White Cross School Blog

 

NC Literary Hall of Fame

 

 

 

Friday-Sunday
November 4-6
Raleigh Marriott Crabtree Valley
4500 Marriott Dr.
Raleigh, NC 27612
919-781-7000

 

When booking your hotel reservation, use this link to reserve your room online or call the hotel at 919-781-7000 to make reservations at the discounted group rate.

 

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-Registration is now closed. Register on-site beginning Friday, November 4.**

 

FEES AND DEADLINES | COMPLETE SCHEDULE-AT-A-GLANCE | COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

SESSION I | SESSION II | SESSION III | SESSION IV | SESSION V | MASTER CLASSES | CRITIQUE SERVICE | MANUSCRIPT MART | FACULTY BIOGRAPHIES

 

Fees & Deadlines

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-Registration is now closed. Register on-site beginning Friday, November 4.**

 

Early registration: On-site registration:

Member Rates

  • $260 (full conference, with meals)
  • $200 (full conference, without meals)
  • $200 (full conference, without workshops)*
  • $210 (Saturday only, with meals)
  • $100 (Sunday only, without meals)

Nonmember Rates

  • $375 (full conference, with meals)
  • $300 (full conference, without meals)
  • $325 (Saturday only, with meals)
  • $200 (Sunday only, without meals)

Other Fees

  • $30 for a Master Class
  • $160 for Manuscript Mart
  • $150 for Critique Service
  • $150 for Marketing Mart

 

  • $450 (full conference, without meals—for members and nonmembers)
  • $350 (Saturday only, without meals—for members and nonmembers)
  • $250 (Sunday only, without meals—for members and nonmembers)

*This is our new “Hangout” rate, for NCWN members who want to come hang out with their friends, enjoy the group meals and general sessions, but not take any workshops.

 

Scholarships

Limited scholarship aid is available for the Fall Conference. To apply, send your current CV and a statement of writing intent—describing your background and goals as a writer—to Ed Southern at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

In addition, the Mary Belle Campbell Scholarships are open to applications from poets who teach full-time. For more information, please e-mail Ed Southern at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

One full Fall Conference scholarship sponsored by Marc Graham, author of Of Ashes and Dust.

The deadline for all scholarship applications is October 14.

 

Cancellations and Refunds

Cancellations must be made in writing and arrive at the Network by 4:00 pm on Friday, October 28, 2016, for you to receive a refund of the registration fee, less 25 percent. No-shows or cancellations after October 28 are nonrefundable.

Manuscript Mart, Critique Service, and Master Class fees are not refundable if you cancel. However, if we are not able to find a place for you in the Manuscript Mart, Critique Service, or Marketing Mart, we will return your check(s) for related extra charge(s).

Master Class application fees are nonrefundable.

Send all refund requests to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Deadlines

 

October 14

Deadline to reserve hotel rooms at low conference rate*
($127 + taxes and fees/night); please click here or call 919-781-7000 to make reservations at the discounted group rate) ++

* Conference-rate rooms subject to limited availability, and will be allocated on first-come, first-served basis.

October 14 Deadline for all scholarship applications (Fees & Deadlines)
October 21 Deadline for Master Class registration (see guidelines)
October 21 Deadline for Manuscript Mart / Critique Service registration (see guidelines)
October 28 Deadline for early registration (5:00 pm by phone or mail; midnight if registering online). The first 12 Fall Conference registrants to mention this sentence at the registration table will receive $20 off their next year’s NCWN member dues.
November 4-6 On-site registration available at conference
November 4-6 Fall Conference in session

 

For Writers with Special Needs

The North Carolina Writers' Network strives to make our programs and services accessible to all writers, including those with special needs. If you require conference materials either in large print or in Braille, or if you require a sign-language interpreter, please register for the conference and submit your request to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. no later than October 14. If you require any other special assistance, please let us know as soon as possible at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. We will do our best to accommodate all reasonable requests.

 

e-Packets

In an effort to save money, time, and resources, the Network will send to all 2016 Fall Conference registrants, exhibitors, and faculty an e-Packet, prior to November 4. The e-Packet will contain all the usual conference packet materials, in the form of a PDF that registrants can print or download to bring with them to the conference.

Name tags, personalized schedules, and copies of the Schedule-at-a-Glance will still be available at the registration table the day of the conference.

If you prefer to receive a traditional printed packet at the conference, please indicate this preference in the space provided on your registration form.

 

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Complete Schedule-At-A-Glance

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-Registration is now closed. Register on-site beginning Friday, November 4.**

 

Friday, November 4

3:00 – 10:00 pm...........Registration and Book Sales open
5:00 - 9:00 pm..............Exhibitor Tables Open
7:00 – 8:00 pm.............Opening Reception (Sponsored by Alice Osborn: Editor/Book Coach/Author)
8:00 – 9:00 pm.............Keynote Address by Margaret Maron
9:00 – 10:00 pm...........Book Signing (Sponsored by The 2017 Piedmont Laureate Program)

 

Saturday, November 5

7:30 – 9:00 am............Continental Breakfast available
7:30 am – 7:30 pm......Registration Table open
8:00 am - 7:30 pm.......Book Sales and Exhibitor Tables open
8:00 – 9:00 am............All Stories Connect Panel Discussion: "A Conversation about Culture" with Shervon Cassim, Sheila Smith McKoy, Donna Miscolta, and Elaine Neil Orr

9:00 am – 10:30 am......Session I

"Minute Particulars" (fiction) with Kim Church
"Image & Narrative" (poetry) with Joseph Millar **Closed**
"How to be a Rock Star at PR" with Alice Osborn
"The Art of Memory: Creative Nonfiction Master Class" with Haven Kimmel**Closed**
"The Power of Subtext in Fiction: Fiction Master Class" with Angela Davis-Gardner**Closed**
"At Work with the Masters: Poetry Master Class" with Dorianne Laux**Closed**
Manuscript Mart/Critique Service*

10:30 – 11:00 am...........Break
11:00 am – 12:30 pm.....Session II

"Panel Discussion: Freelance Writing 101" with Triangle Area Freelancers Mark Cantrell, Christa Gala, Corbie Hill, and Donald Vaughan
"The Contemporary Haiku" with Lenard D. Moore**Closed**
"Copyright Infringement" with Mitchell Tuchman
"The Art of Memory: Creative Nonfiction Master Class" with Haven Kimmel (Cont.)**Closed**
"The Power of Subtext in Fiction: Fiction Master Class" with Angela Davis-Gardner**Closed**(Cont.)
"At Work with the Masters: Poetry Master Class" with Dorianne Laux (Cont.)**Closed**
Manuscript Mart/Critique Service*

12:30 – 1:30 pm.........Luncheon featuring panel discussion on food writing with Debbie Moose, Bridgette A. Lacy, John Shelton Reed (Sponsored by UNC Press)

