NC Literary Hall of Fame

 

 

2022 SPRING CONFERENCE

MHRA Building (Corner of Spring Garden and Forest Streets)
University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Saturday, April 23

                                 UNC Greensboro   

The North Carolina Writers' Network and the MFA in Creative Writing Program at UNC-Greensboro bring you a full day of classes, workshops, conversations, and more.

This year’s Spring Conference again will be in UNCG’s MHRA Building, on the corner of Spring Garden and Forest Streets, and in Curry Auditorium next door, offering classes and discussions on the craft and business of writing and publishing.

PLEASE NOTE: All registrants, faculty, and exhibitors must provide proof of full vaccination against COVID-19 to attend the 2022 Spring Conference. We will follow or exceed all state and federal safety protocols in place at the time of the conference.

 

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Download Registration Form

 

FEES AND DEADLINES | SCHEDULE-AT-A-GLANCE | MASTER CLASS | FULL CONFERENCE SCHEDULE WITH COURSES | FACULTY BIOGRAPHIES


Fees and Deadlines

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Registration ends 12:00 pm on Monday, April 18.

Registration:
ON-SITE CONFERENCE

  • $100 for members
  • $150 for non-members

 

Registration:
ONLINE CONFERENCE

  • $75 for members
  • $125 for non-members

Day-of registration will not be available for the 2022 Spring Conference.

You can join the Network when you register, and pay the member rates plus the appropriate member dues:

$80 standard 1-year membership
$60 reduced membership (senior 65+, full-time student, writers under 30, writers with disabilities)
$140 2-year membership
$110 2-year reduced membership

 

Scholarships

A limited amount of scholarship aid is available to deserving writers who otherwise could not attend the 2022 Spring Conference. If you would like to apply for a scholarship, please send a C.V. and a letter of interest to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. no later than Friday, April 1.

In addition to our general scholarship aid, "More Seats" Scholarships are available to attend the Spring Conference thanks to the generosity of an anonymous donor. More Seats Scholarships seek to add “more seats” to the literary table by encouraging beginning writers from underserved communities, especially writers from rural counties, writers of color, and LGBTQ+ writers. Selection criteria will focus on commitment to writing, rather than degrees or publications.

To apply, send a current CV—with contact information and a list of any work, education, publications, or other relevant literary experiences or achievements—and a Statement of Writing Intent of no more than 1,000 words to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., no later than Friday, April 1. The subject line should specify the applicant’s interest in a More Seats Scholarship. Questions should be sent to that e-mail address, as well.

For the first time, Elliott Bowles Screenwriting Scholarships also will be available to help aspiring screenwriters attend the Spring Conference. The Elliott Bowles Screenwriters Scholarships are open to applications from any North Carolina resident who has written an unproduced and unoptioned screenplay. For more information, please follow the link above, or e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Cancellations

Cancellations must be made in writing and arrive at the Network office (via USPS or e-mail) by 4:00 pm, Thursday, April 14, for you to receive a refund, less 25 percent. Send request to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. No refunds for cancellations received after April 14 or for no-shows.

 

For Writers with Special Needs

The North Carolina Writers' Network strives to make our programs and services accessible to all writers, including those with special needs. If you require conference materials either in large print or in Braille, or if you require a sign-language interpreter, please register for the conference and submit your request to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. no later than Monday, April 11. If you require any other special assistance, please let us know as soon as possible at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. We will do our best to accommodate all reasonable requests.

 

Deadlines

  • April 1: Deadline for all scholarship applications
  • April 8: Deadline for Master Class registration (see guidelines)
  • April 11: Deadline for special-needs requests
  • April 14: Deadline to receive a refund for cancellation
  • April 18: Deadline for registration
  • April 23: Spring Conference in session

 

VENUE AND PARKING

The 2022 Spring Conference will be held in the Moore Humanities & Research Administration (MHRA) Building on the UNCG campus, 1111 Spring Garden St., Greensboro, NC, 27403, and in the Curry Auditorium next door. The MHRA Building is located at the corner of Spring Garden and Forest Streets.

Parking will be available for Spring Conference registrants in the Oakland Avenue Parking Deck, across Forest Street from the MHRA Building (behind Yum Yum Better Ice Cream and Old Town Draught House).

A map of the UNCG campus is available here.

