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Tag Archives: literary magazines

Legit Southerners Only: The Mule

“No good Southern fiction is complete without a dead mule,” says Val MacEwan, editor and publisher of The Dead Mule School of Southern Literature. The distinctive name of this online literary magazine, founded in 1996, orginiated in a paper about “Equine Signifiers in Southern Literature” by Dr. Jerry Leath Mills, and it’s a fitting moniker […]

Where the A-List Literary Celebrities Mingle

For more than a quarter century, the North Carolina Literary Review (NCLR) has published most of the great writers from North Carolina as well as high-quality writing about the Tar Heel State. Part scholarly journal, part literary rag, NCLR offers—as one early reviewer put it— “everything you ever wanted out of a literary publication but […]

Rockvale Review Ready to Launch

For all you poets out there, there’s a new kid in town, and a great new venue for showcasing your poetry. Rockvale Review is currently reading for its inaugural issue to be published in November. Seekers of “bold and vulnerable poetry,” Rockvale Review: …believes language is power, and poetry is one conduit into unleashing that […]

The Statue of Liberty Is a Redhead

Every time a poem gets rejected, another angel gets its wings. Or something like that. In his acclaimed poem “Howl,” Beat poet Allen Ginsberg claimed the energetic books of Jack Kerouac, William Burroughs, and Neal Cassady were all “published in Heaven.” Luckily for today’s poets, Heaven is a place on Earth. Redheaded Stepchild literary magazine […]

at Length Explores Form and the Limit of Our Attention Spans

It’s revolutionary, really, in this day and age, when even our government communicates to its citizens in 140-character tweets, to devote an entire literary publication to “ambitious, in-depth writing.” After all, a human is now said to have less attention span than a goldfish. And yet. At Length, based mostly in the Triangle, has garnered attention […]

#FolkLife

For generations, the North Carolina Folklore Journal has served as a chronicle and sounding board for the likes of Belled Buzzards, shape-note singing, and sweet potatoes. If it’s part of folklife, more than likely it’s been found between the pages of a journal that has been published continuously since 1954. Published by the NC Folklore […]

New New South and the Slow Lit Movement

Officially, the term “New South” refers to the Southern United States in the years since the Civil War. Inherent in the phrase “New South” is a push toward modernization, an easing of restrictive social and economic barriers, and a question of transformation—no longer able to be what one was, what then does one become? For […]

Rejected So Many Times, Publication Becomes Inevitable

The year might be nearly half over, but there’s still plenty of time for rejections to pile up. However, you’ll never get rejected if you don’t submit! In 2016, Lit Hub encouraged writers to aim for 100 rejections a year, arguing that quantity would eventually lead to quality: In the book Art & Fear, authors […]

More Writing Goodness, per Inch, than You’ll Find Anywhere

In this modern age of tweeting and live stream, where even many of the most traditional publishers feel compelled to have some sort of online presence and offer online content, it’s refreshing—if not downright inspiring in a kind of “Do You Hear the People Sing?” kind of way—that the literary magazine Inch is, well, defiantly low-fi. […]

Nearing 70, The Carolina Quarterly Ages Gracefully

Not a lot of literary magazines—or many endeavors, really—can trace their roots back to before the Civil War. But The Carolina Quarterly, published at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, can point to the year 1844 as the founding of North Carolina University Magazine which, through several iterations during America’s highs and lows, […]