1:45 – 2:15 pm...........Network Town Hall Meeting
2:15 – 2:30 pm...........Break
2:30 pm – 4:00 pm.....Session III

"Ending Well: Short Story Endings and Their Lessons" with Clare Beams
"Grammar Gone Wild" with Ross White**Closed**
"How to Work with an Agent" with Kim Church and Emma Patterson
"The Art of Memory: Creative Nonfiction Master Class" with Haven Kimmel (Cont.)**Closed**
"The Power of Subtext in Fiction: Fiction Master Class" with Angela Davis-Gardner**Closed** (Cont.)
"At Work with the Masters: Poetry Master Class" with Dorianne Laux (Cont.)**Closed**
Manuscript Mart/Critique Service*

4:00 – 4:30 pm......Break
4:30 – 5:30 pm......Faculty Readings

6:00 – 7:00 pm......Happy Hour

7:00 – 8:00 pm......Network Banquet featuring North Carolina Poet Laureate Shelby Stephenson
8:00 – 8:30 pm......Book Signing
8:30 – 9:00 pm....Open Mic Readings (Sign up at registration table) (Sponsored by Al Manning)

 

Sunday, November 6

7:30 – 9:00 am.............Continental Breakfast available
7:30 am – 1:00 pm.......Registration Table open
8:00 – 1:00 pm.............Book Sales and Exhibitor Tables open
8:00 – 9:00 am.............Brilliant at Breakfast Panel Discussion: "Agents and Editors" with Michelle Brower, Robin Miura, Emma Patterson, and Kathy Pories

9:00 am – 10:30 am.......Session IV

"The Problem of Plot" (creative nonfiction) with Brook Wilensky-Lanford
"The Furniture of the Poem" with Chris Tonelli
"Developing Authentic Dialog" with Howard L. Craft
"YA/NA: What’s the Big Deal?" with Jen McConnel
"Marketing Tips & Principles for Book Promotion" with Linda Rohrbough
Manuscript Mart/Critique Service*

10:30 – 11:00 am............Break
11:00 am – 12:30 pm......Session V

"Crazy Characters and How to Excavate the Troubled Mind" with Barbara Claypole White
"The Relationship Museum" with Zelda Lockhart**Closed**
"Don’t Pull the Plug . . . " with Eleanora E. Tate
"Sharp, Succinct & Suspenseful: Crafting the Mystery Story" with Art Taylor
"Beyond Vanity: How Indie Publishing Builds Pro Writers" with Ian J. Malone
Manuscript Mart/Critique Service*

12:30 – 1:00 pm.............Closing Conversation

 

*by prior registration only

 

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Course Descriptions

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-Registration is now closed. Register on-site beginning Friday, November 4.**

 

Saturday, November 5

8:00–9:00 am

All Stories Connect panel discussion: A Conversation about Culture with Shervon Cassim, Donna Miscolta, Elaine Neil Orr, and Sheila Smith McKoy
How do writers respond—responsibly and respectfully—to the pluralistic, polyvocal world we live in? How do writers recognize and reflect people and cultures other than their own, without exploiting or appropriating them? This panel discussion will be an honest and open discussion—neither prescriptive nor proscriptive, assuming goodwill on the part of all participants—about the challenges and opportunities that contemporary writers face.

9:00 – 10:30 am: Session I

Minute Particulars: The Infinite Possibility in a Single Moment (fiction) with Kim Church
William Blake wrote that “he who wishes to see a Vision, a perfect Whole / Must see it in its Minute Particulars.” So it is with making literature. Stories and novels are built of scenes; scenes are built of moments. Breaking an experience down into small units of time is a way of adding structure and emotional depth to writing; it can also make the composition of a story or a longer work less daunting. In this workshop we will look at experiences that occur within small, contained units of time and how these small moments can energize and shape our writing.

Image & Narrative (poetry) with Joseph Millar**Closed**
This class will examine the ways in which the image and the narrative operate in a well made poem, the ways by which the image can not only highlight the narrative, but also broaden and deepen its content and associations. We will talk about the history of the image in English letters and look at various model poems by such writers as Ruth Stone, Gary Soto, and Lynn Emanuel. Then, we will each write an imagistic draft of our own and share some of these, if there’s time.

How to be a Rock Star at PR with Alice Osborn
Hemingway, Whitman, and Morrison. These notable authors created their own brand by tooting their own horn and you can too. If you don’t stand out in the crowd in this new publishing world, you’ll be a “one and done” author. A decade ago Alice Osborn started her own successful writing and editing services company from the ground up and is here to share her secrets and hacks with you. In this talk you’ll learn how to build your brand by doing what no one else does and by learning and identifying your strengths as an author. You’ll also learn how to self-promote and enhance the presentation of your own skills, even if you’re a die-hard introvert. This workshop is useful for all writers across all genres and publication achievements.

The Art of Memory: Creative Nonfiction Master Class with Haven Kimmel**Closed**
In this class we'll explore voice, the art of memory, fact-based memoir, and ways to structure creative non-fiction. We'll help each other figure out ways to get projects off the ground, as well as advice about seeing it through to the end.

Please submit up to 1,500 words from a single work, along with your current CV, when you register for the Fall Conference, and no later than October 21. Submissions should be saved in a single MS Word document, using double-spaced, 12-point, Times New Roman font, with numbered pages, and sent as an attachment to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The title and your name should appear on the submission. Accepted registrants will also be asked to circulate their drafts to others in the class prior to the conference.

Each registrant should be ready to handle the intensive instruction and atmosphere of the Master Class.

The Power of Subtext in Fiction: Fiction Master Class with Angela Davis-Gardner**Closed**
In fiction, as in life, people rarely express their most intimate feelings. The emotions that lie beneath the surface of conflict in a narrative are sources of great tension in a story. In this workshop, we’ll read excerpts from published work as well as your own manuscripts and write prompts to explore the power of subtext. The techniques of writing subtext include the use of particular details in setting, characters’ body language and gestures, dialogue (what’s not said), and silences.

Please submit up to 1,500 words from a single work, along with your current CV, when you register for the Fall Conference, and no later than October 21. Submissions should be saved in a single MS Word document, using double-spaced, 12-point, Times New Roman font, with numbered pages, and sent as an attachment to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The title and your name should appear on the submission. Accepted registrants will also be asked to circulate their drafts to others in the class prior to the conference.

Each registrant should be ready to handle the intensive instruction and atmosphere of the Master Class.

At Work with the Masters: Poetry Master Class with Dorianne Laux**Closed**
We'll look at the work of three women poets, Ruth Stone, Lynn Emmanuel, Lucille Clifton, to see how they craft a poem. Then we'll try our hand at imitations. In this generative workshop with model poems, registrants will learn about a good number of craft techniques and strategies which can be of further use in the making of poems. The poems generated will be read to the group, and all will participate in giving helpful suggestions on what's working, what's not, and where to go next.