 

Nearby Hotels

The Greensboro Convention & Visitors Bureau can help you find accommodations in the area. Please visit http://www.visitgreensboronc.com.

 

E-Packets

In an effort to save money, time, and resources, the Network will send to all 2022 Spring Conference registrants, exhibitors, and faculty an E-Packet prior to April 23. The E-Packet will contain all the usual conference packet materials in the form of a PDF that registrants can print or download to a device to bring with them to the conference.

Name tags, personalized schedules, and copies of the Schedule-at-a-Glance will still be available at the registration table the day of the conference.

Traditional printed packets will not be available at this conference.

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Schedule-at-a-Glance

Schedules subject to change

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ON-SITE CONFERENCE

Saturday, April 23
8:00-9:00am Registration Open (MHRA Lobby)
8:30 am - 5:00 pm Exhibit Tables and Book Sales Open (MHRA Lobby)
9:00 am - 10:00 am Keynote Address by Carole Boston Weatherford (Curry Auditorium)
10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Session I

12:00-1:00 pm Lunch
Under UNCG’s current COVID-19 guidelines, we will not be able to offer Lunch with an Author or any food or beverage at the on-site Spring Conference. If their guidelines change in time, we will give registrants an opportunity to order some sort of on-site lunch. Either way, we will provide all registrants with a list of quick and convenient lunch options within walking distance of the MHRA Building.
1:15-2:15 pm Faculty Readings
2:30-4:00 pm

Session II

4:30-5:30pm

Open Mic Readings - Sign up at registration table

5:30-6:30pm

Slush Pile Live!

 

ONLINE CONFERENCE

Saturday, April 23
9:00 am - 10:00 am Keynote Address by Carole Boston Weatherford (Livestreamed from UNCG)
10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Session I

  • In Flux(us) (all genres) with Steven SherrillOnline Only
  • Hitting a Home Run: Pitching to & Getting Published in Magazines with Rachel PriestOnline Only
12:00-1:00 pm
1:15-2:15 pm Faculty Readings (Livestreamed from UNCG)
2:30-4:00 pm

Session II

  • The Sound of Prose with Maegan PolandOnline Only
  • What Publishers Really Want from Authors: Building an Audience Before Your First Book Comes Out with Meg ReidOnline Only
4:30-5:30pm

Online Open Mic I—Online Only
Online Open Mic II—Online Only

5:30-6:30pm

Slush Pile Live!

 

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Master Class

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Master Classes offer advanced writers a chance to delve more deeply into a particular genre. Each Master Class will take place over the course of Sessions I and II, and will be limited to the first 10 qualified registrants.

While publication credits are not required, Master Class participants should be experienced writers, dedicated to their craft. Applications will be reviewed, and qualified registrants admitted, on a rolling basis, until the Master Class if full or the deadline of Friday, April 8, whichever comes first.

Please submit your current CV, along with the required manuscript (see each Master Class’s course description, below, for its manuscript requirements), to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., on the day you register for the Spring Conference. You cannot be considered for a Master Class until we receive your CV and required manuscript. Again, the deadline to apply for a Master Class is Friday, April 8.

When you register for the Spring Conference, if applying for a Master Class, please choose another workshop as a back-up for each session, in case you are not admitted to the Master Class. Application to a Master Class requires a non-refundable $20 processing fee, in addition to the Spring Conference registration fee. If registering for the conference online or by phone, you can pay this processing fee with a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover. If registering by mail, you must include a separate check for $20.

 

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Full Conference Schedule with Course Descriptions

ON-SITE CONFERENCE

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8:00–9:00 am Registration Open (MHRA Lobby)

8:30 am – 5:00 pm Exhibits and Book Sales Open (MHRA Lobby)

9:00 am–10:00 am Keynote Address by Carole Boston Weatherford
Hailed by Huffington Post as a “master of picture book nonfiction,” Carole Boston Weatherford is a Newberry Honor author, New York Times bestseller, and two-time NAACP Image Award winner. Since her 1995 debut, she has published 50-plus books including these Caldecott Honor winners: Freedom in Congo Square, Voice of Freedom: Fannie Lou Hamer: Spirit of the Civil Rights Movement, and Moses: When Harriet Tubman Led Her People to Freedom. Six of her books have won Coretta Scott King Awards or Honors. A graduate of the Creative Writing MFA program at UNC Greensboro, Weatherford was inducted into the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame in 2020.

