism with the Dove’s Nest, a subsidiary of The Charlotte Rescue Mission. She is a member of the American Author’s Association, the North Carolina Writers' Network, Poetry Society of America, and the American Marketing Association. Kym holds a B.S. in Criminal Justice, an MBA with a concentration in marketing, certification as an email marketing specialist, and certification as a corporate spokesperson. She lives in North Carolina with her husband Sharward L. Moore, Sr.

Visit her website www.kymgmoore.com; her blogs http://frombehindthepen.wordpress.com/; http://www.teaandpoetrybookclub.blogspot.com/; and connect with the author through Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest and Google +.

 

Hats Off! to Malinda Dunlap Fillingim, whose short story "Preserves" has been accepted by Lunch Ticket, the literary magazine of Antioch University in Los Angeles.

 

Hats Off! to Anthony S. Abbott, winner of the Charles Shull Award for traditional poetry, sponsored by the Poetry Council of North Carolina.

 

Hats Off! to Daniel Nathan Terry, who finished as runner-up in the 2013 Oscar Arnold Young Award for NC’s best book of poetry for his collection, Waxwings

 

Hats Off! to Lenard D. Moore, recipient of this year's Bay Leaves dedication sponsored by the Poetry Council of North Carolina.

 

Hats Off! to Betty Dotson-Lewis, whose book Bluegrass Music: The Sunny Side of Appalachia, Bluegrass from the Grassroots, is being used in the North Carolina Bluegrass Mapping Project.

 

Hats Off! to Tony Wayne Brown of Greenville, who has had several publications this year, including "Corrective Action," which just appeared in Perpetual Motion Machine's Kurt Vonnegut tribute print anthology; "Poor Mama," currently online at Birmingham Arts Journal; and online in January, "A Fairy Tale Ending," in Writers Haven, "Authority Figure" in The Dying Goose, and "Eating Out" in Inffective Ink.

 

Hats Off! to Susan M. Steadman, whose short play "The Thing with Feathers" will be published in the inaugural issue of the online South Florida Arts Journal. In addition, the play has been chosen for development and presentation at the Association for Theatre in Higher Education conference this summer.

 

Hats Off! E.T. Malone, Jr., whose article "Remembering Malcolm Fowler" was published in North Carolina Folklore Journal, Vol. 59, No. 1 (Spring-Summer 2012), pp. 4-10.

 

Hats Off! to Rebecca McClanahan, whose tenth book, The Tribal Knot: A Memoir of Family, Community, and a Century of Change, has just been published by Indiana University Press. She also has three new essays in The Sun, Brevity, and Soundings.

 

Hats Off! to Bob Mustin, whose memoir piece "The Man IN The Moon" appears in Ray's Road Review - Spring 2013 Issue.

 

Hats Off! to Susan Steadman, whose ten-minute play "Much, Much Later" will appear in an anthology to be published by YOUTHPlays.

 

Hats Off! to Charlene Pollano, whose short story "Angle of Repose" appears in Prime Number Magazine: A Journal of Distinctive Poetry and Prose, Issue 31.

 

Hats Off! to Shari Berk, one of the Eastern Division winners of the Gilbert Chappell Distinguished Poet Contest sponsored by the North Carolina Poetry Society. All four winners will read at the at Herman Parks and Rec Center April 3 in Goldsboro, 7 pm.

 

Hats Off! to Jim Collins, whose short story "The Road Back" appears in Prick of the Spindle Issue 3, Fall, 2012.

 

Hats Off! to Katherine Van Dis, whose short story "Our Lady of Sorrows" was the recipient of the Spring 2013 Orlando Prize for Short Fiction. This contest is sponsored by the A Room of Her Own Foundation and winners will be published in the Los Angeles Review.

 

Hats Off! to Kym Gordon Moore who just released her latest book Wings of the Wind: A Cornucopia of Poetry, which contains eighty-one carefully chosen poems in this full-length collection.

 

Hats Off! to Nathan Ross Freeman, whose teen group, Authoring Action, will travel to Harvard University this weekend to engage and share their writing process with the Graduate School of Education. There will be a simple round table Q&A forum from the HGSE students to the young authors on their pieces, their opinions, their thoughts on the current state of education, etc. Finally, Authoring Action will put on a workshop for how future educators can use creative writing to critically engage youth.

 

Hats Off! to Rita Berman, whose book Still Hopping, Still Hoping, a biography of Carla Shuford, has been picked up and re-published by Righter Publishing Company and now includes Carla's stories and poems.