Please submit three poems, along with your current CV, when you register for the Fall Conference, and no later than October 21. Poems should be saved in a single MS Word document, using single-spaced, 12-point, Times New Roman font, and sent as an attachment to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Your name and the title of each poem should appear on the submission. Accepted registrants will also be asked to circulate their drafts to others in the class prior to the conference.

Each registrant should be ready to handle the intensive instruction and atmosphere of the Master Class.

 

11:00 am – 12:30 pm: Session II

Panel Discussion: Freelance Writing 101 with Triangle Area Freelancers Mark Cantrell, Christa Gala, Corbie Hill, and Donald Vaughan
This ninety-minute panel discussion will provide a detailed introduction to nonfiction freelance writing, including topics such as how to break in as a freelancer, general vs. niche freelancing, national vs. regional freelancing, finding and developing marketable ideas, maintaining momentum, working with editors, and the additional opportunities available to established freelance writers.

The Contemporary Haiku with Lenard D. Moore**Closed**
What is the contemporary structure of English Language Haiku? How does it differ from traditional English Language Haiku? What makes an excellent haiku? In this haiku-writing workshop, we will explore the haiku form and examine what makes a memorable haiku. We will also explore why this poetic form is employed globally. We will read, discuss, and write haiku as well as explore literary elements that help create the contemporary haiku.

Copyright Infringement with Mitchell Tuchman
Copyright ownership conveys exclusive rights on authors. These include rights to reproduce literary and other works in copies (hence the term “copy right”), to distribute and display those copies, to perform the protected works and to create derivative works. Authors may exercise these rights or license others to do so. Exercise of any of these rights without the author’s consent constitutes infringement in most cases. This session examines best—and worst—practices in the attempted enforcement of copyrights against infringers.

Creative Nonfiction Master Class with Haven Kimmel **Closed**
Cont. See Above.

Fiction Master Class with Angela Davis-Gardner**Closed**
Cont. See Above.

Poetry Master Class with Dorianne Laux**Closed**
Cont. See Above.

 

12:30 – 1:30 pm

Luncheon featuring a panel discussion on Food Writing with Debbie Moose, Bridgette A. Lacy, John Shelton Reed
Food writing is much, much more than recording recipes. The best food writing explores history, culture, even economics, and tells readers a great deal about the world we live in. In this panel, three of North Carolina's most accomplished food writers (each the author of a volume in UNC Press's Savor the South series) will discuss how to write well about eating well. Sponsored by UNC Press

 

2:30 – 4:00 pm: Session III

Ending Well: Short Story Endings and Their Lessons with Clare Beams
Flannery O'Connor contended that the key to a short story’s success is “an action or a gesture which was both totally right and totally unexpected; it would have to be one that was both in character and beyond character; it would have to suggest both the world and eternity.” Because the weight of these demands often falls on a story’s ending, discovering the right way to end is among the most difficult of a fiction writer’s tasks. Through reading and discussion of brief published pieces, and using a short exercise or two, we’ll explore some of the hallmarks of the great short-story ending: that combination of surprise and inevitability that feels final but never, ever neat. Please bring the last page of a draft of a story you’ve written; you’ll be examining this page with fresh eyes to discover how your ending is working, how it could work even better, and how the flaws in your ending can help you recognize earlier flaws in your story and understand how to address them.

Grammar Gone Wild with Ross White**Closed**
Are your stories existentially static? Are your poems lying flat on the line? Even though you know your subject matter is fantastic, sometimes you need a kick-start at the sentence level, a surgical strike on the syntax. In this workshop, we'll work through a series of exercises that will ask you to bend, twist, tie in knots, and finally break the rules of grammar to explore the kinetic energy inherent in your poetry and prose.

How to Work with an Agent with Kim Church and Emma Patterson
What you’ve heard is true: the author-agent relationship is a sort of marriage—and like any good marriage, it needs care and feeding. In this workshop, we’ll discuss finding the right agent, knowing what to expect (and not expect), and how to make the relationship a stronghold amid the slings and arrows of the ever-changing business of publishing.

Creative Nonfiction Master Class with Haven Kimmel **Closed**
Cont. See Above.

Fiction Master Class with Angela Davis-Gardner**Closed**
Cont. See Above.

Poetry Master Class with Dorianne Laux**Closed**
Cont. See Above.

 

Sunday, November 6

8:00–9:00 am

Brilliant at Breakfast Panel Discussion: Agents & Editors with Michelle Brower, Robin Miura, Emma Patterson, and Kathy Pories

9:00 – 10:30 am: Session IV

The Problem of Plot (creative nonfiction) with Brook Wilensky-Lanford
Too often, those of us who tell true stories neglect the element of "plot" that fiction writers know so well. After all, don't the plot points of a nonfiction story already exist? Actually, the "shape" of your story is a powerful tool to reach readers, and more of it is in our control as nonfiction writers than we realize. In Cold Blood starts at the end; John McPhee's essays often work in circles. In this class, we will explore a variety of classic plotlines from the classic five-act to the experimental "clothesline", play with the effects of changing the order, emphasis, and structure of our stories; and learn how to "reverse outline" working drafts to draw out their larger shape. Writers working at all levels in any genre of creative nonfiction, be it memoir, reportage, history, or anything else, are welcome.

The Furniture of the Poem: The Space of the Page and How We Fill It with Chris Tonelli
Poets, by nature, are obsessive. While this serves us well during the invention phase of writing--we tend to gather and become attached to plenty of interesting material--it can lead to a kind of hoarding. And like in a physical space, we are typically very good at justifying each saved thing's existence and navigating through the clutter they create. Unfortunately, our readers are probably not, nor should we expect them to be. This workshop will be focused on identifying the essential and non-essential elements of a poem and their optimal arrangement, both syntactically and formally. Each participant should send in advance of the workshop three unpublished poems, as a single PDF or Word attachment, to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., and bring at least twenty copies of each poem to the workshop. In addition to providing material for discussion, these poems will be considered for publication in So & So Magazine.

Developing Authentic Dialog with Howard L. Craft
Writing characters with authentic dialog enables us to burrow into painful family stories, the angst associated with growing up, a volatile relationship with a parent, lives fractured by substance abuse or divorce, and loss without being didactic or one dimensional. Exposition has its place but when you can put the grist of the story into the mouths of your characters you draw readers in and gives them a front-row seat in the life of your tale. Writers will be given scenarios to explore and develop.

Young Adult/New Adult: What’s the Big Deal with Jen McConnel
YA and NA are thriving genres. But what, exactly, is the difference? We'll discuss what separates YA from NA, explore the areas where they are closely related, and practice writing both.

