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Tag Archives: literary magazines

Last Issue of Glimmer Train Set for October

Glimmer Train will join Tin House magazine as the second major literary journal to close its doors in 2019. The last issue of the iconic rag, which has been published continuously for nearly thirty years, will be published in October. Founded by two sisters, Susan and Linda, in 1990, Glimmer Train established itself as a […]

Final Issue of Tin House Set for June

The literary world will lose one of its prized citizens in June when Tin House, one of America’s premier literary journals, stops the presses after two decades serving readers and writers. Editors Win McCormack and Rob Spillman sent an e-mail to subscribers in mid-December, announcing the decision. “Twenty years feels like the right time to […]

What Are Your Writerly Intentions for 2018?

With the holiday season behind us and a new year ahead, it’s a natural time to take stock of where we are on our writing journey and consider what we want to achieve this calendar year. Don’t consider them “resolutions.” Instead, let’s take positive steps toward our writing goals. Let’s think about where we want […]

Year in Review: Literary Magazines

This year on the White Cross School blog has been all about literary magazines. We’ve featured one each week, mostly from North Carolina, but a few from our friends in South Carolina as well. It’s the end of the year, and we “think” we made it through the ones we’re familiar with, anyway, although we’re […]

A Sense of Permanence and Place: Pisgah Review

Pisgah National Forest covers approximately 86,700 acres in Western North Carolina and was established as one of the first national forests in the United States. It was also the site of the country’s first forestry school. Very much rooted in its sense of history and place, Pisgah Review publishes two issues a year out of […]

Arts as Integral to our Everyday: Chautauqua

The Chautauqua Institution on the shores of Chautauqua Lake in southwestern New York state is a community that “celebrates, encourages, and studies the arts and treats them as integral to all of learning.” Every summer, this community that has has received awards and recognition for heritage, sustainability, and management of the local environment hosts opera, […]

The Sun: Independent, Reader-Supported

The Sun, produced in Chapel Hill, recently published its 500th issue (August, 2017). Inside, they devoted “more than half our pages” to excerpts from the archives—as much to offer up historical perspective on the current divisions in our country as to showcase its long tradition of excellence. The response was so overwhelmingly positive, this special […]

The Only Constant Is Change for Change Seven

When it comes to literary journals, North Carolina has an embarrassment of riches. Each publication offers a different point of view, a different aesthetic, and chases different aims, yet each and every one strives for, and largely maintains, widely recognized standards of excellence. Founded in 2015, Change Seven is a recent addition to the literary […]

Legit Southerners Only: The Mule

“No good Southern fiction is complete without a dead mule,” says Val MacEwan, editor and publisher of The Dead Mule School of Southern Literature. The distinctive name of this online literary magazine, founded in 1996, orginiated in a paper about “Equine Signifiers in Southern Literature” by Dr. Jerry Leath Mills, and it’s a fitting moniker […]

Where the A-List Literary Celebrities Mingle

For more than a quarter century, the North Carolina Literary Review (NCLR) has published most of the great writers from North Carolina as well as high-quality writing about the Tar Heel State. Part scholarly journal, part literary rag, NCLR offers—as one early reviewer put it— “everything you ever wanted out of a literary publication but […]