10:30 am – 12:00 pm Session I

Creative Nonfiction Master Class: Writing with Urgency with Belle Boggs**Closed**
Many writing teachers counsel us to save experiences we’re too close to for later—why not wait until you can get some distance and perspective? (I have given this advice myself!) But my experience writing about urgent personal and political issues has also taught me that developing a writing practice around contemporaneous note-taking, research, journaling, and interviews can be a way of producing work that feels urgent and alive. This nonfiction workshop will balance workshop discussion of short pieces with in-class planning for how to energize and sustain a longer nonfiction project. Our focus will be on using observation, research, interviews, and experience to create immersive work that is relevant and necessary.

Please submit up to 1,500 sequential words from a single work, along with your current CV in a separate attachment, on the same day that you register for the conference. Submissions should be saved in an MS Word document, using double-spaced 12-point Times New Roman font, with numbered pages, and sent as an attachment to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The Word document’s file name should include your own last name, and the title of the work and your name should appear on the submission itself. If accepted into the Master Class, your submitted work will be shared with other Master Class registrants.

Each registrant should be ready to handle the intensive instruction and atmosphere of the Master Class.

Fiction Master Class: Cause-and-Effect in Fiction with Derek Palacio**Closed**
This course will explore cause-and-effect dynamics within plot development. Through critique of student work and analysis of a few, short published texts, we will examine how cause-and-effect functions in narrative. We will investigate how to build plots that derive from interesting and revealing character choices, and we will seek to gain a better understanding of why cause-and-effect, when judiciously employed, can lead to more complex yet cohesive narrative structures.

Please submit up to 1,500 sequential words from a single work, along with your current CV in a separate attachment, on the same day that you register for the conference. Submissions should be saved in an MS Word document, using double-spaced 12-point Times New Roman font, with numbered pages, and sent as an attachment to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The Word document’s file name should include your own last name, and the title of the work and your name should appear on the submission itself. If accepted into the Master Class, your submitted work will be shared with other Master Class registrants.

Each registrant should be ready to handle the intensive instruction and atmosphere of the Master Class.

Poetry Master Class: River of Time and Art with Laura Mullen**Closed**
We feel ourselves to float now, precariously, uncertainly, in a river of time that seems rapid, forceful, and unruly—it’s all too easy to fear we’ll be thrown out of the boat and submerged. “Poetry,” writes Joy Harjo in her memoir Poet Warrior, “is a tool to navigate transformation.” What better way to move through these straits than with(in) art? This workshop will be generative, there will be exercises and prompts, productive of new poetry, and then (looking at previous work) will also offer strategies for revision, grounded in a recognition of your singular and special powers, with a focus on self-awareness and self-acceptance, as we learn to go with the creative flow and move fearlessly toward the wide open.

Please submit three poems, totaling no more than five pages, on the same day that you register for the conference, along with your current CV in a separate attachment. Poems should be saved in a single MS Word document, using single-spaced, 12-point, Times New Roman font, and sent as an attachment to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The Word document’s file name should include your own last name, and your name and the title of each poem should appear on the submission. If accepted into the Master Class, your submitted work will be shared with other Master Class registrants.

Each registrant should be ready to handle the intensive instruction and atmosphere of the Master Class.

Query an Agent About Querying Agents with Jamie Chambliss
If you have questions about finding and working with an agent—how to narrow down your search to likely fits, how to write and send a query, and what to expect when an agent says 'yes'—then this class gives you 90 minutes to ask them. Beginning with an intensive on how to write an effective query, the class then will move into an open Q&A on contemporary agenting and publishing.

Public, Private, and Poetic Place with Charmaine Cadeau
Filmmaker Peter Greenaway stated, “I’ve always been fascinated by maps and cartography. A map tells you where you’ve been, where you are, and where you’re going—in a sense it’s three tenses in one.” This generative writing workshop focuses on exploring our literal and conceptual worlds. How might a poem map a geographical place? A memory? A body? Using exercises that play with the idea of mapping, participants will draft new work that explores real and imagined places.