Marketing Tips and Principles for Book Promotion in Today’s World with Linda Rohrbough
Most writers, self-published or not, know marketing and promotion isn’t just for the publisher anymore. It’s a survival tactic for any writer who wants to thrive in today’s electronic world. This workshop by award-winning author Linda Rohrbough will give you the latest techniques for how to create and execute a workable marketing plan, even if you have limited resources. You’ll learn the three biggest mistakes all writers make, marketing principles that always work (especially in social media), how to eliminate resistance, where to find marketing opportunities and how to make the most of them once you have them. Come hear Linda deliver the goods for what works in today’s world in a fun, practical, no-nonsense way.

 

11:00 am – 12:30 pm: Session V

Crazy Characters and How to Excavate the Troubled Mind with Barbara Claypole White
Many of my lead characters battle invisible disabilities: mental illness, neurological disorders, or extreme emotions such as grief. During this workshop, I will discuss the techniques I use to research and flesh out these complex characters—some of whom might call themselves crazy—in believable ways. We will also flex our collective writing muscles with exercises that can be applied to any troubled character. Bring your work-in-progress or just your imagination.

The Relationship Museum with Zelda Lockhart**Closed**
In this workshop participants produce raw material from the core of their experiences. Using Lockhart’s Relationship Museum writing exercise participants will quickly get into the creative zone and produce short poetry and prose rich in character/voice development and setting development. No previous writing experience is necessary. Participants will produce a short first draft of prose or small group of poems and walk away with an individualized writing tool that provides weeks of daily writing prompts that bring depth to character development and setting.

Don’t Pull the Plug on Your Character’s Life Support (children's fiction) with Eleanora E. Tate
In this workshop for writers primarily of middle grade fiction, Eleanora will offer attendees techniques to use to help resuscitate dreary, boring, ailing, languishing characters. During her years of critiquing manuscripts for the North Carolina Writers’ Network and other writing organizations and institutions, she's read hundreds of aspiring writers ’ manuscripts. Though the plots were feasible, the conflict worthy, the setting admirable, and the point of view workable, the main character (and thus the writer) was unable to carry the story forward to resolution because that character was too weak, uninteresting, or just downright pitiful. Attendees should be prepared to discuss problems they're having with their main character by bringing a one-page excerpt /scene with their character in action. Eleanora will also share insights about some other literary weaknesses she's found over the years and how to try to remedy them.

Sharp, Succinct & Suspenseful: Crafting the Mystery Story with Art Taylor
What makes a mystery? How do you build suspense? Where can I sell my crime story? Award-winning mystery writer Art Taylor will offer tips for writing and marketing short mystery stories. From detective fiction to domestic suspense to hard-hitting noir, various subgenres of the mystery offer different challenges for building on tradition and meeting reader expectations. This workshop will examine some specific passages from published crime fiction and look at how they keep aspects of the story in balance: strong prose as much as a fast-paced plot, compelling characters as much as a cleverly solved crime. A discussion of the ever-evolving market for mystery stories will conclude the session.

Beyond Vanity: How Indie Publishing Builds Professional Writers with Ian J. Malone
Independent Publishing can be the gateway to total liberation for a writer’s career. Just ask Andy Weir, author of a little book called The Martian. It can also see hours of work and dedication go completely unrewarded. While there is no clear-cut path to the former, it is easier for an author to get published today than ever before…and miracles do happen. This class will teach aspiring authors how to navigate the publishing process and take their book to market, while teaching them the skills they need to write and effectively market their books. Both of these are skills that agents look for, bringing a traditional publishing deal that much closer to reality. And who knows? Maybe you sign a multi-million-dollar movie deal along the way.

 

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Master Classes

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-Registration is now closed. Register on-site beginning Friday, November 4.**

 

Master Classes offer intermediate and advanced writers a chance to delve more deeply into a particular genre. Each Master Class will take place over the course of Sessions I, II, and III, and will be limited to the first fourteen qualified registrants.

While publication credits are not required, Master Class participants should be experienced writers, dedicated to their craft. Applications will be reviewed, and qualified registrants admitted, on a rolling basis, until the deadline of Friday, October 21.

When you register for a Master Class, please choose another class as a back-up in case you are not admitted to the Master Class.

Please submit your current CV, along with the required manuscript (see each Master Class’s course description, below, for its manuscript requirements), to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., no later than 4 pm, Friday, October 21.

Application to a Master Class requires a non-refundable $30 processing fee, in addition to the Fall Conference registration fee. If registering for the conference online or by phone, you can pay this processing fee with a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover. If registering by mail, you must include a separate check for $30.

MASTER CLASS REGISTRATIONS (INCLUDING REQUIRED MANUSCRIPTS) MUST BE RECEIVED BY 4:00 PM, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21.

The Art of Memory: Creative Nonfiction Master Class with Haven Kimmel**Closed**
In this class we'll explore voice, the art of memory, fact-based memoir, and ways to structure creative non-fiction. We'll help each other figure out ways to get projects off the ground, as well as advice about seeing it through to the end.

Please submit up to 1,500 words from a single work, along with your current CV, when you register for the Fall Conference, and no later than October 21. Submissions should be saved in a single MS Word document, using double-spaced, 12-point, Times New Roman font, with numbered pages, and sent as an attachment to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The title and your name should appear on the submission. Accepted registrants will also be asked to circulate their drafts to others in the class prior to the conference.

Each registrant should be ready to handle the intensive instruction and atmosphere of the Master Class.

The Power of Subtext in Fiction: Fiction Master Class with Angela Davis-Gardner**Closed**
In fiction, as in life, people rarely express their most intimate feelings. The emotions that lie beneath the surface of conflict in a narrative are sources of great tension in a story. In this workshop, we’ll read excerpts from published work as well as your own manuscripts and write prompts to explore the power of subtext. The techniques of writing subtext include the use of particular details in setting, characters’ body language and gestures, dialogue (what’s not said), and silences.

Please submit up to 1,500 words from a single work, along with your current CV, when you register for the Fall Conference, and no later than October 21. Submissions should be saved in a single MS Word document, using double-spaced, 12-point, Times New Roman font, with numbered pages, and sent as an attachment to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The title and your name should appear on the submission. Accepted registrants will also be asked to circulate their drafts to others in the class prior to the conference.

Each registrant should be ready to handle the intensive instruction and atmosphere of the Master Class.

At Work with the Masters: Poetry Master Class with Dorianne Laux**Closed**
We'll look at the work of three women poets, Ruth Stone, Lynn Emmanuel, Lucille Clifton, to see how they craft a poem. Then we'll try our hand at imitations. In this generative workshop with model poems, registrants will learn about a good number of craft techniques and strategies which can be of further use in the making of poems. The poems generated will be read to the group, and all will participate in giving helpful suggestions on what's working, what's not, and where to go next.

Please submit three poems, along with your current CV, when you register for the Fall Conference, and no later than October 21. Poems should be saved in a single MS Word document, using single-spaced, 12-point, Times New Roman font, and sent as an attachment to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Your name and the title of each poem should appear on the submission. Accepted registrants will also be asked to circulate their drafts to others in the class prior to the conference.