 

Hats Off! to Margaret A. Harrell. Rain Taxi Review of Books has reviewed her memoir, Keep This Quiet!, concluding that "Three men, embodiments of three different dimensions of the late 1960’s Zeitgeist—wispy dissolution, language-charged intellect, and Gonzo persona-building—are brought together by Harrell to invoke a world of passion and commitment, the world she had always hoped she would inhabit. Keep This Quiet! is at once noisy, sensual, and word-drunk, as well as quietly intimate and full of Harrell’s wonder at her luck. While most readers will come to this book for the Thompson content, in truth all the portraits here—all four of them—are compelling and often touching."

 

Hats Off! to Margaret Harrell, whose memoir, Keep This Quiet! My Relationship with Hunter S. Thompson, Milton Klonsky, and Jan Mensaert , has a two-page spread in the new issue of the quarterly UK literary magazine Beat Scene. Keep This Quiet! is also featured in the special issue of Literary Journalism Studies (Spring) to mark the 40th anniversary of Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. And "Review: Keep This Quiet - Margaret Harrell" is still on the front page of the highly thought of Hunter Thompson blog, www.totallygonzo.org.

. . . to Lou Lipsitz of Chapel Hill, who has been awarded the 2010 Blue Lynx Prize for his poetry collection, If This World Falls Apart, his fourth full-length book of poems.  The prize carries a $2,000 cash award, and publication by Lynx House Press, a Spokane based independent literary publisher that began sponsoring this national manuscript competition in 1996.  The book will be released in April 2011, and copies can be ordered from www.lynxhousepress.org.  Final judge for this year’s competition was Christopher Buckley.  Previous judges include Yusef Komunyakaa, David Wojahn, Robert Wrigley, Beckian Fritz Goldberg, Dara Wier, and Dorianne Laux.  The prize is given to a U.S. poet, regardless of publication history, for a full-length book manuscript of poems.

... to Ned Condini.  He has been awarded the WBYeats Poetry Society Award (first prize).  On April 4th,  his poetry was read at Barnes and Noble, Union Square, New York.

..... to Karen Paul Holmes. She had four poems in the April 2011 issue of Dead Mule School of Southern Literature published.  She also had a poem featured on Your Daily Poem on April 10, 2011.

.... to NC Writers' Network board member and 2010 North Carolina Piedmont Laureate, Zelda Lockhart.  Lockhart is a
finalist for a 2011 Lambda Literary Award.

 

Maureen Sherbondy’s poetry recently appeared in two anthologies, Mamas and Papas: On the Sublime and Heartbreaking Art of Parenting (City Works Press), and The Sound of Poets Cooking (Jacar Press).

. . . to Julie Davis, whose short story, "Taylor's Creek," was one of the finalists for the Doris Betts Fiction Prize and has just been published in the spring 2010 issue of the online magazine IBX Lifestyles, which is dedicated to the lifestyles of North Carolina's Inner Banks. See http://www.ibxlifestyles.com/page.php?25.

Lyn Hawk's  latest book for English teachers, Teaching Julius Caesar: A Differentiated Approach, was just released by the National Council of Teachers of English.

http://www1.ncte.org/store/books/shakespeare/131418.htm

. . . to Eleanor Ross Taylor, who won the Poetry Foundation's $100,000 Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize, presented annually "to a living U.S. poet whose lifetime accomplishments warrant extraordinary recognition." Taylor will be honored at the Pegasus Awards ceremony in Chicago May 18.

"We live in a time when poetic styles seem to become more antic and frantic by the day, and Taylor's voice has been muted from the start. Muted, not quiet," said Christian Wiman, editor of Poetry magazine. "You can't read these poems without feeling the pent-up energy in them, the focused, even frustrated compression, and then the occasional clear lyric fury. And yet you can't read them without feeling, as well, a bracing sense of spiritual largesse and some great inner liberty."

Karen Holmes. just had a poem accepted by the Sow's Ear Poetry Review.

Hats off to Rupert W. Nacoste on Plainview Press publication of his memoir, Making Gumbo in the University.  Learn more at
www.makinggumbo.com.

 .......... to Sandra Adams. Her poem written by NCWN member Sandra Ervin Adams, "Reminder,"recently won Second Place in The Lyricist Statewide Competition for 2009. Her work appeared in that
literary journal in 2006, 2007, and 2008, but this is her first time to win a prize
in the contest. Sandra lives in Jacksonville.
 



 
. . .whose new book Family Bible, (University of Iowa Press) was just released this month.  Poets & Writers Magazine is running an interview with her in the upcoming May/June issue in their "Firsts" feature.  The Durham newspaper is running a review on April 20.
 
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