The Speaking Words: On Writing Dialogue in Fiction with Travis Mulhauser
This session will provide concrete strategies for sharpening your dialogue and strengthening its impact on your fiction. We will look at examples from masters like Elmore Leonard and Charles Portis, while also looking at writers who use dialogue more sparingly, but to equally profound effect. There are elements of good dialogue that cannot be taught—this session will deal with the parts that can be. This is recommended for writers who consider dialogue a particular strength, and writers who consider it a weakness. Good dialogue is about rhythm and word choice and knowing what needs to be said by your characters, but it is also about knowing what not to say. Writers will leave this class with a clearer sense of how they want to use dialogue in their fiction, and with the tools to apply it to their work.

Look Closer: Writing about Objects (all genres) with Julia Ridley Smith
Objects—whether everyday things, family heirlooms, or exquisite works of art—offer rich material for storytelling. The writer Italo Calvino put it this way: “The moment an object appears in a narrative, it is charged with a special force and becomes like the pole of a magnetic field, a knot in the network of invisible relationships. . . We might even say that in a narrative any object is always magic.”

In this multi-genre class, we’ll use familiar objects as a starting point for generating new writing. We’ll read and discuss literature that illuminates our material world, and we’ll consider the range of reactions, memories, stories, and cultural associations objects evoke for us. Creating vivid imagery often begins with paying close attention to what we see, so we'll practice looking together—examining a few specific objects and writing about them. Finally, you’ll have the opportunity to write about an object that’s personally significant to you.

Crafting Characters Round and Flat for the Screen with Mary M. Dalton
Context is everything. Sometimes characters need to change and grow, but other times characters serve a different purpose, such as pushing up against the arc of another character. Using Callie Khouri’s Oscar-winning and iconic screenplay Thelma & Louise as a case study, this class will examine character as a component of classical narrative structure and explore the limits of that paradigm. The session will include exercises for identifying the right type of character—round or flat—for your story and also provide tools for crafting that character. Reading the screenplay Thelma & Louise, which is widely available online, and seeing the movie in advance would be helpful but not necessary. Syd Field also has a useful analysis of the script in his book Four Screenplays: Studies in the American Screenplay.

12:00–1:00 pm Lunch
Under UNCG’s current COVID-19 guidelines, we will not be able to offer Lunch with an Author or any food or beverage at the on-site Spring Conference. If their guidelines change in time, we will give registrants an opportunity to order some sort of on-site lunch. Either way, we will provide all registrants with a list of quick and convenient lunch options within walking distance of the MHRA Building.

1:15–2:15 pm Faculty Readings 

2:30–4:00 pm Session II

Creative Nonfiction Master Class: Writing with Urgency with Belle Boggs**Closed**
Continued; see above for description.

Fiction Master Class with Derek Palacio **Closed**
Continued; see above for description.

Poetry Master Class: River of Time and Art with Laura Mullen **Closed**
Continued; see above for description.

Presenting Your Book with Charlie Lovett
Whether at a book festival, bookstore, school, or community event book readings are not what they used to be. The public wants more than just an author who stands and reads from their book. Best-selling novelist and playwright Charlie Lovett draws on his background in theatre to deliver what audiences want at author events—whether in person or virtual. In this class he will guide you through techniques you can use to up your game when discussing your work in public.

Talking the Talk (poetry) with Stuart Dischell
This class, open to poets at all levels of skill and experience, will focus on the use of dialogue as a strategic device in poetry.

Manifesting Thisness in Fiction with Caleb Johnson
The critic James Wood writes, “In life, as in literature, we navigate via the stars of detail.” Wood uses the term “thisness” to define any detail that centers our attention with its concretion. In this class we will use excerpts from Wood’s How Fiction Works and Brad Watson’s novel Miss Jane to examine why details matter in fiction. Using these examples as guides, we will mine our own memories to write a fictional scene that possesses thisness via details that are concrete, precise, and evocative.

The Group: How to Form Your Own Thriving Writing Workshop with Duncan Murrell
In a constantly fluctuating publishing economy, in which it sometimes appears that you have to pay to play, many writers are hiring editors to give them the kind of feedback that they might have gotten for free as a member of a writing workshop or writing group. But we all have stories of private writing workshops and groups that began with great intentions but then just kind of petered out—out of disorganization, or personal conflict, or missed deadlines, or just general boredom. In this panel we’ll talk about how to form a writing community and start a workshop that works and is useful: finding your people, developing a purpose for your group or workshop, creating a structure and a set of rules for accountability, talking about the work of others in ways that are both honest and helpful, growing a sense of community, and knowing when it’s time to take your work to the next level.