Each registrant should be ready to handle the intensive instruction and atmosphere of the Master Class.

 

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Manuscript Mart**Closed**

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-Registration is now closed. Register on-site beginning Friday, November 4.**

 

Manuscript Mart provides writers with the opportunity to submit their manuscripts and get feedback from an editor or agent with a leading publisher or literary agency. A one-on-one, thirty-minute session will be scheduled for you, to take place on Saturday, November 5, sometime between 9:00 am and 5:00 pm, or on Sunday, November 6, between 9:00 am and 12:30 pm.

Please note, a Manuscript Mart session can lead directly to publication—but don't expect it to do so. Think of it, instead, as a learning opportunity, and you'll get more out of it.

Manuscript Mart sessions are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. YOUR MANUSCRIPT MART REGISTRATION, WITH MANUSCRIPT AND PAYMENT ENCLOSED, MUST REACH THE NETWORK BY FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21.

 

Guidelines

Submit two copies of no more than twenty double-spaced, single-sided, sequential pages of your fiction or nonfiction manuscript, along with two copies of a one-page query or synopsis. Make sure your name is on each page of your manuscript, and number those pages.

All submissions must be double-spaced, in twelve-point Times New Roman font, printed on one side only of 8 1/2 x 11-inch paper, with one-inch margins.

You must be registered for the conference for your Manuscript Mart session to be scheduled.

North Carolina Writers’ Network
Fall Conference Manuscript Mart
PO Box 21591
Winston-Salem, NC 27120

Checklist:

  • two copies of manuscript and query letter
  • Manuscript Mart cover sheet;
  • Check to cover Manuscript Mart ($160);
  • A separate check to cover all other conference fees, if you are registering for the conference through the mail.

 

NOTE: If Manuscript Mart fills, your check will be returned to you.

 

Manuscript Mart Reviewers

From the names below, select your first, second, and third choice on your registration form. We will try to accommodate your first choice; if we cannot, we will select an appropriate editor or agent for you. The name of your assigned agent or editor, as well as the time and location of your session, will be included in the packet you will receive at the conference registration table.

Michelle Brower, Zachary Shuster Harmsworth**Closed**
Robin Miura, Carolina Wren Press**Closed**
Emma Patterson, Brandt & Hochman Literary Agents, Inc.**Closed**
Kathy Pories, Algonquin Books**Closed**

 

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Critique Service

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-Registration is now closed. Register on-site beginning Friday, November 4.**

 

The Critique Service provides writers with in-depth literary critique of fiction, nonfiction, or poetry, by a seasoned writer or editor. A one-on-one, thirty-minute review session will be scheduled for you, to take place on Saturday, November 5, sometime between 9:00 am and 5:00 pm, or on Sunday, November 6, between 9:00 am and 12:30 pm.

Critiques are scheduled on a first-come, first-served basis. YOUR CRITIQUE SERVICE REGISTRATION, WITH MANUSCRIPT AND PAYMENT ENCLOSED, MUST REACH THE NETWORK BY FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21.

 

Guidelines

Submit two copies of no more than twenty double-spaced, single-sided, sequential pages of your fiction or nonfiction manuscript (for book-length projects, you must include a one-page synopsis of the work as a whole, in addition to the twenty pages), or ten pages of poetry. Make sure your name is on each page of your submission. NUMBER YOUR PAGES.

Prose submissions must be double-spaced, in twelve-point Times New Roman font, printed on one side only of 8 1/2 x 11-inch paper, with one-inch margins.

Poetry submissions must be single-spaced, in twelve-point Times New Roman font, printed on one side only of 8 1/2 x 11-inch paper, with one-inch margins, and should include no more than one poem per page.

Download and print the Critique Service cover sheet, which you may also download from the online Registration Form at www.ncwriters.org. Mail it with two hard copies of your submission to:

North Carolina Writers’ Network
Fall Conference Critique Service
PO Box 21591
Winston-Salem, NC 27120

Checklist:

  • Two copies of manuscript (and synopsis, if appropriate);
  • Critique Service cover sheet;
  • Check to cover Critique Service ($150);
  • A separate check to cover all other conference fees if you are registering for the conference through the mail.

 

NOTE: If Critique Service fills, your check will be returned to you.

 

Critiquers

From the names below, select your first, second, and third choice. We will try to accommodate your first choice; if we cannot, we will select an appropriate critiquer for you. The name of your assigned critiquer, as well as the time and location of your session, will be included in the packet you will receive at the conference registration table.

Linda Hobson, Fiction, Nonfiction
Elizabeth Oliver, Fiction, Nonfiction
Eleanora E. Tate, Children's
Ross White, Poetry
Lynn York, Fiction

 

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Faculty Biographies

<Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-Registration is now closed. Register on-site beginning Friday, November 4.**

 

 

Clare Beams is the author of the forthcoming story collection We Show What We Have Learned (Lookout Books, 2016). Her stories appear in One Story, n+1, Ecotone, The Common, the Kenyon Review, Hayden’s Ferry Review, and The Best American Nonrequired Reading, and have received special mention in The Best American Short Stories 2013 and The Pushcart Prize XXXV. She is the recipient of awards from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, and currently blogs for Ploughshares. After teaching high school English for six years in Falmouth, Massachusetts, she moved with her husband and daughter to Pittsburgh, where she teaches creative writing at Saint Vincent College and the Pittsburgh Center for the Arts.

Michelle Brower began her career in publishing in 2004 while studying for her Master's degree in English Literature at New York University. During that time, she worked with the agents Wendy Sherman and Joelle Delbourgo. After graduating, she became an agent at Wendy Sherman Associates where she began representing books in a variety of areas within fiction and nonfiction. Recent books Brower has represented include: The House Girl (William Morrow 2013) by Tara Conklin, a New York Times bestseller, #1 Indie Next Pick, and Target Book Club Pick; The Book of Speculation by Erika Swyler (St. Martins 2015), which was a Barnes & Noble Discover Pick and Amazon Debut of the Month; The Girl Who Came Home (William Morrow 2014) by internationally bestselling author Hazel Gaynor; as well as the New York Times bestseller The Returned by Jason Mott (MIRA 2014), which was the basis of the ABC television series Resurrection. She is interested in fiction that pays equal attention to both the voice and the story, particularly literary fiction, thrillers and literary mysteries, smart women's fiction, "book club" fiction that brings a tear to the eye and a thrill to the heart, and books with a fantastic/paranormal element that reach beyond genre. She is also selectively representing YA with the same qualities. In nonfiction, she is mostly interested in subject-driven narratives, memoirs, or journalism.

Mark Cantrell is the author of A Weird-Oh World: The Art of Bill Campbell, The Everything Weather Book, and co-author of Saddam: The Face of Evil and Sixteen Minutes From Home: The Space Shuttle Columbia Tragedy. He has written hundreds of articles for publications such as Military Officer Magazine, Air&Space Smithsonian, Baylor Innovations and MAD Magazine.

