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Sightless Among Miracles: The (Possibly True) Story of Samson and Delilah

Sightless Among Miracles: The (Possibly True) Story of Samson and Delilah

By Ellyn BachePublisher: Aggadah Try It/Madness Heart PressISBN: 978-1-955745-34-5Genre: Novella, Jewish Fiction and Literature, Speculative Fiction, Fantasy,Price: Kindle - $2.49; Paperback - $12.95
Available from: PaperbackKindle

In this modern retelling of the Samson and Delilah story there's one major twist. Sam is a girl! 
From the start she knows she has a momentous task to perform -- but she's never told what it is. All she knows is that it involves the abnormal strength that often only embarrasses her, a prohibition against drinking fermented beverages, and a warning against cutting her wild, unruly hair.


She is always on edge. Driving too fast. Engaging in small acts of vandalism. Setting fires. Sleeping with too many men. All this even as she holds fast to her family's expectation that she study law and follow her father into a legal career. She pays no attention to the warning that one of her lovers will be her downfall. She wants to be a light in the world rather than a source of darkness, but she is lost-- until the single, shocking event that defines her luminous final moments.

Ellyn Bache is the award-winning author of nine novels (one of which was made into a movie starring Susan Sarandon), a short story collection that won the Willa Cather Fiction Prize, and dozens of other articles, short stories and plays. She grew up in Washington DC but has spent most of her adult life in the Carolinas, first in Wilmington and then in Greenville, South Carolina, where she enjoys the colorful deciduous trees but misses the ocean. More about her is on her website, www.ellynbache.com.

Reviews

Bache writes with flair and frequent humor to underline a few lessons. One, an ordinary life is a far greater blessing than you imagine. And two, Yahweh is still around, and in a world that doesn’t believe in miracles anymore, maybe we should.

-- Ben Steelman, Wilmington Star-News