Is This Idea a Screenplay? with Joy Goodwin
In this workshop, we'll consider how to decide whether a particular story is a feature-length or series-length idea—or, perhaps, neither. Once that decision is made, what are the next steps in developing and realizing the idea?

4:30–5:30 pm Open Mic Readings I and II
Sign up at the conference registration table
Sign up at the conference registration table if you would like to share your work. Only twenty reading slots, of five minutes each, will be available, first-come, first-served.

5:30–6:30 pm Slush Pile Live!
Slush Pile Live! offers both poetry and prose in two rooms so that more attendees have a chance to receive feedback on their writing. Have you ever wondered what goes through an editor's mind as he or she reads through a stack of unsolicited submissions? Here's your chance to find out.

Beginning at 4:00 pm, attendees may drop off either 300 words of prose or one page of poetry in the room of their choice (location TBD). The author’s name should not appear on the manuscript, but the genre should.

Then, at 5:30 pm, a panel of editors will listen to the submissions being read out loud and raise their hand when they hear something that would make them stop reading if the piece were being submitted to their publication. The editors will discuss what they did and did not like about the sample, offering constructive feedback on the manuscript itself and the submission process. All anonymous—all live! (Authors can reveal themselves at the end, but only if they want to.)

Submissions should be double-spaced, 12-point, Times New Roman font. No names should appear on the submissions. 

 

Full Conference Schedule with Course Descriptions

ONLINE

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9:00 am–10:00 am Keynote Address by Carole Boston Weatherford (Livestreamed from UNCG )
Hailed by Huffington Post as a “master of picture book nonfiction,” Carole Boston Weatherford is a Newberry Honor author, New York Times bestseller, and two-time NAACP Image Award winner. Since her 1995 debut, she has published 50-plus books including these Caldecott Honor winners: Freedom in Congo Square, Voice of Freedom: Fannie Lou Hamer: Spirit of the Civil Rights Movement, and Moses: When Harriet Tubman Led Her People to Freedom. Six of her books have won Coretta Scott King Awards or Honors. A graduate of the Creative Writing MFA program at UNC Greensboro, Weatherford was inducted into the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame in 2020.

10:30 am – 12:00 pm Session I

In Flux(us) (all genres) with Steven SherrillOnline Only
“I’m fleshing out the idea. For now, my plan is to focus on process over product, and the inherent range of potential within almost every idea.”

Hitting a Home Run: Pitching to & Getting Published in Magazines with Rachel PriestOnline Only
So you’ve finally finished the story draft you’ve been working on for months. Or you recently met a person or have been to a place you think the world should know about and want to tell their story. You’ve found a few publications that you think would be a good fit for your work, but now you’re wondering what to do next.

If you’ve ever wanted to get your writing published in a magazine but didn’t know where to start or what to expect, this class is for you. This 90-minute session will focus on how and where to pitch your stories, what to expect if your story gets picked up, and what to do if your piece isn’t accepted.

12:00–1:15 pm

Online Picnic hosted by Michele T. BergerOnline Only

1:15–2:15 pm Faculty Readings (Livestreamed from UNCG )

2:30–4:00 pm Session II

The Sound of Prose with Maegan PolandOnline Only
In The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, Gertrude Stein writes about her dog and how “listening to the rhythm of his water drinking made her recognize the difference between sentences and paragraphs, that paragraphs are emotional and that sentences are not.” What might make a paragraph emotional? How do we find and enhance the energy of a sentence or a paragraph? How can syntax and sound intensify a description or an internal monologue? We will close-read passages from stylistically distinct authors and consider the elements and patterns that captivate us.

What Publishers Really Want from Authors: Building an Audience Before Your First Book Comes Out with Meg ReidOnline Only
You likely worked for years to write your book and get it accepted by a publisher. Now what? Most authors are more comfortable writing their book than marketing it. This class will focus on what publishers want to see authors do in the months before publication to help get the word out. Whether you’re an author with a traditional large publisher or smaller indie press or you’re self-publishing and responsible for all your own publicity, this workshop will tell you how to work in tandem with your publisher to support your book and lay the foundation for a successful book release.