Shervon Cassim is a writer and lawyer who was born and raised in Dubai. He holds an MFA in Creative Writing from North Carolina State University, where he teaches fiction writing.

Kim Church's debut novel Byrd (Dzanc Books, 2014) received the Crook’s Corner Book Prize, among many other awards and honors. Her short work appears in the Norton anthology Flash Fiction Forward, The Sun Magazine, Shenandoah, and elsewhere. She is the recipient of a 2016 literature fellowship from the North Carolina Arts Council. She lives in Raleigh with her husband, artist Anthony Ulinski.

Howard L. Craft is a poet, playwright, and arts educator. He is a recipient of the North Carolina Arts Council Playwriting Fellowship and is the author of several plays. The Off-Off Broadway Production of his most recent work Freight: The Five Incarnations of Abel Green was chosen as the New York Times critic’s pick during its run. Craft is also the creator of the first African-American Super Hero Radio Serial, The Jade City Pharaoh. He teaches creative writing as the Piller Visiting Professor of Practice at the University Of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and creative nonfiction through the Duke Center For Documentary Studies. More information about Howard Craft as well as reviews of his work can be found at www.howardcraft.com.

Angela Davis-Gardner is the author of four critically acclaimed novels (most recently Plum Wine and Butterfly’s Child). Her short stories have appeared in numerous journals, including Narrative, Blackbird, Chicago Tribune Printers Row, and Shenandoah. An Alumni Distinguished Professor at N.C. State University, she has won several teaching awards for her work with MFA and undergraduate writing students. Her own MFA is from UNC-Greensboro.

Christa Gala is a professional freelance writer and adjunct professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's School of Media and Journalism. In 2015, she combined teaching with the launch of Raleigh Magazine, a monthly publication featuring a hybrid of news journalism and lifestyle writing. Christa has written for www.golfdigest.com, North Carolina State University, Our State, and The News & Observer in Raleigh, among others. She was a columnist for the Cary News; her work has also been featured in four Chicken Soup for the Soul books. Her clients have included Girl Scouts of America, Kentucky Fried Chicken, Duke Medical Center, Hummingbird Creative Group, and a variety of regional restaurants and businesses.

Corbie Hill makes a freelance living by writing constantly: in 2015, nearly 200 features, profiles and columns bearing his byline ran in regional papers and magazines. His primary outlet is The News & Observer in Raleigh, though he also regularly appears in INDY Week, Midtown Magazine, Mountain XPress, Charlotte Viewpoint, Creative Loafing Charlotte, and a number of other publications.

Linda Hobson, the author of a book on novelist Walker Percy and editor of a second, has a Ph.D in English from the University of Alabama and is a graduate of both Denison and Duke. She is at present an editor and book reviewer. Hobson has edited many published works of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry as well as taught writing to adults and to secondary- and university-level students. Her literary interests are American fiction and nonfiction and English/British literature.

Haven Kimmel was raised in Mooreland, Indiana, the focus of her bestselling memoir, A Girl Named Zippy. She is the other of four other novels, a second memoir and two children’s books. Kimmel earned her undergraduate degree in English and creative writing from Ball Sate University and attended North Carolina State University, as well as the seminary at the Earlham School of Religion. She lives in Durham.

Bridgette A. Lacy is an award-winning journalist with a public love affair with food and culture. She worked as a features writer and food columnist for The News & Observer in Raleigh for many years. She’s written about food, chefs and culinary trends for INDY Week and the North Carolina Arts Council. She's the author of Sunday Dinner, a part of the Savor the South series by UNC Press, and a finalist for the Pat Conroy Cookbook Prize.

Dorianne Laux’s fifth collection, The Book of Men, winner of The Paterson Prize, is available from W.W. Norton. Her fourth book of poems, Facts about the Moon, won The Oregon Book Award and was short-listed for the Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize. Laux is also author of Awake (Carnegie Mellon Classic Contemporary) What We Carry (finalist for the National Book Critic’s Circle Award) and Smoke, as well as two fine small press editions, The Book of Women and Dark Charms, both from Red Dragonfly Press. Co-author of The Poet's Companion: A Guide to the Pleasures of Writing Poetry, she’s the recipient of three Best American Poetry Prizes, a Pushcart Prize, two fellowships from The National Endowment for the Arts and a Guggenheim Fellowship. She directs the Program in Creative Writing at North Carolina State University and is founding faculty of Pacific University's Low Residency MFA Program.

Zelda Lockhart is currently pursuing her Ph.D in Expressive Art Therapies at Lesley University, holds an MA in Literature from Old Dominion University and a BA in English from Norfolk State University. She is author of award winning novels Fifth Born, Cold Running Creek and Fifth Born II: The Hundredth Turtle. Her other works of fiction, poetry and essays can be found in anthologies, journals and magazines. Ms. Lockhart lives in Hillsborough, is Director of LaVenson Press Studios, and travels and lectures regularly. She s the Alumni Endowed Chair for Language and Literature at North Carolina Central University, and welcomes visits to her websites where you can follow her calendar of engagements: www.zeldalockhart.com and www.LaVensonPressStudios.com.

Ian J. Malone is the author of the sci-fi/space opera series, The Mako Saga, and owner of Durham-based Sharkflight Publishing. A graduate of Florida State University, he’s written in a number of arenas ranging from public health to news and sports. When it comes to his fictional work, however, Malone credits his tenures in radio, law enforcement, and the military for much of his thematic inspiration, plus the legion of family and friends who’ve stood with him along the way. Beyond writing, Malone is an avid fan of audiobooks and music, though it’s also not uncommon to find him at a beach, a ball field, or somewhere by a grill. Malone presently resides in the Bull City with his wife, son, and their two dogs—but he’ll always be a “Florida boy” at heart. For more on him and his books, visit him online at www.ianjmalone.net.

Margaret Maron is the author of thirty novels and two collections of short stories. Winner of several major American awards for mysteries (Edgar, Agatha, Anthony, Macavity), her works are on the reading lists of various courses in contemporary Southern literature and have been translated into sixteen languages. A native Tar Heel, she still lives on her family's century farm a few miles southeast of Raleigh, the setting for Bootlegger's Daughter, which is numbered among the 100 Favorite Mysteries of the Century as selected by the Independent Mystery Booksellers Association. In 2004, she received the Sir Walter Raleigh Award for best North Carolina novel of the year. In 2008, she was honored with the North Carolina Award for Literature. (The North Carolina Award is the state’s highest civilian honor.) In 2013, she was named a Grand Master by Mystery Writers of America for lifetime achievement, and in 2016, she will be inducted into the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame.

Jen McConnel is an award-winning author. She writes Young Adult and New Adult fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. When she isn’t writing, she can be found on her yoga mat, teaching, or wandering off on another adventure. She grew up in mid-Michigan, attending Western Michigan University, and now lives with her family in North Carolina. She holds a MS in Library Science from Clarion University of Pennsylvania, and she is currently working on her MA in Children’s Literature at Hollins University.

Joseph Millar's first collection, Overtime, was a finalist for the 2001 Oregon Book Award. His second collection, Fortune, appeared in 2007, followed by a third, Blue Rust, in 2012. Millar grew up in Pennsylvania and attended Johns Hopkins University before spending thirty years in the San Francisco Bay area working at a variety of jobs, from telephone repairman to commercial fisherman. It would be two decades before he returned to poetry. He has won fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts, as well as a Pushcart Prize and has appeared in such magazines as DoubleTake, TriQuarterly, The Southern Review, APR, and Ploughshares. Millar teaches in Pacific University's low-residency MFA and at North Carolina State University.

Donna Miscolta is the winner of the 2015 Doris Bakwin Award for Writing by a Woman with her novel Hola and Goodbye. Carolina Wren Press will publish Hola and Goodbye in the fall of 2016. She also is the author of the novel When the de la Cruz Family Danced. Her story “Ana’s Dance” won the 2013 Lascaux Prize for Short Fiction. Recent work has appeared in Bluestem, Hawaii Pacific Review, Waxwing, and Spartan. Her story “Strong Girls” appeared in Calyx’s 40th-anniversary issue. A 2014 recipient of an Artist Trust Fellowship, she has also received awards from 4Culture, the Bread Loaf/Rona Jaffe Foundation, and the City of Seattle, as well as residencies from Anderson Center, Artsmith, Atlantic Center for the Arts, Hedgebrook, Ragdale, and Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. She lives in Seattle but grew up in National City, CA. Find out more at www.donnamiscolta.com.

Robin Miura is the director of Carolina Wren Press, where she manages and edits the Lee Smith Novel Prize and the Bakwin Award for Writing by a Woman. She has edited many different kinds of books during her sixteen-year publishing career, first as a production editor for Oxford University Press and then as a freelance editor for individual authors and for publishers including Algonquin Books, Duke University Press, and River’s Edge Media, among others. She now works mainly with fiction and memoir. She is also one of the founding editors of the online magazine South Writ Large (www.southwritlarge.com).

Lenard D. Moore, a North Carolina native and U.S. Army Veteran, is the founder and Executive Director of the Carolina African American Writers’ Collective and Co-founder of the Washington Street Writers Group. Moore’s poems, short stories, essays and reviews have appeared in over 400 publications. Currently, Moore is Associate Professor of English at the University of Mount Olive, where he directs the literary festival.

Debbie Moose grew up in Winston-Salem and is the author of six cookbooks, including two in the popular Savor the South series published by the University of North Carolina Press: Buttermilk and Southern Holidays. Her other books are Deviled Eggs: 50 Recipes from Simple to Sassy, Fan Fare: A Playbook of Great Recipes for Tailgating or Watching the Game at Home, Wings: More Than 50 High-Flying Recipes for America's Favorite Snack and Potato Salad: 65 Recipes from Classic to Cool. Along with being a cooking teacher, writing teacher and editor, Debbie's work as a freelance writer has appeared in Our State, Edible Piedmont, Gravy, and other publications. She is a former food editor for The News & Observer in Raleigh and still writes for the paper. Debbie is a member of the Southern Foodways Alliance and the Association of Food Journalists. Find out more at www.debbiemoose.com, or connect with her on Twitter or Facebook.

Elizabeth Oliver is the founding managing editor of The Rambler, a national literary magazine. She has extensive experience critiquing and editing across genres, from flash fiction to long memoir pieces. She is passionate about the preservation of personal voice in stories and has worked with writers with a variety of experience, from beginners to accomplished authors. Oliver holds a BA in journalism and an MFA in creative writing; her work has appeared in various publications and the flash fiction anthology Long Story Short (UNC Press).

Author of the memoir, Gods of Noonday: A White Girl’s African Life and a novel, A Different Sun: A Novel of Africa, Elaine Neil Orr casts her stories in two Souths: the American South and the Nigerian South. Her novel-in-progress (publication 2017) is set in Winston-Salem, with back-story in Ibadan, Nigeria. She has published in numerous literary magazines, including Image, Blackbird, Shenandoah, and Southern Cultures, and is the recipient of awards from the North Carolina Arts Council, the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. She was the 2016 Campbell-Stripling Distinguished Writer-in-Residence at Wesleyan College. Elaine teaches in the English Department at NCSU and is on the faculty of the brief-residency MFA at Spalding University in Louisville.

Alice Osborn’s past educational (MA in English, NCSU, and BS in Finance, VA Tech) and work experience is unusually varied, and it now feeds her work as an editor, writing coach, and poet-musician. In the past decade, Alice has taught writing workshops to thousands of aspiring fiction and memoir authors of nearly all ages, both around the corner and across continents. Heroes without Capes is her most recent collection of poetry. Previous collections are After the Steaming Stops and Unfinished Projects. Alice is also the editor of the anthologies Tattoos and Creatures of Habitat, both from Main Street Rag. A North Carolina Writers’ Network board member and a Pushcart Prize nominee, her work has appeared in The News and Observer in Raleigh, The Broad River Review, Pedestal Magazine, Soundings Review, and in numerous journals and anthologies. When she’s not editing or writing, Alice is an Irish dancer who plays guitar and violin. She lives in Raleigh with her husband, two children, four loud birds, and Mr. Nibbles, the guinea pig. Visit Alice's website at www.aliceosborn.com.

Emma Patterson grew up in New Jersey as an avid reader and the daughter of a literary agent. After attending Kenyon College in the Ohio cornfields and graduating with a degree in history, she began her career in publishing at The Wendy Weil Agency, where she stayed for nine years, working with writers that included Mark Helprin, Rita Mae Brown, Anthony Doerr, Karen Joy Fowler, Alice Walker, and Andrea Barrett. In 2013, Emma joined Brandt & Hochman, where she represents fiction ranging from dark, literary novels to upmarket women’s and historical fiction—with special interest in the 19th and 20th centuries—and narrative non-fiction that includes memoir, investigative journalism, and popular history. Her young adult fiction and non-fiction interests are along similar lines. She is drawn to both domestic and far-flung settings that are original and transporting. She is looking for fresh, lyrical, and voice-driven writing, suspenseful plots, emotional narratives, and unforgettable characters.