4:30–5:30 pm Open Mic Readings I and IIOnline Only

5:30–6:30 pm Slush Pile Live! (Livestreamed from UNCG)
A panel of editors will listen to short submissions being read out loud and raise their hand when they hear something that would make them stop reading if the piece were being submitted to their publication. The editors will discuss what they did and did not like about the sample, offering constructive feedback on the manuscript itself and the submission process. All anonymous—all live!

 

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Faculty Biographies

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Spring Conference Faculty


Michele T. Berger is a professor, a writer, a creativity coach and a pug-lover. Her main love is writing speculative fiction, though she also is known to write poetry and creative nonfiction, too. Her fiction has appeared or is forthcoming in SLAY: Stories of the Vampire Noire, Concrete Dreams: Witches, Warriors and Wise Women, Afromyth: A Fantasy Collection Volume 2, Stories We Tell After Midnight #2, UnCommon Origins: A Collection of Gods, Monsters, Nature and Science, Flying South: A Literary Journal; 100 Word Story; Thing Magazine; Blood and Bourbon, FIYAH: Magazine of Black Speculative Fiction, and Midnight and Indigo. Her nonfiction writing and poetry have appeared in The Chapel Hill News, Glint Literary Journal, Oracle: Fine Arts Review, Trivia: Voices of Feminism, The Feminist Wire, Ms. Magazine, Carolina Woman Magazine, Western North Carolina Woman, A Letter to My Mom (Crown Press), Luminescent Threads: Connections to Octavia Butler (Twelfth Planet Press) and various zines. She is the 2019 winner of the Carl Brandon Kindred Award from the Carl Brandon Society for her story "Doll Seed" published in FIYAH: Magazine of Black Speculative Fiction. In 2020, her science fiction novella "Reenu-You," about a mysterious virus transmitted through a hair care product billed as a natural hair relaxer, was published by Falstaff Books. Much of her work explores psychological horror, especially through issues of race and gender. She is currently a trustee on board of the North Carolina Writers’ Network (NCWN) and President-Elect of the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association.


Belle Boggs is the author of The Gulf: A Novel; The Art of Waiting: On Fertility, Medicine, and Motherhood; and Mattaponi Queen: Stories. The Art of Waiting was a finalist for the PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay and was named a best book of the year by Kirkus, Publishers Weekly, the Globe and Mail, Buzzfeed, and O, the Oprah Magazine. Mattaponi Queen, a collection of linked stories set along Virginia’s Mattaponi River, won the Bakeless Prize and the Library of Virginia Literary Award and was a finalist for the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award. She has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the North Carolina Arts Council, and the Bread Loaf and Sewanee writers’ conferences. Her stories and essays have appeared in Orion, the Paris Review, Harper’s, Ecotone, the Atlantic, Newyorker.com, Ploughshares, and elsewhere. She is professor of English and director of the MFA program at NC State University.


Born in Toronto, Charmaine Cadeau now lives in Lewisville. She is an English professor at High Point University, where she teaches creative writing and literature, and serves as the advisor for Apogee Magazine. She has published two full-length collections of poetry, What You Used to Wear (Goose Lane Editions) and Placeholder (Brick Books), the most recent of which won the Brockman Campbell Book Award and the ReLit Award. Her newest book, Skytale, was handmade with the support of JackPine Press.


Jamie Chambliss is an agent with Folio Literary Management. Her clients include Lara Prescott, Lauren Hough, Tom Vitale, and Rachel Rodgers. Prior to joining Folio, she was with Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, working on both fiction and nonfiction and in editorial and marketing. She’s drawn to literary and book club fiction, and narrative nonfiction, especially dealing with food, pop culture, the quirks of human nature, the stories within the worlds of science and sports, and the forgotten corners of history. Prior to book publishing, she was a magazine journalist, covering, among other things, books, the arts, and sports narratives. She’s a graduate of Wake Forest University and has a master’s degree in journalism from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Mary M. Dalton is Professor of Communication at Wake Forest University where she teaches courses focusing on critical media studies and screenwriting. Her scholarly publications include articles, book chapters, and books, and her documentaries have been screened at various festivals, museums, and on public television. Over the years, she has taught screenwriting to a number of students who populate writers’ rooms on shows you may have seen and whose screenwriting credits appear on films viewed at the theater or streaming at home. She delights in their accomplishments.