Kathy Pories has been a Senior Editor at Algonquin Books for twenty years. She acquires literary fiction and narrative nonfiction. Authors she has worked with include: Gabrielle Zevin, Rebecca Lee, Lee Smith, Bill Roorbach, Lauren Grodstein, Michael Parker, Hillary Jordan, Steve Almond, Robert Olmstead, Heidi Durrow, and others. She received her Ph.D in English Literature from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

John Shelton Reed is a writer and lecturer who lives in Chatham county, North Carolina. He has written or edited twenty books, including 1001 Things Everyone Should Know About the South and Holy Smoke: The Big Book of North Carolina Barbecue, both written with his wife, Dale Volberg Reed. He belongs to the Fellowship of Southern Writers and served recently as that organization's chancellor. He taught for some years at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, retiring in 2000 as William Rand Kenan Jr. Professor of sociology and director of the Howard Odum Institute for Research in Social Science. He was founding co-editor of the quarterly Southern Cultures and helped to found the university's Center for the Study of the American South. He serves as Éminence Grease of the Campaign for Real Barbecue (www.TrueCue.org).

Linda Rohrbough has been writing since 1989, and has more than 5,000 articles and seven books to her credit, along with writing for television, and seven national awards for her fiction and non-fiction. An iPhone App of Linda’s popular “Pitch Your Book” workshop is available in the Apple iTunes store. Visit her website: www.LindaRohrbough.com.

Dr. Sheila Smith McKoy, a native of Raleigh, is professor of English and Department Chair at Kennesaw State University. She is the editor emeritus of Obsidian: Literature in the African Diaspora. A poet, literary critic, fiction writer and documentary filmmaker, Smith McKoy’s work has appeared in numerous publications including the critically acclaimed Schomburg series African American Women Writers 1910 – 1940, Black Gold, Callaloo, Contours, Journal of Ethnic American Literature, Mythium, Obsidian: Literature in the African Diaspora, Research for African Literatures, and Valley Voices. Her critical books include The Elizabeth Keckley Reader (Eno Publishers, 2016), a two-volume series, and When Whites Riot: Writing Race and Violence in American and South African Cultures (U of Wisconsin Press, 2001) which received critical attention in the U.S. and in South Africa.

Shelby Stephenson has published many collections of poems, plus the poetic documentary Plankhouse (with photos by Roger Manley). Shelby is former editor of Pembroke Magazine. His Family Matters: Homage to July, the Slave Girl won the 2008 Bellday Poetry Prize, judged by Allen Grossman. He was a 2014 inductee to the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame. Since 2015, Shelby has served his home state as North Carolina’s Poet Laureate. His website is www.shelbystephenson.com.

Eleanora E. Tate has conducted creative writing workshops in schools, community centers, for SCBWI, and in libraries and universities for children and adults for over forty years. A NCWN critiquer, NCWN conference workshop leader, and former NCWN board member, she’s the author of twelve novels for young readers. Her book Just an Overnight Guest was adapted into an acclaimed television film. In 2015, Tate was honored by the North Carolina Museum of History and the Wake County Library system for her contributions to children’s literature. The South Carolina House of Representatives and the South Carolina Senate previously cited her for her literary and community activism. Her books have been on numerous state children’s book reading lists over the years. She’s a Zora Neale Hurston Award recipient, the highest award given by the National Association of Black Storytellers, Inc., of which she is a former national president. She was also named to the organization’s “Esteemed Elders Circle.” www.eleanoraetate.com.

Art Taylor is the author of On the Road with Del & Louise: A Novel in Stories, winner of the Agatha Award for Best First Novel and a finalist for both the Anthony and the Macavity Award for Best First Novel. He edited the collection Murder Under the Oaks, a finalist for this year’s Anthony for Best Anthology. He has also won two Agatha Awards, the Anthony Award, the Macavity Award, and three consecutive Derringer Awards for his short fiction. Stories have appeared in Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, in the Chesapeake Crime anthologies This Job Is Murder, Homicidal Holidays and Storm Warning, and in other journals and anthologies. He teaches at George Mason University and contributes frequently to the Washington Post, the Washington Independent Review of Books, and Mystery Scene.

Chris Tonelli works in the libraries at North Carolina State University and co-owns So & So Books in downtown Raleigh, where he lives with his wife, Allison, and their two kids, Miles and Vera. He is a founding editor of the independent poetry press Birds, LLC, and he curates the So & So Series and edits So & So Magazine. He is the author of five chapbooks and a full-length collection, The Trees Around (Birds, LLC).

Mitch Tuchman is an intellectual property attorney in the RTP office of Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice, LLP. Before he became an attorney, Mitch spent fourteen years as the head of the publications department at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. He has also been a freelance writer for more than four decades. Consequently a significant focus of his legal practice is in the realm of copyright matters. Mitch understands copyright issues from the author’s perspective because he has been both a writer and publisher himself. Mitch writes and speaks frequently on copyright law, most recently about the nine unsuccessful plaintiffs who sued James Cameron, claiming his motion picture Avatar infringed their works.

Donald Vaughan has been making his living with words for thirty-eight years, and has worked as a full-time freelance writer for twenty-five years. During that time, he has published more than 1,900 articles and columns in an eclectic array of markets, including The News & Observer in Raleigh, Writer’s Digest, Boys’ Life, Military Officer Magazine, Cure Magazine and MAD Magazine. In addition, Don has written, co-written, or contributed to more than thirty books on topics ranging from the Civil War to American festivals. He is the founder of Triangle Association of Freelancers, one of the largest organizations in North Carolina devoted to all aspect of freelance writing.

A Brit living outside Hillsborough, Barbara Claypole White writes hopeful family drama with a healthy dose of mental illness. The Unfinished Garden won the 2013 Golden Quill Contest for Best First Book; The In-Between Hour was chosen by the Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance as a Winter 2014 Okra Pick; and The Perfect Son was a nominee in the Goodreads Choice Awards for Best Fiction 2015. Her latest novel, Echoes of Family, has a publication date of September 27. For more information, or to connect with Barbara, visit www.barbaraclaypolewhite.com.

Ross White is the author of How We Came Upon the Colony and The Polite Society, both from Unicorn Press. His poems have appeared in American Poetry Review, Best New Poets 2012, New England Review, Poetry Daily, and The Southern Review, among others. He is the executive director of Bull City Press and teaches creative writing at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Brook Wilensky-Lanford is the author of Paradise Lust: Searching for the Garden of Eden, a New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice, and editor of the online magazine Killing the Buddha. She writes about religion and culture for The New Republic, The Guardian, The New Yorker books blog, and elsewhere, and has recently relocated to Chapel Hill to pursue her Ph.D in American Religious History.

Lynn York is the author of two novels: The Piano Teacher (Plume, 2004) and The Sweet Life (Plume, 2007), a Booksense Notable Book. She has taught workshops at Duke’s Osher Institute, the Duke Summer Writer’s Workshop, NC State University, and High Point University. She serves on the Board of Directors of the NC Arts Council and the NC Art Society and lives in Chapel Hill.

 

 

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Support for the 2016 Fall Conference is provided by the NC Arts CouncilAl Manning, Alice Osborn: Editor/Book Coach/Author, The 2017 Piedmont Laureate Program, UNC Press, Marc Graham, author of Of Ashes and Dust, and the William M. Hendricks Family Foundation.

 

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