Stuart Dischell
is the author of Good Hope Road (Viking), a National Poetry Series Selection, Evenings & Avenues (Penguin), Dig Safe (Penguin), Backwards Days (Penguin), Standing on Z (Unicorn), Children with Enemies (Chicago), and the forthcoming The Lookout Man (Chicago). A recipient of awards from the NEA, the North Carolina Arts Council, the Ledig-Rowohlt Foundation. and the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, he is the Class of 1952 Excellence Professor in the MFA Program in Creative Writing at the University of North Carolina Greensboro.


Joy Goodwin writes and produces independent films. Her credits include Black Nativity, May in the Summer, and the forthcoming Mabel (2022). She has been a fellow at Film Independent and The Writers Lab, and her screenplays have won awards at the Austin and Tribeca Film Festivals. She began her career in nonfiction television, winning an Emmy for documentary-writing. She is chair of the graduate screenwriting program at UNC School of the Arts.


Caleb Johnson is the author of the novel Treeborne, which received an honorable mention for the Southern Book Prize and was longlisted for the Crook's Corner Book Prize. His nonfiction, which has been cited in The Best American Essays, appears in Garden & Gun, Southern Living, The Wall Street Journal, and elsewhere. Caleb studied journalism at The University of Alabama and earned an MFA in creative writing from the University of Wyoming. His work has been supported by the Sewanee Writers' Conference and the Jentel Foundation. Currently, Caleb teaches writing at Appalachian State University and mentors students in Drexel University's low-residency MFA program.


Charlie Lovett  is The New York Times bestselling author of The Bookman's Tale, Escaping Dreamland, and other novels. He is the host of the podcast Inside the Writer's Studio and a playwright whose plays for children have been seen in over 5,000 productions worldwide. Charlie is the former president of Bookmarks and has had the chance there and at book festivals around the country, and in the UK, to see every kind of author presentation you can imagine. He brings his background in theatre to his own presentations, which he has given at bookstores, schools, and festivals for more than twenty-five years.

Travis Mulhauser was born and raised in Northern Michigan. His novel, Sweetgirl (Ecco/Harper Collins) was long-listed for The Center for Fiction’s First Novel Prize, was a Michigan Notable Book Award winner in 2017, an Indie Next Pick, and named one of Ploughshares Best Books of the New Year. Sweetgirl has also been published in France, Germany, Brazil, The Netherlands, and the UK. Travis is also the author of Greetings from Cutler County: A Novella and Stories, and received his MFA in Fiction from UNC-Greensboro. He is also a proud graduate of North Central Michigan College and Central Michigan University. He lives currently in Durham with his wife and two children.

Laura Mullen  is the author of eight books; recognitions for her poetry include a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship and a Rona Jaffe Award. Recent poems have appeared in Fence, Together in a Sudden Strangeness, and Bettering American Poetry. Her translation of Veronique Pittolo's Hero was published by Black Square Editions, and her translation of work by Stephanie Chaillou has just appeared in Interim. A collection of poems is forthcoming from Solid Objects Press in 2023. She teaches at Wake Forest University.

Duncan Murrell has been in publishing for more than twenty-five years in a variety of roles: book editor, writer, author, publisher, and teacher. He is the founder (with fellow Algonquin Books alum Chuck Adams) of CraftBook Editorial. During his career he’s edited New York Times bestsellers for Algonquin Books, Warner Books, Grand Central, and Thomas Nelson. He directed the writing program at Duke University’s Center for Documentary Studies, where he taught creative nonfiction and documentary writing courses, and he has also spent a semester as the visiting writer in UNC Wilmington’s Department of Creative Writing. He is a contributing editor at Harper’s Magazine and The Oxford American magazine, and has an MFA in fiction from Bennington College and a master’s in journalism from Northwestern University.


Derek Palacio received his MFA from the Ohio State University. He is the author of The Mortifications (2016), How to Shake the Other Man (2013), and "Sugarcane" (a short story which appeared in The O. Henry Prize Stories 2013). His work has appeared in the Kenyon Review, Witness, Story Quarterly, and elsewhere. He is a recipient of fellowships from the Black Mountain Institute, Ragdale, CubaOne, and the National Park Service. He teaches in the MFA program at UNC Greensboro.


Maegan Poland lives in Philadelphia, where she teaches creative writing and composition at Drexel University. Her debut short-story collection What Makes You Think You’re Awake? was selected by Carmen Maria Machado to win the Bakwin Award and was published in 2021 by Blair Press. Her fiction has been published in Mississippi Review, Pleiades, Beloit Fiction Journal, Juked, Notre Dame Review, and elsewhere. She has received a Special Mention in the Pushcart Prize anthology, a Tin House scholarship, and a grant from the Elizabeth George Foundation. You can find more information on her website at www.maeganpoland.com.


Rachel Priest is the assistant editor at The Bitter Southerner, an online and print publication focused on moving the South forward through great storytelling about the people, places, and movements in the region. She grew up in Minnesota but graduated from the University of Georgia with degrees in journalism and history. Prior to her work at The Bitter Southerner, she was a writer and editor at The Red & Black’s culture desk and wrote long-form features for Ampersand magazine. Her stories focusing on transracial adoption and the Asian American experience can be found at Rewire and The Bitter Southerner. She currently lives in Atlanta.

Meg Reid is a book designer and writer living in South Carolina. She is the Director of Hub City Press in Spartanburg, SC, where she finds and champions exciting new voices from the American South. An editor and book designer, her essays have appeared online in outlets like DIAGRAM, Oxford American, and The Rumpus. She holds an MFA in Nonfiction from UNC-Wilmington, where she served as Assistant Editor of the literary magazine, Ecotone, and worked for the literary imprint Lookout Books. She also writes about all areas of design.


Steven Sherrill has five novels in the world (The Minotaur Takes a Cigarette Break and Joy, PA, among them), a book of poems (Ersatz Anatomy), hours of sound that occasionally verges on musicality here and here, enough video madness to give you a lifetime of nightmares at https://vimeo.com/user15194112, a basement full of paintings and banjos and synthesizers and gongs, and a motorcycle in his garage. In September of 2021, he rode that motorcycle 2500 miles, 21 days, through the Blue Ridge Mountains, with a travel banjo, to play and sing at the graves of Old Time Banjo Gods. Before that, Steven Sherrill dropped out of high school, got himself a Welding Diploma at a community college, and eventually graduated from the Iowa Writers Workshop.


Julia Ridley Smith is the author of The Sum of Trifles (University of Georgia Press, 2021), a memoir in essays about cleaning out her parents' house. Her short stories and essays have appeared in Alaska Quarterly Review, Ecotone, Electric Literature, the New England Review, and The Southern Review, among other publications, and her nonfiction was recognized as notable in The Best American Essays 2019. She's been awarded scholarships, fellowships, and residencies by the Sewanee Writers’ Conference, the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, the Millay Colony, the Cuttyhunk Island Residency, and the Weymouth Center for the Arts and Humanities. After earning her MFA from Sarah Lawrence College, she worked for nearly twenty years as a freelance copyeditor of academic books. She's taught creative writing and literature at UNC Greensboro, as well as art-based writing workshops at the Weatherspoon Art Museum. Currently, she teaches fiction writing at UNC Chapel Hill, where she is the 2021-22 Kenan Visiting Writer. She lives in her hometown of Greensboro. You can find her at www.juliaridleysmith.com, and follow her on Twitter at @JuliaTrifles.


Carole Boston Weatherford, Baltimore-born and raised, composed her first poem in first grade and dictated the verse to her mother on the ride home from school. Her father, a high school printing teacher, printed some of her early poems on index cards Since her literary debut with Juneteenth Jamboree in 1995, Carole’s books have received three Caldecott Honors, two NAACP Image Awards, an SCBWI Golden Kite Award, a Coretta Scott King Author Honor and many other honors. For career achievements, Carole received the Ragan-Rubin Award from North Carolina English Teachers Association and the North Carolina Literature Award, among the state’s highest civilian honors. She holds an M.A. in publications design from University of Baltimore and an M.F.A. in creative writing from University of North Carolina, Greensboro. She is a Professor of English at Fayetteville State University in North Carolina.

 


 

The 2022 Spring Conference is made possible with support from The MFA in Creative Writing Department at UNC-Greensboro; Lynda Chambers; Regal House Publishing; Written Word Media; and the North Carolina Arts Council.


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